Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 883800 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2380 on: April 19, 2020, 05:17:36 pm »
A couple of days ago I watched the recent movie The Lighthouse which was favorably reviewed in TNY. It was so creepy it gave me nightmares.

Two guys in a Godforesaken lonely place out in the middle of nowhere. Yes, there was attraction, but not in the Brokeback way. Ends badly, but not in the Brokeback way.

I honestly can't recommend it. If you like psychological thrillers, then maybe. It could also be termed a horror movie, in the sense that you are horrified that it was made into a movie.

And yes, wonderful Robert Pattinson is one of the two guys. But still...

Yeah, I've heard that higly praised, but have been reluctant to watch it myself. If it's something that's going to make me feel bleak afterward, I'll skip it. I can handle sad, a la Brokeback, but not bleak, a la Requiem for a Dream, Platoon, Leaving Las Vegas, Manchester by the Sea ...

Have you seen Nice Guys, in which Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling play kind of bumbling cops? That one was light and fun. I have been thinking of watching it again.




Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2381 on: April 28, 2020, 10:58:55 am »
Yeah, I've heard that higly praised, but have been reluctant to watch it myself. If it's something that's going to make me feel bleak afterward, I'll skip it. I can handle sad, a la Brokeback, but not bleak, a la Requiem for a Dream, Platoon, Leaving Las Vegas, Manchester by the Sea ...

Have you seen Nice Guys, in which Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling play kind of bumbling cops? That one was light and fun. I have been thinking of watching it again.

Yes, it was so bleak that it felt right that it was in black and white. I found out later that it was based on a story of 2 lighthouse keepers, one of which died by accident and the other one kept the body around to prove that he hadn't murdered him. But then he went crazy.

I need some more good, uplifting movie suggestions! I watched An Education again. I had forgotten that it is not uplifting or hopeful. Manchester by the Sea was one that scarred me for life. I could not understand what all the hoopla was about it.
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2382 on: April 28, 2020, 01:22:41 pm »
I need some more good, uplifting movie suggestions!

Do you mean morally or spiritually, or just cheerful?
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2383 on: April 28, 2020, 03:45:38 pm »
Manchester by the Sea was one that scarred me for life. I could not understand what all the hoopla was about it.

Manchester by the Sea and other bleak movies don't usually scar me for life, but they do scar me for a few days.

In some cases, I can understand the hoopla even if I wished I hadn't seen the movie. Leaving Las Vegas, for example, is very well made. So is Requiem for a Dream. But after I saw them, I wished I hadn't. Still, some people -- including my son -- don't mind bleakness in movies at all.

About 20 years ago (after seeing Affliction with Nick Nolte), I realized I just don't want to see bleak movies, however well regarded. Occasionally I'm not sufficiently forewarned, but generally I try to keep an eye out for them and stay away. Most recently, The Joker. Some directors I know to avoid, such as Lars von Trier.

Speaking of bleakness and, ostensibly, the New Yorker, Atul Gawande's piece a couple of issues ago about deaths of despair is, in a way, well timed. I'm sure it was written before the pandemic hit this country, but I'm sure the pandemic will cause deaths of despair to skyrocket. There's a story in the paper today about a doctor who, with no history of mental illness, killed herself after working in ERs in NYC.

For a safe light but critically acclaimed viewing, you can't go too wrong with Wes Anderson.




Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2384 on: April 28, 2020, 06:03:50 pm »
There's a story in the paper today about a doctor who, with no history of mental illness, killed herself after working in ERs in NYC.

That made TV news, too. So sad.  :(
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Online southendmd

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2385 on: April 28, 2020, 06:41:40 pm »
That made TV news, too. So sad.  :(

And she was 39 years old.  Very sad indeed. 

This came up during a zoom call with my colleagues.  We psychiatric folk are trying to support our fellow medical workers, because the trauma has been extreme.  We sometimes have several deaths a day and it takes a toll on people.  We lost our first hospital employee and that hit hard.

We have social workers embedded in the ICU teams.  No one is taking any time off, because we're still in a surge.  I'm working directly with positive patients and it's exhausting at times.  And I have to support my staff as well who are on the front lines.  I fear this thing will be with us in some shape or form for quite a while.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2386 on: April 28, 2020, 07:36:52 pm »
We have social workers embedded in the ICU teams.  No one is taking any time off, because we're still in a surge.  I'm working directly with positive patients and it's exhausting at times.  And I have to support my staff as well who are on the front lines.  I fear this thing will be with us in some shape or form for quite a while.

I fear you're right, and it sounds like your job is tough these days.  :-\

My job is actually easier than usual, so I can't complain. I did take a bit of a risk covering the anti-shutdown protest on Saturday, working around idiots who -- maskless, non-distancing -- are by definition dangerous to be near. But I did my best to keep a distance.

"I'm not sick! I have no symptoms! Why should I stay home?" one guy said.

I talked to a couple carrying a sign that blamed not just the governor but also Bill Gates. Since then, I've gathered that Bill Gates is being blamed for something or other. In this case, they couple said Bill Gates is "practicing population control" by supporting vaccinations, which they insist are killing children. Because of course vaccinations are far more deadly than the diseases they're designed to prevent.  ::)





Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2387 on: April 28, 2020, 09:37:37 pm »
And she was 39 years old.  Very sad indeed. 

This came up during a zoom call with my colleagues.  We psychiatric folk are trying to support our fellow medical workers, because the trauma has been extreme.  We sometimes have several deaths a day and it takes a toll on people.  We lost our first hospital employee and that hit hard.

We have social workers embedded in the ICU teams.  No one is taking any time off, because we're still in a surge.  I'm working directly with positive patients and it's exhausting at times.  And I have to support my staff as well who are on the front lines.  I fear this thing will be with us in some shape or form for quite a while.

Hang in there, bud.  :-*  And take care of yourself.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Online southendmd

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2388 on: April 28, 2020, 10:36:27 pm »
Hang in there, bud.  :-*  And take care of yourself.

Thanks, friend.  :-*

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #2389 on: May 02, 2020, 11:47:38 am »
I echo that. And I wonder how these health professionals are holding up and getting fed, since you probably don't have time to cook, but deserve to have the best of sustenance.
When you see the smiley face in the sky, the pandemic will be over!