Author Topic: John Carter (of Mars) - March 9 2012 - (with Canadian Taylor Kitsch on Barsoom!)  (Read 12122 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Rf55GTEZ_E&feature[/youtube]



.



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and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Dell, 1940









Taylor Kitsch


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline delalluvia

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Offline Meryl

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Whoa!  :P

I've wondered about this character of Edgar Rice Burroughs' and looked him up on Wikipedia.  Next year will be the 100th anniversary of John Carter's first appearance in "A Princess of Mars."

Carter stands 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) and has close-cropped black hair and steel-grey eyes. Burroughs portrays him as an immortal being. In the opening pages of A Princess of Mars, the author reveals to the reader that Carter can remember no childhood, having always been a man of about thirty years old. Many generations of families referred to him as "Uncle Jack," but he always lived to see all the members of the families grow old and die, while he remained young.

His character and courtesy exemplify the ideals of the antebellum South. A Virginian, he served as a captain in the American Civil War on the side of the Confederacy. He strikes it rich by finding gold in Arizona after the end of hostilities. While hiding from Apaches in a cave, he appears to die, and leaving his inanimate body behind is mysteriously transported by a form of astral projection to the planet Mars, where he finds himself re-embodied in a form identical to his earthly one. Accustomed to the greater gravity of Earth, he is much stronger than the natives of Mars.


I'm hoping this film turns out to be good!  8)
Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/05/movies/john-carter-based-on-princess-of-mars.html


John Carter  (2012)

Lynn Collins, left, and Taylor Kitsch in "John Carter," in which a soldier frees himself from creatures
on another planet and finds a red-tinted princess needing a prince charming.
 





Quaint Martian Odyssey
With Multiplex Stopover

By CHARLES McGRATH
Published: March 4, 2012



Edgar Rice Burroughs's sci-fi series has captivated readers for a century.



Edgar Rice Burroughs, more well-known for "Tarzan of the Apes," did away with all logic in
creating his sci-fi series.



“John Carter,” Disney’s $250 million, 3-D sci-fi epic, which opens on Friday, is based on a novel, Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “Princess of Mars,” that is 100 years old and was already a little dated when it came out. Burroughs, better known for his Tarzan  saga, published it in monthly installments in the All-Story Magazine  starting in February 1912. It was the first thing he ever wrote, after a lifetime of failing at just about everything else, and he was clearly learning on the job.

The book is filled with inconsistencies and plot threads that are never followed up. And as science fiction goes, “Princess of Mars” is not very scientific. Ostensibly it is a first-person narrative by one John Carter, a Civil War veteran who unaccountably wakes up naked on Mars, where he falls in love with a red-tinted princess named Dejah Thoris.

It’s typical of Burroughs that there is no attempt to imagine a rocket ship or a time machine, as in Jules Verne, say, or H. G. Wells. Space travel is just something that happens, and if the prose weren’t so methodical and matter of fact — and if Burroughs weren’t so meticulous in explaining how he came by Carter’s “manuscript” — we might think he had dreamed it all.

The Library of America plans to reissue “Princess of Mars” in April with an introduction by Junot Diaz, an unusual elevation for a book that began as a pulp serial and whose appeal remains a kind of cheerful boys’ adventure romanticism. Seldom, if ever, out of print, “Princess” has enjoyed a remarkable shelf life not so much in libraries or classrooms as in the cluttered, dreamy, overheated minds of teenage boys and certain grown-ups. Out of nostalgia or affection they have preserved that part of their mental storeroom from housecleaning and have not only made early editions of the John Carter books into expensive collector’s items, but have also extended the character into fan fiction online.

Andrew Stanton, the director of “John Carter,” said recently that he discovered the book in 1976, when he was 11, via the Marvel  comics version, and though he wasn’t much of a reader then, he quickly graduated to Burroughs in book form. “All through my 20s and 30s,” he said, “long before I ever thought I’d become a professional storyteller, I couldn’t get that stuff out of my head.”

The charm of the book, and the 10 novels that followed, is not its futurism. Mars, or Barsoom, as it’s called by the inhabitants, seems stuck in a 19th century of its own. There are airships, but they are very sketchily described and are apparently made in part of wood. There is mention of rifles with a range of hundreds of miles, but most of the fighting is done with swords. What really interests Burroughs is not the physical properties of Barsoom but the strange taxonomy of its mostly primitive inhabitants, which he lovingly describes, especially the Tharks, a race of giant green-skinned, four-armed nomads with tusks that “curve upward to sharp points which end about where the eyes of earthly human beings are located” and whose whiteness “is not that of ivory, but of the snowiest and most gleaming of china.”

There are also thoats, hairless beasts of burden equipped as well with extra limbs, four on each side; calots, enormous, toadlike watchdogs; fearsome white apes; creepy plant men with mouths in their hands; and two warring city states, Helium and Zadonga, inhabited by red-complexioned humanoids. Dejah Thoris is one of these, except for her ruddiness a more or less standard-issue heroine in need of saving.

In the ’70s Ballantine reinvigorated the Barsoom franchise by publishing the books in new editions with covers by the fantasy artist Frank Frazetta, who didn’t actually bother to read the series and imagined a hunky, Conan-like John Carter and very sexy Dejah, clad in just a few diaphanous scraps. (Neither the Frazetta paintings nor the books offer any clues about her reproductive system: though womanly in every respect that meets the eye, Dejah eventually bears Carter a son, Cathoris, who like a Thark, is hatched from an egg after incubating for several years.) These editions were what caught the eye of the novelist Michael Chabon, who wrote the screenplay along with Mr. Stanton and Mark Andrews.

“I was 11 or 12,” Mr. Chabon recalled recently, “and I thought: ‘What are these? This is something I ought to know about.’ It was a magical moment in my childhood.”

Egg hatching aside, “Princess of Mars” is not a very sexy book. As in the Tarzan novels what interests Burroughs is not so much romance as what it means to be human — or more precisely, to be manly. Much is made of the Tharks’ primitive sense of humor, which finds amusement in the suffering of others, and in their cruelty to animals. The reason, the novel suggests, is that they are socialists, who raise their children communally and have no concept of parental love.

Carter, on the other hand, is a courtly Southern gentleman, who remarks of himself: “I was always kind and humane in my dealings with the lower orders. I could take a human life, if necessary, with far less compunction than that of a poor, unreasoning, irresponsible brute.”

The Barsoom novels are a little like the Oz  novels of Burroughs’s friend and eventual California neighbor L. Frank Baum, whose estate, Ozcot, was not far from Burroughs’s Tarzana. Both are partly reflections of how the authors saw the United States at the time. But even more, they’re escapes from it, written by relatively late bloomers who found in writing a fulfillment that had earlier been denied them. Burroughs was 35 and a struggling salesman of pencil sharpeners when he began “Princess of Mars.” He was an avid reader of the pulps himself and decided, he said later, that “I could write stories just as rotten.”

The novel is escape literature in every sense. Its animating feature is a yearning to be somewhere else — anywhere, just as long as it’s not the pencil sharpener factory — and the book’s impassioned feeling of otherness (right down to those weird names) is what has made it so transporting for generations of readers and both tempting and daunting to filmmakers, who have struggled since the ’30s to come up with a version that will play to both young viewers and adults, newcomers and members of the cult.

Mr. Stanton was the lead writer for the “Toy Story” trilogy and the writer and director of “Finding Nemo” and “Wall-E.” “John Carter” is his first movie to employ live actors. (Carter is Taylor Kitsch, from “Friday Night Lights.”) In the course of making the film, he said, he kept coming across people with deep and long-standing connections to the material. One of the costume designers, for example, recalled that her father used to drive around with a Utah license plate that said JEDDAK. “Jeddak,” as any close reader of Burroughs can tell you, is Barsoomese for lord or chieftain.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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John Carter
Exclusive Ten Minute Scene

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4HaE5Zs8dAY[/youtube]
Uploaded by DisneyMovieTrailers on Mar 3, 2012





"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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John Carter
[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeEMbPhgy64[/youtube]
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[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XavXWxqZvLY&feature=relmfu[/youtube]
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"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Dell, 1940
Those eyes remind me of the Evil Queen in Disney's Snow White.

Actually, the whole face does.  :-\
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline southendmd

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Those eyes remind me of the Evil Queen in Disney's Snow White.

Actually, the whole face does.  :-\


They certainly use the same makeup artist. 

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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They certainly use the same makeup artist.  



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-b82JY6qmQ[/youtube]
Sorry, Youtube INSISTS you watch this HERE:
&feature
Alvy Singer (Woody Allen) with
Dejah Thoris on Barsoom?

 ;D ;D ;D

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Woah. I forgot  how
Eee-vil the Evil Queen
was!!
[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkaOpI1S4Tk[/youtube]



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/john-carter-film-review-297041





John Carter
Film Review

Director Andrew Stanton's Disney extravaganza
is a rather charming pastiche, if perhaps not one
with sufficient excitement and razzle-dazzle to justify
the reported $250 million production budget.


by Todd McCarthy
2:45 AM PST 3/6/2012





Opens
Friday, March 9 (Disney)

Director
Andrew Stanton

Cast
Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins, Samantha Morton, Willem Dafoe, Thomas Haden Church, Mark Strong, Ciaran Hinds, Dominic West, James Purefoy, Bryan Cranston, Polly Walker, Daryl Sabara





Given that it's based on a pioneering work of science fiction, there can be little surprise that John Carter  feels like a hodgepodge of any number of familiar elements, some of which were no doubt borrowed by others from Edgar Rice Burroughs and brought full circle here. This Disney extravaganza is a rather charming pastiche, if perhaps not one with sufficient excitement and razzle-dazzle to justify the reported $250 million production budget. Neither classic nor fiasco, the film will likely delight sci-fi geeks most of all, but there's enough here for general Disney audiences as well to generate solid box office worldwide.

If Avatar  had never existed, it's possible that John Carter  would have seemed like more of a genre breakthrough, given the premise of a distant planet penetrated by an Earthling who begins an interplanetary romance and is ultimately accepted into the alien culture (Mars here even has a huge arboreal structure at the heart of things). But echoes resonate from many other sources as well: What came first, the Jedi of Star Wars  or the Jeddak leaders here? Was Taylor Kitsch's buff loincloth look inspired by how good Charlton Heston looked similarly attired in Planet of the Apes ? Doesn't John Carter 's background consist of one part Outlaw Josey Wales and one part Indiana Jones? And doesn't the specter of the ancient Greeks noticeably hover over the everlasting battles being fought among the various neighbors?
 
The Princess of Mars,  the first work by Burroughs ever published, began being serialized in 1912 and was issued as a novel six years later. Neatly, the author has been brought onstage here in an 1881 framing device, as the young nephew of the just-deceased adventurer John Carter who has been called to New York City to be shown a journal the dead man has intended for Edgar's eyes only.

As in Burroughs' story, Carter is a Confederate soldier drawn west after the Civil War by the lure of gold. But no sooner does he find it than he happens upon a cave massively feared by the Indians, one which serves as a portal to a place that looks very much like the American West but is, in fact, the desert-like Barsoom, that fourth planet in the solar system that has often been fantasized about as a possible home to some form of life.
 
The first species Carter encounters when he awakens are just-hatching critters that grow up to become Tharks: thin, tusked, six-limbed, greenish-skinned creatures that are quite jumpy about being in year one thousand of their struggle with the nasties from Zodanga, whose arrogant prince, Sab Than (Dominic West), has just acquired a new, lethal amulet. The Zodangans hover about aboard giant airborne craft that look like Star Wars  by way of Baron von Munchausen and are accompanied by three holy men, most notably the all-knowing and shape-shifting Matai Shang (Mark Strong).
 
Even though they're allied with the aristocrats of Helium — whose elite, including the Jeddak (Ciaran Hinds) and his daughter Princess Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins), are kitted out with British accents, chintzy costumes and the occasional bad wig reminiscent of a 1950s Ray Harryhausen adventure — the poor Tharks desperately need more help if they hope to survive. When they see how Carter can leap tall rocks in a single bound, by virtue of the thin atmospheric conditions, they decide he's their man.
 
It would take repeated viewings to determine how many times Carter is captured and then escapes in the story line devised by screenwriters Andrew Stanton, Mark Andrews and Michael Chabon. More a series of incidents than a gracefully composed drama of rhythmic arcs and elegantly defined acts, the film finally settles its principal attention on the dilemma of Princess Dejah, whose high-minded scientific orientation (reminiscent of that of Rachel Weisz's Hypatia in Agora ) contributes to her disinclination to play obedient daughter and marry the venal Sab Than for political reasons, as her father requests. With Kitsch and Collins having shared a previous life together in X-Men Origins: Wolverine,  their characters here bask in the sight of two moons as they compare notes on the structure of the solar system and, in an appealingly unconventional, unsentimental way, get together.
 
Stanton, who directed Finding Nemo  and WALL-E, co-directed A Bug's Life  and had a hand in writing all three Toy Story  features, here follows Brad Bird by three months in moving from Pixar animated eminence to live-action fare. Although the result is quite a mishmash, dramatic coherence prevails over visual flair; the colors, skin tones, image sharpness and cohesion of diverse pictorial elements are less than stellar, though the 3D is effective, with comparatively little brightness sacrificed by donning glasses. (The film was reviewed in Imax 3D.) For a Pixar graduate piece, humor is notably lacking.
 
Long-haired, bearded and skimpily clad through most of it, Kitsch fills the action-hero bill, neither more nor less. With raven-black hair framing lagoon-blue eyes, Collins, who was an arrestingly unconventional Portia in The Merchant of Venice  with Al Pacino eight years ago, also was a far from predictable Hollywood-style choice here, so sharply does she attack a standard-issue part. In support, Strong and James Purefoy, the latter as a lightly impudent factotum from Helium, supply the most color.
 


Opens: Friday, March 9 (Disney)

 Production: Walt Disney Pictures
 Cast: Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins, Samantha Morton, Willem Dafoe, Thomas Haden Church, Mark Strong, Ciaran Hinds, Dominic West, James Purefoy, Bryan Cranston, Polly Walker, Daryl Sabara
 Director: Andrew Stanton
 Screenwriters: Andrew Stanton, Mark Andrews, Michael Chabon, based on the story A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs
 Producers: Jim Morris, Lindsey Collins, Colin Wilson
 Director of photography: Dan Mindel
 Production designer: Nathan Crowley
 Costume designer: Mayes C. Rubeo
 Editor: Eric Zumbrunnen
 Music: Michael Giacchino
 PG-13, 130 minutes
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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The Canadian with his...
hockey stick!

 :laugh: :laugh: 8) 8)
[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tumg1si1CM&feature=relmfu[/youtube]
Uploaded by DisneyMovieTrailers on Mar 1, 2012



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1pXMuK1KuQ&feature=relmfu[/youtube]
Uploaded by DisneyMovieTrailers on Mar 1, 2012


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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So I gather these stories are considered "science fiction," but from what I'm reading in this thread, they sound more like fantasy to me. I never heard of them before this thread and earlier mentions of the movie. Everybody I knew when I was growing up was into Aztecs and Mayans and hobbits (oh, my!).
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://movies.nytimes.com/2012/03/09/movies/john-carter-with-taylor-kitsch-and-lynn-collins.html



Movie Review
The Wild, Wild West
of a Certain Red Planet

‘John Carter,’ With Taylor Kitsch and Lynn Collins
By A. O. SCOTT
Published: March 8, 2012



Willem Dafoe voices a noble Martian, left, befriended by Taylor Kitsch as the title character
in “John Carter.”



The cast of “John Carter” includes a bunch of actors best known for the parts they play on television — Detective McNulty from “The Wire,” Walter White from “Breaking Bad” and, most prominently, Tim Riggins from “Friday Night Lights” (Texas forever!) — but the movie itself evokes a much older vintage of popular culture. Directed by the Pixar fixture Andrew Stanton (“Finding Nemo,” “Wall-E”) and based on a 1912 magazine serial by Edgar Rice Burroughs, it is a potpourri of arcane and familiar genres. “Mash-up” doesn’t begin to capture this hectic hybrid; it’s more like a paintball fight.

Messy and chaotic, in other words, but also colorful and kind of fun. The movie begins in an atmosphere of Victorian spookiness: an old manse with dark paneling, a sealed tomb out back and many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore piled up in the study. In the blink of an eye we’re in Arizona Territory just after the Civil War, which is to say classic western territory, with monumental rock formations, beleaguered cavalrymen, bellicose Apaches and a dark saloon into which a taciturn stranger comes a-moseying.

That would be John Carter himself (Taylor Kitsch), a Confederate veteran with a knack for mortal combat and a gloomy aversion to same. But the fight finds him, first in a box canyon on loan from a John Ford picture and then — nonspoiler alert! — on Mars. The red planet resembles the Old West both geologically (a lot of dusty red rocks) and thematically.

A Civil War rages between two factions of Red Men, though it is actually the green, four-armed humanoids known as Tharks who serve the traditional western function of Indians, Noble Savages trying to fight back against a technologically superior foe. The war between the city-states of Helium and Zodanga is more like something out of “Star Trek,” but with elements of the sword-and-sandals epics of the 1950s, what with the togas and the armor, the pillars and the pageantry and the ripely histrionic dialogue.

Which I would be happy to quote at length, if my spellchecker didn’t keep decorating Martian words with squiggly red lines. The bodies and faces of the non-Thark Martians, by the way, are adorned with many such lines, though their blood is literally blue. I would also be glad to elaborate further on the intricacies of Martian culture and biology, except that a) I can’t read the notes I took while wearing 3-D glasses; and b) none of it makes much sense anyway.

And that is just fine. Edgar Rice Burroughs was not J. R. R. Tolkien, or even J. K. Rowling. He was less concerned with constructing a coherent fantasy world than with stringing together as many sensational adventures as he could, and Mr. Stanton (who wrote the screenplay with Mark Andrews and Michael Chabon) follows his example.

Carter, stripped of his shirt and endowed with extraordinary leaping ability (something to do with gravity), befriends some noble Tharks (voiced by Willem Dafoe and Samantha Morton), acquires a loyal Martian “monster dog” and falls in love with a Heliumese (Heliumian?) princess named Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins), who is both a fierce sword fighter and a big shot at the Helium Academy of Science.

There is more. There is nothing but more: a huge cast, soaring digital architecture, creatures both adorable and fearsome, lines of dialogue (“Thurns are a myth!”) made even more ridiculous by being uttered in earnest. The silliness — much of which is clearly intentional — is blended with some genuine grandeur.

The Pixar touch is evident in the precision of the visual detail and in the wit and energy of Michael Giacchino’s score, but the quality control that has been exercised over this project also has a curiously undermining effect. The movie eagerly sells itself as semitrashy, almost-campy fun, but it is so lavish and fussy that you can’t help thinking that it wants to be taken seriously, and therefore you laugh at, rather than with, its mock sublimity.

This may be a sign of the times, and a problem of scale. “John Carter” tries to evoke, to reanimate, a fondly recalled universe of B-movies, pulp novels and boys’ adventure magazines. But it pursues this modest goal according to blockbuster logic, which buries the easy, scrappy pleasures of the old stuff in expensive excess. A bad movie should not look this good.

“John Carter” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned). Much Martian blood (blue and otherwise) is spilled.



John Carter

Opens on Friday nationwide.

Directed by Andrew Stanton; written by Mr. Stanton, Mark Andrews and Michael Chabon, based on the story “The Princess of Mars” by Edgar Rice Burroughs; director of photography, Dan Mindel; edited by Eric Zumbrunnen; production design by Nathan Crowley; costumes by Mayes C. Rubeo; music by Michael Giacchino; special effects supervisor, Chris Corbould; produced by Jim Morris, Colin Wilson and Lindsey Collins; released by Walt Disney Pictures. Running time: 2 hours 17 minutes.

WITH: Taylor Kitsch (John Carter), Lynn Collins (Dejah Thoris), Samantha Morton (Sola), Willem Dafoe (Tars Tarkas), Dominic West (Sab Than), Mark Strong (Matai Shang), Thomas Haden Church (Tal Hajus), Ciaran Hinds (Tardos Mors), James Purefoy (Kantos Kahn), Daryl Sabara (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Polly Walker (Sarkoja) and Bryan Cranston (Powell).


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
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Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/movies/2012/03/john_carter_starring_taylor_kitsch_reviewed.html


Riggins and Aliens
Taylor Kitsch stars in the space Western John Carter
By Dana Stevens
Posted Thursday, March 8, 2012, at 7:57 PM ET





Andrew Stanton’s John Carter  (Disney) comes into theaters trailing a cartload of production-history baggage. This would-be tentpole action picture—a retro-sci-fi fantasy based on a 1917 novel by Tarzan  author Edgar Rice Burroughs—has bounced between studios and from one big-name director to another, until finally Disney bought the rights and gave it to Stanton (best known for his animation work at Pixar, including Wall-E and Finding Nemo). The result is a strange, at times misshapen, but somehow lovable thing: a movie that keeps trying to be smaller and simpler than its $250 million special-effects budget will permit. Buried within this bloated, CGI-crammed, unnecessarily 3D-ified monster is a bare-bones space western, the movie that last year’s Cowboys and Aliens  should have been. And though that smaller movie within the movie isn’t allowed to surface often enough, what we do see of it is sufficiently winning that we keep waiting around, looking forward to its next appearance.

John Carter  starts off unpromisingly with not one but two overlong frame-story setups. The first involves a singularly unthrilling Martian air battle between two bird-like supercrafts manned by soldiers in armor reminiscent of ancient Rome, or at least movies about it. The second and more interesting framing device takes us to New York City in 1881, where the young, wide-eyed Edgar Rice Burroughs (played by Daryl Sabara) unexpectedly inherits the vast estate of his late uncle, the eccentric amateur archeologist John Carter. Going through Carter’s papers, Burroughs discovers a journal that begins by warning the reader (in slightly more formal Victorian language) to prepare to have his mind blown.

It’s not till then, in a flashback, that we finally meet John Carter, and the movie snaps to attention. Or maybe that was just all the straight women and gay men in the theater snapping to attention, since Carter is played by Taylor Kitsch, the blunt-featured, compactly buff, curiously irresistible actor who played the high-school football star Tim Riggins in Friday Night Lights.  Carter is a Confederate Civil War veteran who’s now making a living prospecting gold in the American West. He’s tough (as we learn in a redundant series of fight scenes) and stubborn (as proven by his refusal to enlist in the Apache-fighting cavalry at the behest of an insistent colonel played by Bryan Cranston).

This review would quickly get as overstuffed as the movie if I took the time to explain how Carter gets from a prison cell in the Arizona Territory to the surface of Mars (he finds a magic medallion that transports him there through a space wormhole, OK?). But once he arrives on that planet’s mysteriously oxygen-rich surface, the movie achieves its maximum buoyancy— as does Carter, who learns to harness the gravity of Mars to become an expert leaper.
 
This middle section, in which both Carter and the audience get a crash course in the politics, history, and theology of the Red Planet, is the movie at its most imaginative and most fun. Carter is first taken in by the Tharks, a race of six-limbed reptilian beings who are dissuaded from killing him by their wise leader Tars Tarkas (voiced by Willem Dafoe). Carter soon learns that Mars (known to its inhabitants as Barsoom) also hosts two humanoid populations who are at war with each other for control of the planet. The two city-states are named, wonderfully, Helium and Zodanga; the princess of Helium, Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins) is engaged to the prince of Zodanga, Sab Than (Dominic West), but, desperate to avoid this forced marriage, she’s run away to seek help in defeating the evil Zodangans.

All this Burroughsian lingo washes pleasantly over the viewers’ ears; you don’t need to get exactly what the Holy Therns are (some sort of order of shape-shifting immortal priests) to know that it’s cool when a baldheaded Mark Strong appears out of nowhere in flowing gray robes to expound on Martian cosmology. At its best, John Carter  resembles the kind of movie Raiders of the Lost Ark  was made to pay homage to, a rollicking, pleasantly predictable Saturday-afternoon serial. And the fantastical creatures of Mars—the green-skinned, 15-foot-tall Tharks, the massive albino apes who take Carter on in gladiatorial combat, and a sort of chubby half-dog, half-dinosaur that Carter adopts as a pet—are appealingly old-fashioned, like a digitally enhanced version of the stop-motion monsters Ray Harryhausen fashioned for movies like Jason and the Argonauts.

The film’s last third overestimates the viewer’s patience for extended battle scenes, grand CGI-augmented processions, and pseudoscientific mumbo-jumbo. But it’s to the credit of the screenwriters (Stanton, Mark Andrews and the fantasy-friendly novelist Michael Chabon) that underneath the layers of cheese is a strangely believable romance between the taciturn earthling John Carter and the fiery Martian princess Dejah. Collins, a Cate Blanchett lookalike who made a memorable Portia in 2004’s The Merchant of Venice,  has a serene, poised presence even in the goofy midriff-baring costumes she’s forced to wear; like Carrie Fisher’s Princess Leia, her Dejah is a worthy warrior and ally, not just interstellar arm candy. And Taylor Kitsch may not have the broadest range as an actor, but there’s something endearingly sincere about his performance. He takes his job as an action hero seriously and never hints that he’s ironically slumming, even when emerging from the innards of a giant ape drenched in royal-blue blood.
 
I only wish John Carter  had had the courage of its convictions, and not tried to be all things to all demographics. At heart, this is a niche movie for lovers of literary science fiction; it’s clear that Stanton’s intention was to create a rich, internally coherent fantasy universe, the way Peter Jackson did in the Lord of The Rings  films or George Lucas did in the first Star Wars  trilogy. The film should also have kept the working title that it shyly reveals only before the final credits: John Carter of Mars.  It’s that unexpected juxtaposition—the ordinary guy who finds his inner hero when he wakes up on the wrong planet—that lends this overlong but sweet-spirited movie its charm.

"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Ok, which one--
--is the prettier?
Hard to tell!

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:


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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/03/the-hokey-fun-of-john-carter/254214/


The Hokey Fun of 'John Carter'
Disney's updating of the Edgar Rice Burroughs sci-fi classic
embraces its own ridiculousness


By Christopher Orr
Mar 9 2012, 8:01 AM ET





You can take the boy out of Pixar, but can you take Pixar out of the boy? That question was raised last year by Mission: Impossible-Ghost Protocol  and now by John Carter, the first two big live-action films to be directed by members of Pixar's enviable stable of writer/producer/directors. The provisional answer, I'm happy to report, is no—or at least, not entirely.

The Pixarian in question this time is Andrew Stanton, who, in addition to directing Finding Nemo  and Wall-E, essentially served as the studio's in-house screenwriter on its first five films, and has played some role (executive producer, voice actor) in every Pixar film save Cars 2.  As a movie, John Carter  is not near the level of Stanton's Pixar work—but then, how could it be? The studio's magic is in large part the result of its collaborative ethos and the animators' freedom from the demands of a live-action shooting schedule. Still, the modest charms of John Carter  are another reminder that Pixar's success is due not merely to a triumph of process, but to a collection of exceptional individual filmmakers.

The first installment of the John Carter  saga, upon which the movie is loosely based, was penned by Edgar Rice Burroughs (of Tarzan  fame) 100 years ago. Entitled Under the Moons of Mars  when it was first published serially, and retitled A Princess of Mars  when it was later released as a novel, it is an ur-text of modern genre fiction—pulp, science, fantasy, and superhero—an important forebear not only of Superman  but of Brave New World  as well. It is, however, by any objective measure, an awful book: inert in style, haphazard in plot, and woefully, annihilatingly devoid of humor. Given such source material, Stanton's John Carter  might easily have been the kind of glum, tooth-clenchingly self-serious "entertainment" of which we have seen so much in recent years.

But it's not. Rather, Stanton embraces the inescapable ridiculousness of his premise and adds several additional doses of likable whimsy.

Said premise is that, in 1868, a former Confederate cavalryman named John Carter (Taylor Kitsch) is prospecting for gold in Arizona when he is unexpectedly transported to Mars—or Barsoom, as it is known to the natives. (The name sounds rather like an exotic scent for men—sandalwood, perhaps?—though the resonance is presumably unintentional.) A war is taking place between two cities with heavily tattooed human-like inhabitants: Helium (the good guys, devoted to peace and science) and Zodanga (the bad guys, devoted to conquest and pillage). You can probably guess which side is winning. What neither side knows is that both are being manipulated by a race of immortal, unimaginably advanced beings called the Therns, who thrive on conflict.

John Carter, meanwhile, finds himself in different company altogether, as a captive of the decidedly inhuman Tharks—primitive, martial creatures with green skin, four arms, and tusks. Luckily for him, he quickly discovers that, thanks to the weaker gravity of Mars, he is imbued with superhuman strength and the ability to jump great distances (the latter trait destined to be rather over-utilized by the filmmakers). Will John Carter impress the Tharks with his cunning and prowess? Will he aid Helium in its fight for survival? Will he and the lovely princess of Helium (Lynn Collins) wind up smooching? The answers are unlikely to surprise you.

High-tech/low-tech, sci-fi/western hybrids of this kind inevitably find themselves in dangerous territory—Cowboys & Aliens territory, Wild Wild West  territory. Moreover, the plot of John Carter,  if you have not already surmised as much, is not a selling point for the film. (Though it bears noting that, goofy as it is, it makes a great deal more sense in Stanton's telling than it did in Burroughs's.) The action sequences are for the most part unremarkable and in many cases resemble scenes from the Star Wars  movies to a degree that teeters between homage and plagiarism. And while there are some nice, painterly backgrounds on display throughout the film, the special effects are hardly cutting edge.

Yet despite such shortcomings, there is a hokey charm to John Carter,  a clear understanding that, at the end of the day, we are there to have fun. Stanton has scattered throughout the script a surprising number of genuinely witty moments. (I laughed more during the film than I did during Adam Sandler's last three comedies combined—which is a long way of saying, I laughed.) And his cast delivers performances ranging from the entirely solid to the rather good.

In the first category are the two leads, Kitsch (from Friday Night Lights ) and Collins (the doomed love-interest/character-motivation in X-Men Origins: Wolverine ). Neither wows, but neither disappoints, and Kitsch offers an unexpected hint of Timothy Olyphant's lupine appeal. Moreover, the film's performances improve as we move out from the center. Dominic West and Mark Strong are deep in their comfort zones as, respectively, the sneering, treacherous warlord of Zodanga and the quietly malevolent leader of the Thenns. Willem Dafoe has a number of the movie's better jokes as the voice of Tars Tarkas, the Thark chieftain; and James Purefoy, as a warrior of Helium, has perhaps the best.

But the most indelible performance in the film is not, strictly speaking, a performance at all. Rather it is—perhaps appropriately—a feat of animation. This would be Woola, a six-legged, razor-toothed Martian hound who serves as John Carter's captor and later companion, and who rather resembles a cross between a bulldog and a fetal gila monster. As you might imagine, he's not much in the looks department, but it's been some time since cinema has seen a more adorable sidekick. Late in the film, Strong's cold-blooded Thenn warns Carter against taking sides in the war between Helium and Zodanga, explaining, "You don't have a dog in this fight." He's wrong, of course, in every way.
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Who Knew?? Dep't

 :o :o ??? ???  ::) ::)



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_of_Mars

Princess of Mars
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Princess of Mars  is a 2009 direct-to-DVD science fiction film made by American independent studio The Asylum, based on the 1917 novel A Princess of Mars  by author Edgar Rice Burroughs [and starring American actor (and Calvin Klein model) Antonio Sabato, Jr. as well as actress Traci Lords]. The story has inspired some elements of James Cameron's Avatar, as mentioned on the film's promotional art. It is not to be confused with the higher-budget 2012 film John Carter, which is also an adaptation of the novel.



