615,355 Posts in 14,785 Topics by 2,758 Residents
Latest Member: Ungazintonat
BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
December 11, 2018, 12:18:18 pm

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
*
Home Help Login Register
BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  Our BetterMost Community  |  The Holiday Forum (Moderator: Meryl)  |  Topic: Celebrating the Winter Solstice 0 Residents and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 [23] 24 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Celebrating the Winter Solstice  (Read 68324 times)
southendmd
BetterMost Supporter!
BetterMost Moderator
The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 14,699


well, I won't




Ignore
« Reply #220 on: December 21, 2016, 01:14:54 pm »

It's almost time to celebrate Longerdays!  Cheesy

I put it on the banner!

Welcome to BetterMost!

We celebrate Longerdays,
formerly known as the Winter Solstice
Logged

photobucket sucks
Sason
BetterMost Moderator
BetterMost 5000+ Posts Club
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9,954


Bork bork bork




Ignore
« Reply #221 on: December 21, 2016, 04:40:39 pm »

Someone posted this (I cleaned up most of the errors):

An old Persian tradition. Persian people celebrate the longest night with fruits like pomegranate and watermelon and all kinds of mixed nuts and dried fruit, reading poems all night long. An ancient tradition to celebrate the longest night and birthday of the sun as days will get longer next morning. It is called Yalda night.

Ha! I just heard about this on the radio a couple of hours ago!

They interviewed the head of the Iranian association here, and he said exactly that!
Logged


Düva pööp is a förce of natüre
brian
BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1,375





Ignore
« Reply #222 on: December 21, 2016, 05:36:54 pm »

Of course it is midsummer here in  Sydney so sunset at 8.06pm and sunrise at 5.41. Back home in Dunedin sunset is 9.29pm and sunrise at 5.44am.

However
On June 24 next year I will be in Fairbanks, Alaska where I see sunset is at 12.47am and sunrise at 3am with the "rest" of the night just twilight.
So no winter solstice for me until mid 2018.
Logged
Jeff Wrangler
BetterMost Supporter!
The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 26,411


"Tom Cody. Pleased to meet ya."




Ignore
« Reply #223 on: December 21, 2016, 07:15:26 pm »

It's already winter here! I'd like to light a candle at sunset, but I won't be home until after dark.  Sad

As soon as I got home, to honor the solstice I lit a soy candle with a spruce scent. My place smells wonderful!  Cheesy
Logged

"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.
Front-Ranger
BetterMost Moderator
The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24,432


I'm marching for her!




Ignore
« Reply #224 on: December 22, 2016, 11:55:13 am »

Of course it is midsummer here in  Sydney so sunset at 8.06pm and sunrise at 5.41. Back home in Dunedin sunset is 9.29pm and sunrise at 5.44am.

However
On June 24 next year I will be in Fairbanks, Alaska where I see sunset is at 12.47am and sunrise at 3am with the "rest" of the night just twilight.
So no winter solstice for me until mid 2018.

You just answered a longstanding question of mine, whether people in Australia and environs call our summer winter and our winter summer. And, they do!!
Logged

May 2018 be better for us all.
Front-Ranger
BetterMost Moderator
The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24,432


I'm marching for her!




Ignore
« Reply #225 on: December 21, 2017, 08:30:34 pm »

Do LED candles count in solstice celebrations?
Logged

May 2018 be better for us all.
serious crayons
BetterMost Moderator
The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 17,769





Ignore
« Reply #226 on: December 22, 2017, 10:03:17 am »

You just answered a longstanding question of mine, whether people in Australia and environs call our summer winter and our winter summer. And, they do!!

I always wonder that, too. Do they think of summer as a cold season and winter as warm -- or are summer and winter universal terms for warm season and cold season, respectively? Now we know it's the latter.

I think I asked Sheyne this question long ago, got an answer, but then forgot it.


Logged
brian
BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1,375





Ignore
« Reply #227 on: December 22, 2017, 01:22:51 pm »

The only difference I know is that we say that Summer starts on December 1 and ends on February 28/29. Autumn starts March 1. You seem to start Winter at the solstice December 21/22
Logged
serious crayons
BetterMost Moderator
The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 17,769





Ignore
« Reply #228 on: December 23, 2017, 11:39:16 am »

The only difference I know is that we say that Summer starts on December 1 and ends on February 28/29. Autumn starts March 1. You seem to start Winter at the solstice December 21/22

Correct, the official calendar dates for the respective seasons coincide with the solstices and equinoxes. But people don't really think of them that way. It may be a little personalized and depends slightly on your location, but most people think of winter as December through February, spring as March through May, summer as June through August, fall as September through November.

That leads to much hilarity in broadcast weather segments when the temperature on the "first day of winter" is 10 degrees F below zero, which wouldn't be all that unusual here (this Sunday, the "fourth day of winter," the predicted low is -9F). Likewise the "first day of summer" coming after weeks of heat or the "first day of fall" happening long after the weather has cooled off.

On the other hand, when I lived in New Orleans, where it's 95 degrees through September, it's weird to hear a radio ad for an upcoming "fall festival."

 
Logged
brian
BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1,375





Ignore
« Reply #229 on: December 23, 2017, 02:13:27 pm »

Having lived most of my life in Sydney which has a latitude (34'S) and climate very like Charleston NC, I can appreciate life in New Orleans. For 28 years I lived 80 km inland and at 2000 ft a.s. l so it was not quite so hot and when I moved there it was usually cooler at night but that was changing.
I use to avoid staying overnight at my mother's apartment until after my birthday in mid-March but it was not always avoidable. The nights were so hot. It is why this year I have broken my promise (when I moved) to always return to my sister for Christmas. She lives on the same floor as my mother did but in a bigger apartment. However the spare bedroom is much like my mother's lounge room where I use to sleep with no cross ventilation. I made the definite decision to migrate when on my mother's last New Year's Day it was 46'C (115'F). My mother's oxygen machine broke down (we had to get the cylinders) and they were closing picture theatres due to aircon breaking down.

Now I am in Dunedin (46'S) much like Maine, the maximum temperature ever recorded was 32'C (90'F) however because the landmass of NZ is so much smaller we do not get the cold of Maine. I have not seen it below -2'C (28'F) at my place 300 metres a.s.l but it does get down to -6'C at the airport on the river flat to the south and can be -16'C (3'F) in inland areas of the province which is called Central and about 100km inland.

People are surprised that Dunedin has lower rainfall than Sydney because Sydney receives a lot in thunderstorms when it pelts down. In Dunedin it tends to be just drizzle. Also it is more reliable. Sydney has water storage to last for years (it was 7 years when I was teaching geography but probably much less now due to rising population, they have installed a very expensive water desalination plant). Here in Dunedin we have 3-4 weeks supply  Grin Also water is not metered, there have been no restrictions on use since I lived here but there have been some in the past. Watering gardens was often severely restricted in Sydney (only by hand morning and evening on 2 days per week when I left).
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 [23] 24 Go Up Print 
BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  Our BetterMost Community  |  The Holiday Forum (Moderator: Meryl)  |  Topic: Celebrating the Winter Solstice « previous next »
Jump to:  

Listen to Brokeback Mountain Radio 1
Listen to Brokeback Mountain Radio 1



Help keep this site operating by donating.


 
Web bettermost.net
Image courtesy of 'AuroraLucis'


No more beans.  I'm sick of beans.

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums