Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 610618 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #730 on: November 17, 2013, 11:56:31 am »
That's actually something I started wondering about in the 90ies, watching the TV show Roseanne. They always took those huge plastic containers out of the fridge. Who can even empty such a big container before the contents get spoiled?

I'll tell you who -- my two sons. Together, they are capable of going through nearly a gallon a day. That's without me drinking any.

One reason I had to go to the grocery store so often when they were both home is because my fridge and car and grocery cart can only hold so many gallons of milk. (My fridge is the smallest I could find and it's still pretty big, but most current American fridges would not fit under the cabinets in my 1948 kitchen.)

Now with just one son here we go through maybe a gallon and a half of milk a week, plus a gallon jug of apple cider and other juices in smaller containers.



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #731 on: November 17, 2013, 03:56:05 pm »
Had to have a non-leather baseball glove.

I didn't even know there was such a thing.  :-\
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #732 on: November 18, 2013, 02:05:37 am »
I'll tell you who -- my two sons. Together, they are capable of going through nearly a gallon a day. That's without me drinking any.


 :laugh:
Okay, I take my question back. ;D
We need roughly one liter a day. But I'm restricting milk (rather cocoa) for my kids first because I think it's food, not a beverage for quenching your thirst. And second they don't drink pure milk anyway, only sweet cocoa. I think one or two cups a day is enough of the sweetness.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #733 on: November 18, 2013, 10:03:33 am »
:laugh:
Okay, I take my question back. ;D
We need roughly one liter a day. But I'm restricting milk (rather cocoa) for my kids first because I think it's food, not a beverage for quenching your thirst. And second they don't drink pure milk anyway, only sweet cocoa. I think one or two cups a day is enough of the sweetness.

I can understand that. For myself I can't imagine drinking milk as a thirst quencher.  :P  The only way I can stand to drink it is with chocolate in it  ;D  or along with eating something, preferably something sweet. Otherwise I can't stand the taste of the stuff, especially if it isn't whole milk.

Incidentally, I seem to recall reading somewhere that there is a school of thought that a fluid intended to nurture baby bovines is not something humans should be consuming.  8)
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline brian

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #734 on: November 18, 2013, 01:39:52 pm »
Milk is my favourite thirst quencher. However I buy lite milk and about 1 litre per week. I often put strawberry flavouring in it or make hot chocolate in winter. I love milk shakes and it is one thing I find hard to buy when travelling in Europe. I now use SoGood (soy milk) on my cereal for breakfast. I always have a cappuchino when out (probably about 4 times per week Dunedin is famous for its coffee culture) but only drink black coffee at home. I cannot start my day without a black coffee.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #735 on: November 18, 2013, 02:30:40 pm »
I just finished Adam Gopnik's Nov. 4 article about baking bread with his mother. Almost makes me want to go out and do it.

Although his mother's habit of referring to yeast as "little bugs" might tend to curb one's appetite a bit.  :-\
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #736 on: November 18, 2013, 06:49:57 pm »
Although his mother's habit of referring to yeast as "little bugs" might tend to curb one's appetite a bit.  :-\

Yay think?  :laugh:

Now, whenever I hear 'yeast' I think of Glee.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #737 on: November 18, 2013, 11:30:54 pm »
Now, whenever I hear 'yeast' I think of Glee.

Hunh?  ???
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #738 on: November 19, 2013, 09:17:20 am »
Hunh?  ???

:laugh:

Three of the 'students' on Glee have graduated (Kurt, Santana, & Rachel) and the show divides its time between the students still in school, and these three.   Well, the three of them made a friendly bet to see who would be the first to book acting/singing jobs.

Santana won the bet, explaining she had been picked to do a commercial for a product called "Yeast-I-Stat".

She then played the commercial for them, and it's a take-off on all those bad feminine hygene commercials, she's running through fields of grass, swinging on a swing,......I thought it was hysterical.

The best line in her commercial comes close to the end, when she's hosting a breakfast gathering, and holding a tray of bagels.



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d67hYDaWcwc[/youtube]


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #739 on: November 19, 2013, 10:46:15 am »
I'm restricting milk (rather cocoa) for my kids first because I think it's food,

 :laugh:  That's exactly why I let my kids drink it in unlimited quantities. Well, to be honest I let them drink just about anything (nonalcoholic) in unlimited quantities. But milk is so much more nutritious and less sugary (they drink it plain) than beverages they might choose instead.

While we're on the topic, or rather so far off topic I can't even see the tracks from here, can I ask you one more quick non-New Yorker question? How do you introduce your kids to alcohol over there? Do you wait until they're 18 and then they just drink as older people do? Or do they drink at home at younger ages? I'm interested in your family, but also your culture in general.

The drinking age here is 21. But when we were in Europe last summer, my then 18-year-old was old enough to drink. And my 17-year-old, while not yet strictly legal, had absolutely no problem obtaining a mojito when the two went to the beach together in Barcelona, or buying a beer when he stopped into the corner bodega in France. I decided to play it when-in-Rome, loosening the rules for my younger son also, and let them drink a little bit, which they never do at home. They were very moderate: a mojito on the beach, a beer or vodka-orange juice late at night. My confidence in their alcohol use was actually increased over what it would be if I had banned it entirely and then had no idea whether, given half a chance, they might drink until they were blotto.

The other night my son and I went to my stepmother's for dinner. She, after asking my permission, poured him a third of a glass or so of wine. She's American but very Europhillic, and her husband is Hungarian. I had no problem with it. It seems a much better approach than the standard American approach to alcohol, to absolutely prohibit it until the magic age is reached, and then ... time to binge like crazy!!

In Wisconsin, about an hour's drive from here, the culture is somewhat different. The state was settled mainly by Germans, and there's a very bar-friendly, beer-friendly culture there. Kids accompanied by their parents can drink in bars in unlimited quantities -- until they're 18. Then they can't drink publicly under any circumstances until they're 21. Sound bizarre? It's because at 18 they're adults, as everyone in the country is, so their parents aren't in charge of them, but Wisconsin's drinking age is 21, as it is everywhere in the country, so they can't legally drink.

When I was a teenager, both the age of adulthood and the drinking age were 18 (i.e., like almost everywhere else in the developed world), but a few years later they raised the drinking age. The federal government did not force states to raise their drinking ages, but would not give federal highway funding to any state below 21. Thus, all states are now 21.