Author Topic: Ang Ang Ang  (Read 25038 times)

Offline Ellemeno

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Ang Ang Ang
« on: May 15, 2008, 04:35:59 am »
Ang Lee, the Academy Award-winning director of the landmark film Brokeback Mountain, is set to boost gay visibility yet again with the biopic Taking Woodstock. It's based on the memoir by Elliot Tiber, who was instrumental in bringing the famed music festival to a farm in upstate New York. From Tiber's website:

In the summer of 1969, Elliot Tiber's life changed in a way he never could have foreseen. Greenwich Village had become the mecca for gays in America. There, Elliot had socialized with the likes of Truman Capote, Tennessee Williams, Andy Warhol, and a talented young photographer named Robert Mapplethorpe, and yet had managed to keep his gay life a secret from his family. Then on Friday, June 27, Elliot walked into the Stonewall Inn and witnessed the riot that would galvanize the gay movement in the United States. And on July 17, when Elliot read that the Woodstock Concert promoters had lost their license to stage the show in Wallkill, he called to offer his help in finding a new venue. In the days that followed, Elliot found himself swept up in a vortex that would change his life forever.
 
Should be a fascinating movie, and with Ang at the helm, will definitely be visually splendid (this is, after all, the man who made Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), and be gay positive (in addition to Brokeback, he also made the 1993 gay comedy The Wedding Banquet).

With this film, and the upcoming Milk , it's heartening to see great filmmakers looking into our past, and telling the truth about our history.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2009, 12:04:50 pm by Meryl »

Offline Ellemeno

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Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2008, 04:56:12 am »
http://www.cbs6albany.com/news/ang_1255847___article.html/lee_extra.html


Ang Lee film casting locals

June 25, 2008 - 2:32PM
CBS 6 News

Extra, extra! Looking for your fifteen minutes of fame?

Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee ("Brokeback Mountain," "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon") is coming to the area to film his latest movie, and the production company is looking for locals to cast.

"Taking Woodstock," being produced by Focus Films and Tuxedo Terrace, is set in 1969 and follows the story of a man -- an upstate local -- who played an unexpected but pivotal role in the 1969 Woodstock Music and Arts Festival.

Filming is scheduled to begin in mid-August and continue into mid-October in Columbia County.

The production company says it's looking for extras of all types -- college kids, hippies, townspeople, police, etc. Long hair is a plus.

Schedule of open casting calls:

Saturday, June 28th
10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Montgomery C. Smith Middle School
215 Harry Howard Ave.
Hudson, NY 12534

Sunday, June 29th
10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
College of St. Rose Event and Athletics Center
420 Western Ave.
Albany, NY 12203

Monday, June 30th and Tuesday, July 1st
10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Church of the Immaculate Conception
732 US Route 20
New Lebanon, NY 12125

Candidates must be legal U.S. residents and are asked to bring a recent non-returnable photograph.

Extras will be paid.

The company is also looking for cars made in 1969 and earlier. Anyone interested is asked to bring a picture of the car with a brief description of make, model and current condition.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2008, 06:22:09 pm by Elle »

Offline Ellemeno

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Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2008, 05:52:18 am »
http://blogs.timesunion.com/movies/?p=207


Wanted: Fabulous, furry freaks
June 25, 2008 at 10:50 am by Casey Seiler, Entertainment Editor

Do you have long hair? Do you own your own love beads? Do you look generally countercultural? If you can answer yes to any of those questions, Ang Lee's upcoming film "Taking Woodstock" needs you.
   
The behind-the-scenes drama about the tumultuous runup to the 1969 rock fest will hold open auditions for extras throughout the Capital Region this weekend. An ad in today's paper says the production partners, Focus Films and Tuxedo Terrace, are seeking "all types (college kids, hippies, townspeople, police, etc)" for various filming dates beginning in mid-August and running through mid-October in Columbia County.

The casting calls take place from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday in Hudson at the Smith Middle School, 215 Harry Howard Ave.; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday in Albany at the College of Saint Rose Event & Athletic Center, 420 Western Ave.; and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday in New Lebanon at the Church of the Immaculate Conception at 732 Route 20.

Applicants should bring a non-returnable photo and must be a legal U.S. resident.

The production is also looking for vintage vehicles from the era; if you have one, bring a non-returnable photo and a description of its make, model and condition.

Ang Lee is the Oscar-winning director of "Brokeback Mountain" and "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." His longtime collaborator James Schamus -- producer, screenwriter and head of Focus Features -- lives in Chatham, and is a regular participant in the FilmColumbia festival.

