Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 650891 times)

Offline Jeff Wrangler

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 27,427
  • "He somebody you cowboy'd with?"
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2250 on: November 17, 2019, 08:05:47 pm »
Once again I'm way behind in my reading. I visited my dad this weekend, and I had the Nov. 11 issue with me. This should have been the perfect time to catch up, but the trouble was, I just didn't feel like reading TNY. I was more interested in re-reading a book I'd first read many years ago, so that's what I did.

The Nov. 18 issue was waiting for me when I returned home late this afternoon.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 18,772
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2251 on: November 17, 2019, 08:43:05 pm »
Careful ... an issue here, an issue there, and next thing you know you’ve got a pile dating back to the previous presidential administration.

:laugh:

Offline Front-Ranger

  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 25,778
  • Brokeback got us good.
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2252 on: November 30, 2019, 01:02:23 pm »
Last night at only 6 pm I retired to my fireplace setting and read three (3!) articles from the latest issue. "The Defector" is another in the almost-weekly series of articles about how the Internet is taking away our privacy and humanity. "Ecstacsy and Ruin" is about Beck, where Los Angeles attempts, and nearly succeeds in stealing the spotlight. "Can You Forgive Her?" draws subtle parallels between Thatcher-era Britain and what we are going through in the U.S. now. I also read parts of "The Interview" about volunteers who try to get parole for people imprisoned for serious crimes. It seems like an exercise in futility. Even the criminals themselves don't understand why the volunteers are doing it.

Even though some of these topics are heavy, I find reading The New Yorker a good stress reliever. People tell me to watch shows like "The Sopranos", etc. but I find them very depressing and it often takes me several days to get over a watching session.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Front-Ranger

  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 25,778
  • Brokeback got us good.
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2253 on: November 30, 2019, 01:05:02 pm »
During Thanksgiving I listened to NPR's "On Giving" show and delighted to hear Adam Gopnik talk on several subjects. Apparently he has a new book out called The Table Comes First, which I'd like to give my son for Christmas.
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline serious crayons

  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 18,772
Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2254 on: November 30, 2019, 05:39:23 pm »
Last night at only 6 pm I retired to my fireplace setting and read three (3!) articles from the latest issue. "The Defector" is another in the almost-weekly series of articles about how the Internet is taking away our privacy and humanity. "Ecstacsy and Ruin" is about Beck, where Los Angeles attempts, and nearly succeeds in stealing the spotlight. "Can You Forgive Her?" draws subtle parallels between Thatcher-era Britain and what we are going through in the U.S. now. I also read parts of "The Interview" about volunteers who try to get parole for people imprisoned for serious crimes. It seems like an exercise in futility. Even the criminals themselves don't understand why the volunteers are doing it.

Those sound interesting. I don't think I would have read the Beck story without your endorsement. I'll try it.

It happened again this week. I was looking forward to reading the New Yorker, which contained a piece by David Sedaris. I usually turn immediately to anything he writes. But when I got the mail that evening I found another, newer New Yorker.


Quote
Even though some of these topics are heavy, I find reading The New Yorker a good stress reliever. People tell me to watch shows like "The Sopranos", etc. but I find them very depressing and it often takes me several days to get over a watching session.

I put off watching The Sopranos until a few years ago, then I watched all six seasons -- an episode a night. Mostly I enjoyed them but I'll admit there were a few in there that were hard to take.

And I know what you mean. I'm in a TV rut right now and I should either finish the season of Orange is the New Black, or watch the new season of The Handmaid's Tale, but both sound like such downers I'm never in the mood to turn them on. (OITNB is occasionally light, but also often depressing. THT is never light.)