Author Topic: Holiday Menus  (Read 69404 times)

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #160 on: November 27, 2019, 06:49:24 pm »
Thanks Chuck, but the slaw doesn't show up. I can't get the link to work in a search either. Dunno why.

does this one work?




Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #161 on: November 27, 2019, 09:00:27 pm »
It works for me!
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #162 on: November 28, 2019, 11:12:14 am »
Me too! That one looks more delicious than the previous one.

The cole in cole slaw refers to cabbage. It comes from the Latin word for cabbage: caulis. Interestingly the word kale, a whole different vegetable, also comes from caulis. Cabbage is usually the foundational vegetable in slaw, although I've seen it made with finely chopped broccoli or other ingredients. Cabbage is particularly well suited for it because it doesn't get soggy as quickly as lettuce. So while a lettuce salad with dressing would probably be inedible the next day, cole slaw is still OK.

I used to make a delicious dish called colcannon, a traditional Irish dish of mashed potatoes and finely chopped cabbage and onions. I added cheese to mine, though I don't think that's a traditional element.

There's a department store chain here named Kohl's, which is the German form of caulis. Either the store is named Cabbage's, or the founder's last name was Cabbage. But they may not have known that, because in modern English the word Kohl has no meaning.

My ex-mother-in-law calls it cold slaw.  ::)




Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #163 on: November 29, 2019, 12:17:53 pm »
How informative, and ended with a laugh! You should do food writing more often, friend!

So how did everyone's menu work out? I'm still working on mine; nine are coming today!

The renter moved out in May, and I've had the house to myself since then!
Too much to do. . .I don't have time to get old!

Offline Sason

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #164 on: November 29, 2019, 04:33:39 pm »
That pic works!

We would call that a salad too, just a different variety than the one in the previous pic.

The Swedish word for cabbage is kål, pronounced much like cole.

Kale (grönkål) and cabbage (vitkål) are related, they both belong to the same family: brassica. As do also e.g. broccoli, cauliflower (blomkål), brussel sprouts (brysselkål), kohl rabi (kålrabbi), among others.

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #165 on: November 29, 2019, 04:59:25 pm »
How informative, and ended with a laugh! You should do food writing more often, friend!

In an amazing coincidence, I was (briefly) a food writer in the mid-'80s. I worked mainly as a feature writer but they didn't have a food writer so part of my job for a year or so was writing a weekly food story with recipes. I took the opportunity to try to make them fun and culturally interesting. But the very first story I wrote was on a topic assigned by my editor and that topic was ... CABBAGE!

My little bit of knowledge of cole/kål, however, I didn't acquire until years later, when I began making colcannon. And I can't even remember where I got that recipe.

And here we are still learning, thanks to Sonja! I guess i knew that some of those cruciferous (shouldn't that word be coleciferous) vegetables were related, but I didn't know the whole list or that cabbage was on it.






Offline Sason

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #166 on: November 29, 2019, 07:04:52 pm »

(shouldn't that word be coleciferous)

 :laugh:

Katherine, the colcannon sounds interesting. I'd be interested in the recipe, if you still have it.

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #167 on: November 29, 2019, 08:01:08 pm »
:laugh:

Katherine, the colcannon sounds interesting. I'd be interested in the recipe, if you still have it.

I'm not sure I ever had it written down, and if so it could be hard to find at this point because I've been packing things up for an eventual move. But here's the gist of it: I would saute an onion in olive oil, add a bag of shredded cabbage until it wilts. Meanwhile, I would boil some potatoes and mash them (so their quantity is a little bigger than the cabbage and onion. I'd mix them together and add grated cheese to taste.

Not exactly glamorous, but tasty and fairly healthy! If you google you'll be able to find online recipes that might be more precise. And I'm not sure cheese is authentic to the original recipe but I liked it.


Offline Sason

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #168 on: November 29, 2019, 08:51:18 pm »
Thanks!

It sounds like good everyday food.

I'll try it, maybe tomorrow.

I imagine a dollop of butter won't hurt....  ::)

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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Holiday Menus
« Reply #169 on: November 30, 2019, 09:26:28 am »
It sounds like good everyday food.

Exactly. Everyday ingredients you may already have, not much time or work, satisfying and healthy. Done!

Quote
]I imagine a dollop of butter won't hurt....  ::)

I don't think a dollop of butter has ever hurt anything!  :D

I use butter (and/or milk or cream) when mashing potatoes. But it would be welcome later in the process, too.