Author Topic: What do you call that white condiment?  (Read 19433 times)

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2014, 08:06:15 am »
I like Cinco de Mayo best when it falls on a weekend!!

I never do anything for Cinco De Mayo, so it doesn't matter to me when it falls.  I did hear that Cinco De Mayo is now bigger in the US than in Mexico.

:laugh:

Any excuse to party.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2014, 09:23:51 am »
And according to Xaviera Hollander.

Good Lord, is she still around? She must have been writing before the Age of AIDS. "Swallowing" is of uncertain safety and is therefore not advised these days.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2014, 09:25:26 am »
I like Cinco de Mayo best when it falls on a weekend!!

I think I'll observe Star Wars Day this Sunday.

"May the Fourth be with you."

(Thank you, Big Bang Theory.  ;D )
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2014, 09:27:08 am »
The "little upside-down 'e' ", by the way, is called a "shwa"!

Thank you, John. That was the term I couldn't think of.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline x-man

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2014, 09:41:27 am »
"Sing Co Deh My Oh"

Actually closer, City Dweller, if you pronounce the "de' as the English word "they."  I only spoke Spanish extensively in Mexico and southern Spain and northern Morocco, but that's what it was there..  "Cinco" of course rhymes with the English word "pinko.."
Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.  Give him a mask and he will tell you the truth. ---- Oscar Wilde

Offline x-man

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2014, 09:54:29 am »
Actually closer, City Dweller...."


Sorry about the name MB.  Of course I meant CELLAR DWELLER.
Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.  Give him a mask and he will tell you the truth. ---- Oscar Wilde

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2014, 11:58:22 am »
I read recently that 60% of the calories available to consumers in the U.S. are made from two sources: corn (primarily corn syrup) and soy. Most of these are genetically modified. In fact, it's getting really difficult to find corn and soy products from non-GMO sources.

The main difference between Miracle Whip and mayonnaise are the sweeteners: high-fructose corn syrup and sugar are the fourth and fifth ingredients, respectively, of Miracle Whip.

 :o :o :-X :-X :P :P


http://www.neatorama.com/2006/12/22/whats-the-difference-miracle-whip-vs-mayonnaise/#!G9PWS


What's the Difference?
Miracle Whip vs. Mayonnaise

By Alex Santoso
Friday, December 22, 2006 at 3:49 AM




The Dilemma: Two thick white dressings with similar flavor in similar-looking jars are bearing down on you from your refrigerator, and you're asking yourself just one question: "Do I feel lucky?" Well, do ya, punk?

People You Can Impress: deli-goers and anyone killing time in the checkout line.

The Quick Trick: Taste them both side by side. The sweeter one is Miracle Whip.

The Explanation: In 1756, the French under Louis Franšois Armand de Vignerot du Plessis, duc de Richelieu, captured Mahˇn on the Spanish-held island of Minorca. In honor of this victory, the duc's chef created a new dressing for his master: Mahonnaise. It wasn't until 1905, however, at Richard Hellmann's New York deli, that Americans got to taste the goods. But boy, did it catch on! Within seven years, he'd mass-marketed the condiment as Hellmann's Blue Ribbon Mayonnaise.

To be frank, mayo is one of those love-it-or-hate-it things. The lovers know that, in its most authentic form, mayo's a pretty simple affair: raw egg yolks, oil, lemon juice or vinegar, and spices. Not much room for improvement.

But in 1933, Kraft Foods though differently. Inventor Charles Chapman's patented emulsifying machine allowed regular mayonnaise to be evenly blended with cheaper dressings and more than 20 different spices (plus sugar). The result was Miracle Whip, which debuted at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. Promising to create "Salad Miracles with Miracle Whip Salad Dressing," the Whip was an instant hit (Note: It's not known if the dressing is responsible for any non-salad-related miracles.)

The main difference between Miracle Whip and mayonnaise are the sweeteners: high-fructose corn syrup and sugar are the fourth and fifth ingredients, respectively, of Miracle Whip.

And a Word About Grey Poupon: While we're on the subject of condiments, we couldn't resist the opportunity to squeeze in a quick fact about mustard, or more specifically Grey Poupon. While it sounds hoity-toity, the name Grey Poupon isn't so much about the mustard's color as it is the names of two 18th-century big-time mustard firms from Dijon (run by guys cleverly named Maurice Grey and Antoine Poupon). The name can be a bit confusing, and even unappetizing, to French speakers, as poupon means "newborn baby."


May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #27 on: May 02, 2014, 12:15:46 pm »
However you pronounce it, I'm really not particularly fond of it. A BLT without it is unthinkable, and it goes well on a sandwich of turkey, lettuce, and tomato (I guess you could call that a TLT?), but other than those two sandwiches, I don't have much use for it.  :-\

In either case, I would only use Hellman's. That was good enough for my mother, and it's good enough for me.  ;D
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #28 on: May 02, 2014, 11:11:19 pm »
As an aside--or O.T.--this pronunciation question reminds me that when I was a kid, I knew some other kids in my neighborhood whose term for those sticks of colored wax made by Crayola was "crans." They also said they enjoyed "cranning."

I called them "crayons," (pronounced cray-ahns) and the activity was "coloring" (as in "coloring book").
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline milomorris

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Re: What do you call that white condiment?
« Reply #29 on: May 02, 2014, 11:43:23 pm »
I never do anything for Cinco De Mayo, so it doesn't matter to me when it falls.  I did hear that Cinco De Mayo is now bigger in the US than in Mexico.

:laugh:

Any excuse to party.

LOL!!! Exactly.

And I've also been told the same thing about Cinco de Mayo being a bigger deal up here than down there.
  The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

--Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.