Billed as a comedy, "Taking Woodstock" is based on a memoir by Elliot Tiber, a small-town official who found himself at the crossroads of the generation-defining event.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2008, 06:22:19 pm by Elle »

Offline Ellemeno

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Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2008, 01:45:59 am »
An excerpt from an article on publishing houses:

"An example of being blessed by fortune was a chance meeting 3,000 miles from the Island that resulted in a windfall for Square One.

The break happened after the company published its first memoir, “Taking Woodstock,” by Elliot Tiber.

Tiber, a friend of Shur’s, kept pestering the publisher about a manuscript he was working on relating his experiences at the Woodstock festival in 1969. “Every once in awhile, something happens and you either see it or you don’t,” Shur said. “After Elliot called me five times I saw it.”

About 3,000 hardcover copies were published last summer and Square One’s luck held thanks to a book tour organized by Anthony Pomes, marketing and publicity director at the house. Waiting to be interviewed at a local San Francisco TV station about his memoir, Tiber found himself sharing a green room with Ang Lee, the Oscar- winning director of “Brokeback Mountain.”

Tiber told the director about his book and Lee expressed interest. Soon the film rights, which Shur had kept, were sold to Focus Features. Lee will begin filming in the fall. Next summer, the 40th anniversary of Woodstock, Square One will publish a trade paperback of the memoir, feeding off the film and the anniversary. Shur said anywhere from 50,000 to 250,000 copies could be sold."

http://www.libn.com/article.htm?articleID=43035
« Last Edit: July 28, 2008, 06:22:35 pm by Elle »

Offline Ellemeno

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Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2008, 11:58:32 am »
Here's a mention in a blog of one person's experience auditioning for the film.  Note she says they are looking for 6,000 people to be extras in the film!  Come on, y'all, isn't there anyone here who wants to return to their hippy look and be in an Ang film? 

http://donnaleedm.blogspot.com/2008/07/cant-believe-i-auditioned-for-ang-lee.html
« Last Edit: July 28, 2008, 06:22:45 pm by Elle »

Offline Ellemeno

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Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2008, 11:12:06 am »
From the Rutland (Vermont) Herald

Party like it's 1969

July 28, 2008
By Brent Curtis Herald Staff

 
BENNINGTON — The Elks Lodge on Washington Street was a hip place to be on Sunday.

Tie-dyed T-shirts, moon beads and hair — long, flowing, untamed-freak-flag manes of hair — filled the otherwise square and well-kempt dining hall at the lodge where the casting call for Academy Award-winning director Ang Lee's new movie, "Taking Woodstock," was held.

Hippies and those willing to play the part stood in line, posed for Polaroid shots and interviewed with casting directors, who asked them questions about their availability during the August shoot in New Lebanon, N.Y., queried them about their musical and acting talents and inquired about their willingness to participate in nude scenes written into the film. A casting call took place in Brattleboro Saturday.

Nude or not, the dozens of people who came to audition were ready to get their groove on.

"It's all about the outfits," 50-year-old Valerie Toenes said, in her colored skirts and a hair wrap that complemented her daughter's peace sign and guitar nicely. "We figured if we got in, great. If not we at least had fun finding the outfits."

Toenes, who hinted at hippie-style leanings in her past and her 14-year-old daughter Jillon McGreal, who said she went through a hippie phase way back in middle school, drove up from Chatham, N.Y., to try their luck.

None of the participants learned on Sunday whether they were in or out, but Toenes and McGreal said the directors seemed interested in the mother's free-flowing hair and tarot card reading and the daughter's guitar playing.

Toenes, who most days inhabits a professional office suite where she works as an architect, said she expected those talents to attract interest.

What they didn't expect was the directors' interest in the family dog.

"They said they might be interested in recruiting our dog," Toenes said of the family's black Labrador-Rottweiler. "That was a surprise."

Toenes and McGreal said they planned to shop for a tie-dyed dog collar or a neckerchief to get their pooch ready for the part.

Mother and daughter were like many people at the audition in one key respect — they weren't real hippies.

Stephanie Hedges of Lenox, Mass., for example, never experimented with the counterculture lifestyle. But as an actress with a resume ranging from locally produced plays to extra roles in movies such as "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" and television shows such as "Walker, Texas Ranger," Hedges said she's up to taking on an unfamiliar role.

Unfortunately, her wardrobe wasn't.

But after digging through her closet, the 39-year-old said she hit upon a transparent paisley blouse — actually two large bandanas sewn together — which had a quasi-hippie appeal to it.

As a payday, the extra role would pay Hedges and the other extras $100 to $130 a day with some meals thrown in.

But Hedges said auditioning for extra roles can be worth the trip because non-speaking roles can transform into speaking roles if directors see talent.

"Ideally, a speaking role is what I'm hoping for," she said.

Nine-year-old Skylar Burditt of Rutland looked like a hippie with his face half-hidden behind long blonde locks of hair.

But Burditt said he doesn't know what a hippie is and he certainly isn't into the music of the '60s — he likes his hair long, according to his dad, so he can head-bang to the English heavy-metal band Iron Maiden.

"I know it was a concert with about 5,000 people," Burditt said when asked what he knew about Woodstock.

What Burditt does know is he wants to be an actor some day and a small role in a movie is just the stepping stone that the Rutland youngster, who has acted in two plays, said he is looking for.

Ironically, longtime hippies Janet Gordon and David Cook have something in common with the 9-year-old — their experience with Woodstock is limited to what they've heard.

Both Gordon, 62, and Cook, 58, were immersed in the counterculture when the iconic music and arts festival rolled onto Max Yasgur's 600-acre farm for three days of love and music.

But Gordon, who was living in a commune, was pregnant at the time and Cook, who was living in Massachusetts, said he couldn't hitch a ride.

Now Gordon, who works as a nurse, and Cook, who live together in Pownal, have a chance to relive history.

And Gordon, who said she was inspired to audition in part because of her successful bout with breast cancer last year, said she has every intention of playing the extra role like it's 1969 again.

"They asked me if I would do a nude shot and I said, 'Oh yeah,'" she said.

Contact Brent Curtis at [email protected]

http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080728/NEWS04/807280358/1003/NEWS02
« Last Edit: July 28, 2008, 06:22:55 pm by Elle »

Offline Ellemeno

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Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2008, 06:01:38 pm »
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

6,000 hippies needed!  Isn't there one BetterMostian who wants to be in Ang's new film?

Offline Lynne

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Re: Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2008, 06:04:49 pm »
 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

(rummaging for my old going-to-Phish-shows clothes!)
"Laß sein. Laß sein."

Offline cmr107

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Re: Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2008, 08:27:07 pm »
Aww, if I lived anywhere near New York I would go. I have long hair. And I've seen Hair:) I could totally look like a hippie!

Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee's new film, needs 6000 hippies!
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2008, 08:38:45 pm »
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

6,000 hippies needed!  Isn't there one BetterMostian who wants to be in Ang's new film?

I think we should turn this into an official Brokie event.  A big group of us could go!  And, it could be a subtle nod to the deleted hippie scene in BBM. 8)  Maybe this film is Ang's way of working through that deleted scene on a really large scale.
 :laugh:

Maybe I'll feature this in the next Round Up as a potential Brokie event.  :laugh:

Seriously though, when I was in high school I went through a fairly long phase when I was totally enamored of 60s counterculture including lots of elements of hippie culture.







the world was asleep to our latent fuss - bowie

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2008, 05:23:51 pm »
06 August 2008

Ang Lee Is Taking Woodstock
Oscar-winner tackling music festival


Source: Variety
   

If you see a whole bunch of naked people being politely shouted at by a Taiwanese man later this year, you may well stumbled across production on Ang Lee's Taking Woodstock.

The Oscar-winning Brokeback Mountain director is set to shoot a film chronicling the birth of the legendary music festival beloved of clothing-averse types who like to paint flowers on any yielding surface. Written by James Schamus, a regular Lee Collaborator, the film will be based on a memoir by Elliott Tiber, a man who helped start the event on his neighbour's farm.

Demetri Martin, nerdish cast member of The Daily Show, is already on board to play Tiber, an aspiring interior designer who has his ambitions curbed when he's called upon to run his family's Catskills motel. Volunteering the motel for use as the Woodstock organisers' base of operation brought him into one of the defining events of the hippie era.

Imelda Staunton and Henry Goodman will play Tiber's parents; Emile Hirsch will take on the role of a vietnam vet; Eugene Levy will play Max Yasgur, the owner of the farm where the concert happened; Liev Schreiber is in talks to play a transvestite called Vilma; Jeffrey Dean Morgan is a closeted married man having an affair with Tiber; Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan will play a hippie couple. Mamie Gummer, Dan Fogler and Jonathan Groff also have roles.

Well, that's all very intriguing, but the only way this could sound less like an Ang Lee project would be if you threw in a big, green, giant man...oh, hang on.

Olly Richards

http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=23038

Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2008, 06:12:15 pm »
 :D

Wow. That will be interesting.
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Offline cmr107

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2008, 02:21:25 am »
If you see a whole bunch of naked people being politely shouted at by a Taiwanese man later this year, you may well stumbled across production on Ang Lee's Taking Woodstock.