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-x5zZ6rIVc&feature=related[/youtube]



[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YO5RC-qeGqY[/youtube]
::) ::) ::)
 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:


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Offline oilgun

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OMG! Antonio Sabato Junior back when he was hot!  Too bad he couldn't act though, lol!

I so wanted to see John Carter, Taylor Kitsch is such a hockey hottie, but then I read this review by The Globe & Mail's Rick Groen.  I think I'll pass:


[...]
But the irony is obvious: At this point in the history of pulp, it’s the original that seems derivative. Neither the writers nor Stanton have done anything to address that problem, with the inevitable result that our eyes glaze over when the action heats up. A century ago, Burroughs’s imaginative brand of silliness was unique; now, when silliness abounds, it’s just trite.

Our slumbering interest does get ramped up at the finale, although no thanks to Kitsch, whose inflections remain as flat as ever. Then again, perhaps we shouldn’t slight him, because here at last the symmetry is perfect. His John Carter does what John Carter is – it’s an epic delivered in a monotone.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/movies/john-carter-two-epic-hours-of-cgi-enhanced-yawning/article2361962/

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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OMG! Antonio Sabato Junior back when he was hot!  Too bad he couldn't act though, lol!

I so wanted to see John Carter, Taylor Kitsch is such a hockey hottie, but then I read this review by The Globe & Mail's Rick Groen.  I think I'll pass:




"I will not only survive,
I will earn your respect, Gil!"
--Taylor Kitsch



:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



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Offline oilgun

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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Reviews were not as blistering as some had expected, but they were not good, with critics calling the film a hectic hybrid of other movies: “Avatar” meets “Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace” meets “Gladiator” meets “Prince of Persia” meets any of John Ford’s westerns. Mr. Stanton has two “John Carter” sequels planned, but those ambitions are now almost assuredly derailed.




http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/12/business/media/ishtar-lands-on-mars.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=all
 


‘Ishtar’ Lands on Mars
By BROOKS BARNES
Published: March 11, 2012



The science-fiction film “John Carter,” starring Taylor Kitsch, cost an estimated $350 million
to make and market.




Andrew Stanton, the director of “John Carter.”



"Finding Nemo" is among Mr. Stanton's string of movie successes at Pixar.



LOS ANGELES — In 1987, shortly before the release of “Ishtar,” Columbia Pictures realized the film was going to flop in catastrophic fashion. But rather than cut advertising spending to minimize the financial damage — as the studio’s top marketer advised — Columbia did the opposite, pouring even more money into ads.

The reason? The studio was desperate to stay on good terms with the two stars of “Ishtar,” Warren Beatty and Dustin Hoffman. “Ego trumps logic in Hollywood,” said Peter Sealey, who was Columbia’s marketing chief at the time.

Studios have repeatedly pledged in the 25 years since to modernize their clubby business practices, but the more Hollywood promises change, the deeper it seems to fall into its ruts — as evidenced by “John Carter,” a big-budget science fiction epic from Walt Disney Studios that opened Friday and flopped over the weekend. Disney spent lavishly (some say foolishly) on the movie in large part to appease one of its most important creative talents: Andrew Stanton, the Pixar-based director of “Finding Nemo” and “Wall-E.”

“John Carter,” which cost an estimated $350 million to make and market, and was directed by Mr. Stanton, took in about $30.6 million at the North American box office, according to Rentrak, which compiles box-office data. That result is so poor that analysts estimate that Disney will be forced to take a quarterly write-down of $100 million to $165 million. The amount will depend on ticket sales overseas, where “John Carter” took in about $71 million over the weekend, a better total than Disney had feared.

Profitability for “John Carter” was always a steep climb. Because of its enormous cost and the way ticket sales are split with theaters, analysts say the film needs to take in more than $600 million globally to break even. The only silver lining for Disney may be a dubious one: last March the studio’s “Mars Needs Moms” flopped so badly that it also required a write-down, making year-on-year performance comparisons less brutal.

In recent weeks, as a weak marketing campaign failed to generate audience excitement for “John Carter,” Robert A. Iger, Disney’s chief executive, made it clear in conversations with senior managers that he would not tolerate finger-pointing; this may be a colossal miss, he told them, according to people who were present, but it’s the company’s miss and no individuals would be blamed — including Mr. Stanton. Learn from it, was Mr. Iger’s message.

On Sunday, Rich Ross, chairman of Walt Disney Studios, said in a statement, “Moviemaking does not come without risk.  It’s still an art, not a science, and there is no proven formula for success. Andrew Stanton is an incredibly talented and successful filmmaker who with his team put their hard work and vision into the making of ‘John Carter.’ Unfortunately, it failed to connect with audiences as much as we had all hoped.”

Mr. Stanton declined to comment for this article.

It is true that no one mistake created “John Carter.” Still, interviews with current and former Disney executives paint a relatively stark portrait of responsibility, starting with Mr. Stanton and extending to studio managers — many of them inexperienced in their jobs — who gave him creative carte blanche. Although Mr. Stanton was promised independence, his contract did not give him what Hollywood calls final cut, or complete control over the finished film.

Mr. Stanton received a green light to proceed on “John Carter” in 2009 by Richard W. Cook, then Disney’s studio chairman. There were red flags from the beginning.

Mr. Stanton had never directed a live-action movie before. He wanted to cast no-name actors. And the screenplay, based on a story by Edgar Rice Burroughs that was serialized in 1912 and later published in book form as “A Princess of Mars,” was a bewildering mash-up, starting during the Civil War and moving to the Old West before leaping to a planet called Barsoom (Mars), home to tusked, four-armed creatures called Tharks.

But Mr. Stanton passionately lobbied to make the movie, and there was a compelling argument to say yes, Disney officials said. His story pitch was simple and gripping: “Indiana Jones on Mars.” Big payoffs in the movie business typically come from big gambles, and the thinking among some at the studio was that this could be Disney’s “Avatar.”

Moreover, Mr. Stanton, whose writing credits include “Monsters, Inc.” and all three “Toy Story” movies, had a strong track record with difficult material. People were skeptical about “Wall-E,” about a computer that does not talk, but Mr. Stanton turned it into a blockbuster with more than $521 million in global ticket sales. There were also prerelease doubts about “Finding Nemo,” which took in $868 million. Both won Oscars.

Didn’t he deserve the benefit of the doubt?

If Disney gave Mr. Stanton rope, he certainly ran with it. Accustomed to reworking scenes over and over at Pixar, he did not take well to the usual constraints of live-action — nailing it the first time — and went back for at least two lengthy reshoots. “The thing I had to explain to Disney was, ‘You’re asking a guy who’s only known how to do it this way to suddenly do it with one reshoot,’ ” he told The Los Angeles Times.  “I said, ‘I’m not gonna get it right the first time. I’ll tell you that right now.’ ”

Mr. Stanton leaned heavily on his colleagues at Disney-owned Pixar for guidance, paying less attention to input from people with experience in live-action filmmaking, according to people who worked on the movie.

To be fair, though, Disney managers did not have a wealth of live-action experience on which to draw. Mr. Iger had fired Mr. Cook (for reasons unrelated to “John Carter”) and replaced him with Rich Ross, a television executive. Mr. Ross, who arrived shortly before Mr. Stanton began filming, had never overseen production of a big-budget movie before. Mr. Ross hired lieutenants who were also inexperienced in managing filmmakers, notably Sean Bailey as head of production and MT Carney as marketing chief.

Supporters of Mr. Ross concede that he faced a steep learning curve, but insist he had no choice but to let Mr. Stanton proceed; “John Carter” had been in preproduction for a year by the time he arrived. They pointed to Mr. Ross’s recent standoff with Gore Verbinski over the budget of a “Lone Ranger” remake as evidence that he can stand up to strong-willed directors — and jolt the studio out of its rut — when necessary.

Regardless, when push came to shove on “John Carter,” Mr. Stanton usually got his way. One area in which he exerted his influence was marketing, where he frequently rejected ideas from Ms. Carney and her team, according to people who worked on the film.

He insisted, for instance, that a Led Zeppelin song be used in a trailer, rejecting concerns that a decades-old rock tune did not make the material feel current. Mr. Stanton also was behind the selection of billboard imagery that fell flat, and he controlled an important presentation of footage at a Disney fan convention that got a chilly reception.

By the time “John Carter” had its Los Angeles premiere last month, the film had suffered months of ridicule on the Internet and had taken on a funereal aura. “I’ve never had something healthy get treated like a corpse,” Mr. Ross told Variety.  Mr. Stanton brushed off skeptics at the premiere, saying, “You just gotta trust us.”

Reviews were not as blistering as some had expected, but they were not good, with critics calling the film a hectic hybrid of other movies: “Avatar” meets “Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace” meets “Gladiator” meets “Prince of Persia” meets any of John Ford’s westerns. Mr. Stanton has two “John Carter” sequels planned, but those ambitions are now almost assuredly derailed.

If Mr. Stanton has any comfort, it may be that he keeps good company in the trophy-movie-gone-wrong hall of fame. Baz Luhrmann is there for “Australia,” along with George Lucas for “Howard the Duck” and Michael Cimino for “Heaven’s Gate.” And, of course, Mr. Hoffman and Mr. Beatty for “Ishtar.”
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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I don't suppose the movie ever bothers to explain how John Carter gets to Barsoom? Or why? He just sort of gets there, like Mark Twain's Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court, because he needs to be there, or there is no story/movie?  ???

And if "Edgar Rice Burroughs" finds a manuscript or diary, he must get back. Somehow. ...

Could this movie have been saved by better promotion? More pictures of Taylor Kitsch, shirtless and looking heroic?
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Meryl

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This still sounds like a nice afternoon diversion mit popcorn.  Maybe after the 18th, when my show is finally open, I'll give it a shot.  8)
Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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This still sounds like a nice afternoon diversion mit popcorn.  Maybe after the 18th, when my show is finally open, I'll give it a shot.  8)


Let's, shall we??!

 :D

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Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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I don't suppose the movie ever bothers to explain how John Carter gets to Barsoom? Or why? He just sort of gets there, like Mark Twain's Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court, because he needs to be there, or there is no story/movie?  ???


In the original  story, supposedly--wait for it!--by telegraph  (but wirelessly)!

I think.

Hey, the first book was written in 1912!

 :laugh:
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Offline Meryl

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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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I don't suppose the movie ever bothers to explain how John Carter gets to Barsoom?

In the original  story, supposedly--wait for it!--by telegraph  (but wirelessly)!
I think.
Hey, the first book was written in 1912!
 :laugh:

 :laugh:
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.