Author Topic: Cellar Scribblings  (Read 2916161 times)

Offline brian

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15360 on: January 29, 2018, 10:00:26 pm »
I had to look up what a comforter was. All I could think of was baby's dummy.
I discovered they are what Australians call doonas and Kiwis call duvets. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comforter
 I have had to adjust my language accordingly although saying doona in NZ is understood, just gives my birth country away. Probably the generic term is continental quilt.
I first met such items when I first visited Germany in 1974. They were almost unknown in Australia then but I bought one and have used it ever since. I do not use a top sheet but, of course, have duvet covers which I wash. I do not have to make the bed every day, just shake out the duvet/doona. In German hotels they roll them up but I leave mine laying flat on the bed.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15361 on: January 31, 2018, 11:26:13 am »
"Baby's dummy"?

Is that like a stuffed animal?



Offline brian

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15362 on: January 31, 2018, 02:01:08 pm »

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15363 on: January 31, 2018, 08:20:11 pm »
I love that term for the pacifier, baby's dummy!   It's the first time I've heard it here.

I've heard people here refer to them as a "pucky" or "binkie".


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15364 on: January 31, 2018, 08:48:06 pm »
I've only heard pacifier or binkie. And I actually had babies who used dummies!  :laugh:



Offline brian

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15365 on: January 31, 2018, 09:29:02 pm »
Dummy is the normal world we use. I have heard pacifier but it sounds like somebody trying to be very correct and proper. Never heard the other terms. Wikipedia says Pacifier is American English, Dummy is British English.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15366 on: February 01, 2018, 10:30:07 am »
Dummy is the normal world we use. I have heard pacifier but it sounds like somebody trying to be very correct and proper. Never heard the other terms. Wikipedia says Pacifier is American English, Dummy is British English.

Well, we probably shouldn't get into which sounds more correct and proper, British vs. American!  :laugh:

I thought dummy might mean meant stuffed animal because it's a whole figure with a body and character, like a ventriloquist's dummy. In this context, it doesn't have that meaning and just sounds vaguely insulting.  (You know in America "dummy" is a kind of childish insult to mean "dumb person," right? Maybe it's not over there.)

Binkie is a nickname, but pacifier is the main official word, and obviously it means it pacifies babies. I guess it's kind of correct and proper in that people wouldn't use that as a verb in ordinary conversation. If a baby were crying, you wouldn't hear someone say "Let me try to pacify her."

I was going to say it's like "comforter," but a comforter, though it can be comfortable, isn't really intended to comfort, per se.






Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15367 on: February 01, 2018, 12:47:57 pm »
I thought dummy might mean meant stuffed animal because it's a whole figure with a body and character, like a ventriloquist's dummy. In this context, it doesn't have that meaning and just sounds vaguely insulting.  (You know in America "dummy" is a kind of childish insult to mean "dumb person," right? Maybe it's not over there.)

To add another layer, we have an organization here called the Denver Dumb Friends League. It's been around forever. It's for the benefit of animals who don't talk, thus, are dumb.   :-X
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15368 on: February 01, 2018, 07:04:56 pm »
This reminds me of a story.

My mom was running a day care out of our house, and she had a a few that had binkies.

One family was trying to break their son (Lenny) of the binkie habit.  He was determined he was going to keep it.

One day, he arrived without his binkie, and after Lenny's parents  left, my mom said:   "Lenny, where is your binkie?"

Lenny got wide-eyed and replied  "The mow-mow took it!"

Mom:  "Um....what?"

Lenny:   "The Mow-Mow lives in the cellar, and he eats binkies, so he took my binkie."

We could not BELIEVE his parents told him that.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #15369 on: February 01, 2018, 10:05:41 pm »
This reminds me of a story.

My mom was running a day care out of our house, and she had a a few that had binkies.

One family was trying to break their son (Lenny) of the binkie habit.  He was determined he was going to keep it.

One day, he arrived without his binkie, and after Lenny's parents  left, my mom said:   "Lenny, where is your binkie?"

Lenny got wide-eyed and replied  "The mow-mow took it!"

Mom:  "Um....what?"

Lenny:   "The Mow-Mow lives in the cellar, and he eats binkies, so he took my binkie."

We could not BELIEVE his parents told him that.


I'll have to say that doesn't sound like an entirely bad idea.

Apparently Lenny bought the story. By the time he's old enough to understand anything, he won't remember it. He seems to have accepted it as an adequate explanation of why he can't have the binkie. And if he's old enough to understand supernatural concepts and speak in full sentences, he probably is too old for a binkie anyway.

After all, parents keep up the pretense of Santa Claus until kids figure it out when they're like 8, so this doesn't seem that much different. Except, well, in a scarier way. Now Lenny doesn't just have to worry about a home invasion from one strange man once a year -- now the monster lives in the basement and is there all the time!  :laugh:

Is it possible one of his parents drove over the binkie with a lawnmower? I realize Lenny may have lived in a part of the city where there aren't lawns to mow, so just a thought. If it were a mower, it would fit the story except he'd have confused the cellar and the garage.

Side note: On that other thread, we were discussing American vs. British names for things. I wrote the sentence above before rereading your post and realized I had said "basement" and you had said "cellar." I wonder if that's an East Coast/Midwest linguistic difference. I guess as CellarDweller, you would know!