 :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2008, 04:11:59 am »
Well, that's all very intriguing, but the only way this could sound less like an Ang Lee project would be if you threw in a big, green, giant man...oh, hang on.







Ang likes green giants ;D ;D ;D


And since he's looking for hippies ....
... fat chance Ang would hire those two flower-power birds if they auditioned  :laugh:


Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2008, 02:12:39 pm »
James Schamus named 9th annual Woodstock Film Festival Trailblazer Award winner



By Germain Lussier
Times Herald-Record
August 06, 2008
A green lit movie and a Trailblazer award. Not a bad day for James Schamus.

Schamus, who wrote Ang Lee’s upcoming locally set “Taking Woodstock” (which was officially announced today) is set to receive the 9th annual Trailblazer Award at the upcoming Woodstock Film Festival in early October.

Currently the CEO of Focus Features, Schamus has been nominated for multiple Academy Awards for his screenwriting and songwriting (“Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”) and producing (“Brokeback Mountain”) in addition to several other accolades.

In a news release, Schamus said “I’m touched to be receiving this honor from one of my very favorite film festivals – one that carries on the spirit of adventure and discovery that characterizes its hometown.”

Meira Blaustein, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the festival said, “The award was created with the intention of honoring those who have taken an innovative and transforming approach in the film industry. Mr. Schamus surpasses those objectives.”

It’ll be presented to him on October 4 . The 9th annual Woodstock Film Festival takes place October 1-5.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2009, 01:41:07 pm »
Saw the following on Facebook's Ang Lee page:

Focus Features' upcoming film Taking Woodstock's Academy-Award winning director Ang Lee and producer/screenwriter James Schamus are coming to The University of California, Berkeley campus on Monday, March 16th at 8:00 PM. Tickets are available at the link below.

http://www.calperfs.berkeley.edu/presents/season/2008/speaking/al_js.php

Taking Woodstock is scheduled to hit theatres this August.
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline belbbmfan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2009, 03:18:20 pm »
Taking Woodstock has entered the official competition at the Cannes Filmfestival.  :)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/8014606.stm
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2009, 02:42:59 am »
Coming to the Cannes Film Festival

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Iq8z2WDbKo[/youtube]

Offline optom3

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2009, 01:26:58 pm »
I really want to see this film.
 It will take me back to my youth, when I used to sneak off to Glastonbury with my brother.Oh happy days, when anything seemed possible and we had the world at our feet.

Or maybe that was just the weed talking !!!

I continued to go until I was 30 plus,in between marriages and dating an Adonis 19 year old who played the guitar like, Jimmy Paige, and looked like Jon Bon Jovi. !!!

His biggest claim to fame, was playing as warm up for the all female rock band, Girls school. !!! My parents were apoplectic when we got engaged.They need not have been.Once the initial novelty wore off, after about a year, we simply did not have anything to talk about and it all fizzled out.

Offline Meryl

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2009, 01:39:26 pm »
Coming to the Cannes Film Festival

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Iq8z2WDbKo[/youtube]

Woo hoo!  This looks great!  8)
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Offline southendmd

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2009, 09:19:09 pm »
OMG, that looks awesome.  Go, Ang!
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #21 on: May 09, 2009, 02:56:26 am »
See what we missed by not being extras in the film?

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLMkneDtygg[/youtube]

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2009, 04:43:35 pm »
It's August and time to get out your feathers, tie-dye, miniskirts, granny glasses, henna, love beads, bong, etc. and get ready for Taking Woodstock!!

Do you think maybe Ang took on this project as a favor to his producer James Schamus, since we know that JS loves all things hippie?
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline belbbmfan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2009, 01:35:28 pm »
Taking Woodstock has no official release date for Belgium.  ???

I don't get it. This is an Ang Lee movie. And no one is going to get to see it over here? It's set to be released in September in the Netherlands. I really hope we get a chance to see it in the theater too.
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Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2009, 09:06:37 pm »
Heya!
I was just watching the early evening re-run (of last night's) Colbert Report, and Comedy Central ran an ad saying that Ang Lee would be the guest on the Colbert Report later tonight!
 :D

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Offline Meryl

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2009, 12:00:34 am »
Thanks, Amanda!  I was able to catch the last half of the interview just now.  I'll watch the repeat tomorrow morning.  It's great to see Ang out promoting the movie.  8)
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #26 on: August 20, 2009, 12:10:47 am »
I just caught up on this thread now, so I'll have to hope to catch tomorrow morning's Colbert repeat.


Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #27 on: August 20, 2009, 09:24:17 am »
I just caught up on this thread now, so I'll have to hope to catch tomorrow morning's Colbert repeat.




