Author Topic: The "ABCs of BBM": Round 965! (Rules in first post)  (Read 2819833 times)

Online southendmd

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Round 959!
« Reply #22800 on: June 18, 2013, 02:52:15 pm »
Round 959!

The Gay Pride Round!

Please play an unplayed word, plus either:

"gay", "pride", "proud" or "queer"


Offline memento

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"A" is attitudes
« Reply #22801 on: June 24, 2013, 12:44:11 pm »
An excerpt from a Planet Jackson Hole interview with Annie Proulx:

PJH:  I think it's clear to anyone who reads "Brokeback Mountain" that above all it's a wrenching, starcrossed love story. It is about two cowboys, but it seems inaccurate to call it gay literature. How do you feel about the film being assailed as gay agitprop emerging from liberal Hollywood? Did you ever intend for the story to be controversial?

AP: Excuse me, but it is NOT a story about "two cowboys." It is a story about two inarticulate, confused Wyoming ranch kids in 1963 who have left home and who find themselves in a personal sexual situation they did not expect, understand, nor can manage. The only work they find is herding sheep for a summer -- some cowboys! Yet both are beguiled by the cowboy myth, as are most people who live in the state, and Ennis tries to be one but never gets beyond ranch-hand work; Jack settles on rodeo as an expression of the Western ideal. It more or less works for him until he becomes a tractor salesman. Their relationship endures for 20 years, never resolved, never faced up to, always haunted by fear and confusion. How different readers take the story is a reflection of their own personal values, attitudes, hang-ups. It is my feeling that a story is not finished until it is read, and that the reader finishes it through his or her life experience, prejudices, world view and thoughts. Far from being "liberal," Hollywood was afraid of the script as were many actors and agents. Of course, I knew the story would be seen as controversial. I doubted it would even be published and was pleased when The New Yorker very quickly accepted it. In the years since the story was published in 1997, I have received many letters from gay and straight men, not a few Wyoming-born. Some said, "You told my story," some said, "That is why I left Wyoming," and a number, from fathers, said, "Now I understand the hell my son went through." I still get these heartbreaking letters.

=aside= Paul
Nice theme.


Online southendmd

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"B" is bitches
« Reply #22802 on: June 25, 2013, 12:08:38 pm »
In this passage from the story, Jack bitches about being gay:

"Shit. I been lookin at people on the street. This happen a other people? What the hell do they do?"

"It don't happen in Wyomin' and if it does I don't know what they do, maybe go to Denver," said Jack, sitting up, turning away from him, "and I don't give a flyin' fuck. Son of a bitch, Ennis, take a couple days off. Right now. Get us out a here. Throw your stuff in the back a my truck and let's get up in the mountains. Couple a days. Call Alma up and tell her you're goin. Come on, Ennis, you just shot my airplane out a the sky -- give me somethin' a go on. This ain't no little thing that's happenin' here."

Offline Sason

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"C" is controversial
« Reply #22803 on: June 25, 2013, 01:05:17 pm »
An excerpt from a Planet Jackson Hole interview with Annie Proulx:

PJH:  I think it's clear to anyone who reads "Brokeback Mountain" that above all it's a wrenching, starcrossed love story. It is about two cowboys, but it seems inaccurate to call it gay literature. How do you feel about the film being assailed as gay agitprop emerging from liberal Hollywood? Did you ever intend for the story to be controversial?

AP: Excuse me, but it is NOT a story about "two cowboys." It is a story about two inarticulate, confused Wyoming ranch kids in 1963 who have left home and who find themselves in a personal sexual situation they did not expect, understand, nor can manage. The only work they find is herding sheep for a summer -- some cowboys! Yet both are beguiled by the cowboy myth, as are most people who live in the state, and Ennis tries to be one but never gets beyond ranch-hand work; Jack settles on rodeo as an expression of the Western ideal. It more or less works for him until he becomes a tractor salesman. Their relationship endures for 20 years, never resolved, never faced up to, always haunted by fear and confusion. How different readers take the story is a reflection of their own personal values, attitudes, hang-ups. It is my feeling that a story is not finished until it is read, and that the reader finishes it through his or her life experience, prejudices, world view and thoughts. Far from being "liberal," Hollywood was afraid of the script as were many actors and agents. Of course, I knew the story would be seen as controversial. I doubted it would even be published and was pleased when The New Yorker very quickly accepted it. In the years since the story was published in 1997, I have received many letters from gay and straight men, not a few Wyoming-born. Some said, "You told my story," some said, "That is why I left Wyoming," and a number, from fathers, said, "Now I understand the hell my son went through." I still get these heartbreaking letters.

=aside= Sandy
Thank you!  :)



Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline Fran

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"D" is detractors
« Reply #22804 on: June 25, 2013, 09:08:19 pm »
When asked who the biggest supporters and detractors were in his playing a gay cowboy, Heath Ledger replied:

"No one was trying to detract me from it. Everyone was very supportive of it. I hate to call it 'daring' or 'brave.' Firemen are daring and brave. I'm acting. I didn't get hurt and I'm not mentally wounded from this experience."

Heath Ledger interview

Offline memento

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"E" is excruciating
« Reply #22805 on: June 29, 2013, 11:46:03 am »
With Brokeback Mountain, director Ang Lee faced a daunting challenge: cinematically portraying homosexuality as romantic and erotic in an era where homophobia still intensely rages (those who object to this perception are living in denial). That he succeeds—resoundingly, at that— is a testament to his filmmaking prowess: Brokeback Mountain is a beautiful love story, and one of 2005’s best movies.

Unfortunately for Ennis and Jack, the 1960’s wasn’t a kind time for gay people, and the Midwest wasn’t a kind place. Rather than embrace their passion, they’re forced to hide it. After their freewheeling summer, both return to their homes: Jack to Texas, Ennis to Wyoming. Ennis marries his high school sweetheart Alma (Michelle Williams), and has two daughters. Jack continues to flop off bulls at the rodeo, and weds Lureen Newsome (Anne Hathaway), the vivacious, work-obsessed daughter of a filthy-rich farm-machinery tycoon.

Four years pass, and neither man has been able to shake the magic of their summer on Brokeback. Ennis finds himself struggling to show his wife the appreciation she deserves but the resonances are ambiguous: one particularly wonderful scene involves Ennis flipping his wife around to penetrate her from behind, obviously wishing that she was Jack. As it’s filmed from a very similar angle to the first homosexual sequence on Brokeback, it has an eerie sense of unfulfilling deja vu that rings a strong emotional chord. Even more excruciating is Ennis’ relationship with his daughters. His marriage is destined to fail (and it does), but his children are forever…and they love him to death...




Offline Sason

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"F" is fermented
« Reply #22806 on: June 29, 2013, 04:39:15 pm »
At their four year reunion, Ennis introduded Jack to Alma and, with visible pride, his two little daughters - while their passion fermented between them.

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Online southendmd

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"G" is gay-related
« Reply #22807 on: June 29, 2013, 04:49:43 pm »
Brokeback Mountain is one of the most successful gay-related films of all time.

Offline Meryl

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"H" is harlots
« Reply #22808 on: July 03, 2013, 03:08:13 pm »
Ennis refused to think of himself as queer but had no qualms about asking Jack to confess to visiting male harlots in Mexico.
Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Sason

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"I" is infuriate
« Reply #22809 on: July 06, 2013, 06:07:29 pm »
Any suggestion - like Alma did at the Thanksgiving dinner - that Ennis was gay, would infuriate him to the degree of storming out the house and trying to beat up some truck driver.

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