Author Topic: Celebrating the Winter Solstice  (Read 177250 times)

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #310 on: December 23, 2020, 11:22:18 am »
I'm sure they all taste good.

But here, there's more or less only one way to cook them.

Oh, I thought you meant your impression was there's only one way to cook them, not just that there's only one way people cook them in Sweden.

Multi-generation Americans must have a lot of those things -- ingredients they cook only one way. Or did, at least, before the growth of Latin American, Middle Eastern, African and Asian restaurants. Though of course, people whose parents came from another country probably ate those all along.

The other day I interviewed a woman whose mother was from the Philippines and was renowned for her cooking of Filipino cuisine. Oone thing her mother made her boyfriends particularly liked was a dish one of them called "mud." It combines pork and ox blood.

Whereas multi-generational American families cook our ox blood only one way. Which is, we don't.

There's only one Filipino restaurant near me, but I don't believe they have mud on the menu.

I just noticed that in two consecutive posts I referred to two delicious foods called mud.


However not in my family since none of my parents grew up in Sweden.

Where was your folks from?



Offline Sason

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #311 on: December 23, 2020, 02:32:58 pm »


Where was your folks from?


Parents from Germany and Denmark.

Grandparents from Poland/Ukraina/Russia/Germany/Denmark.

Like most Jewish families it's a multinational mixture just one or two generations back.

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #312 on: December 24, 2020, 02:32:29 pm »
Parents from Germany and Denmark.

Grandparents from Poland/Ukraina/Russia/Germany/Denmark.

Like most Jewish families it's a multinational mixture just one or two generations back.


Nice! I think even my great-grandparents were all born in the United States. So I don't really know my family's country(ies) of origin. Based on our names and the SPF of our sunscreen, I'm guessing it was some combination of Ireland, England and Scotland.

 


Offline Sason

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Re: Celebrating the Winter Solstice
« Reply #313 on: December 24, 2020, 03:50:35 pm »

Nice! I think even my great-grandparents were all born in the United States. So I don't really know my family's country(ies) of origin. Based on our names and the SPF of our sunscreen, I'm guessing it was some combination of Ireland, England and Scotland.

 :laugh:

That's an inventive way to do genealogy!

Düva pööp is a förce of natüre