Yep, that's what I'm going to do too.  I almost always watch the Daily Show and the Colbert Report in the earlier evening re-run slot.  So, I have a one day lag usually.  I'm looking forward to seeing the Ang Lee interview in re-run form tonight.
:)

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Offline Meryl

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #28 on: August 20, 2009, 10:37:19 am »
I watched the interview this morning; Comedy Central repeats Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert between 9:00 and 10:00 am here.  Ang didn't seem to quite know what to make of Colbert, but he seemed amused and went along with him.  Very cute.

To see it on the official site, go here and click on the third box to the right in the "All New Video" box:

http://www.colbertnation.com/home
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2009, 03:54:26 am »
Here's a direct link to the Ang Lee interview on The Colbert Report.

http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/247154/august-19-2009/ang-lee


Colbert:  You directed Brokeback Mountain, Sense and Sensibility, The Ice Storm, and now Taking Woodstock.  Why don't you ever break the mold and do something new?  It's always the same thing, movie after movie.

(lots of laughter)

Colbert:  Why are you doing Taking Woodstock?  Why now?

Ang:  I did six tragedies in a row.  I just couldn't take it anymore.

Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #30 on: August 23, 2009, 12:00:03 pm »
Here's a direct link to the Ang Lee interview on The Colbert Report.

http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/247154/august-19-2009/ang-lee


Colbert:  You directed Brokeback Mountain, Sense and Sensibility, The Ice Storm, and now Taking Woodstock.  Why don't you ever break the mold and do something new?  It's always the same thing, movie after movie.

(lots of laughter)

Colbert:  Why are you doing Taking Woodstock?  Why now?

Ang:  I did six tragedies in a row.  I just couldn't take it anymore.


Thanks Elle!  Yeah, I thought it was a fun interview.  And the part you highlight here is very interesting... the idea that Lee needs a break from tragedies.  I can see how that makes sense.  I thought Lee was a great sport in the interview.  And, I totally, totally love the Colbert Report.

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Offline belbbmfan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #31 on: August 31, 2009, 04:00:43 am »
Yay! I've just discovered that Taking Woodstock will be released here in November.

Phew, I wonder what took them so long to get a release date settled. I was getting worried.
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Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #32 on: August 31, 2009, 11:00:53 am »
OMG, I saw it this weekend, and I am ready to go see it again. It is wonderful!!!!

Where to start, THE PARENTS! OMG, Imelda Staunton as Sonia Teichberg, give this woman an OSCAR! She is amazing. You see her and it is real, she is the real deal. Henry Goodman as Jake Teichberg is amazing too, but with his character being married to Sonia, he does not get to talk as much. When he goes after the mob with a baseball bat you want to stand up and cheer.

Another thing I liked was that all the actors looked different enough that you could keep up with them. I hate it when movies are full of beautiful people. These people are by an large so average looking it is wonderful. When Eugene Levy apprears as Max Yasgur, you know it is him. And the Earthlight Players, whipping off their frocks and dancing nekkid as the helicopter descends at the motel for the first time, it is like "welcome to fairy land!"

Dmetri Martin as Elliott Teichberg is perfect. He is just a lovely, serious gay nerd you want to give a big hug too. Here he is with the herculean task of saving his parents motel and his town and fate provides his with a answer, an answer that will change everything. The whole thing is well balanced and told like a tale of transcendence and redemption, Vilma the pistol packing transvestite arriving out of nowhere to maintain order, Billy, the Vietnam Vet childhood friend of Elliott's who finally recognizes he is home.

But the best part, aside from Elliott and the construction worker kissing on the dance floor, is when the parents get into the Hash Brownies. The whole theater was laughing their heads off at those two, dancing in the rain the dances from the old country, the gut splitting laughter pouring out of them like it had never before. That was my favorite part.

So many good lines in the movie, the girlfriend of the promoter who wore the hat, saying something like "everybody's perspective, it gets in the way of the love..." The draft cards being burned, the bras being burned. It was like evidence of a great exhale on the part of humanity, a moment when a hundred years of pretence was dropped and everyone just looked at each other, really looked at each other for the first time in their lives.

You got to see this movie. You just got to.
"It was only you in my life, and it will always be only you, Jack, I swear."

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #33 on: August 31, 2009, 11:11:00 am »
OMG, I saw it this weekend, and I am ready to go see it again. It is wonderful!!!!

Where to start, THE PARENTS! OMG, Imelda Staunton as Sonia Teichberg, give this woman an OSCAR! She is amazing. You see her and it is real, she is the real deal. Henry Goodman as Jake Teichberg is amazing too, but with his character being married to Sonia, he does not get to talk as much. When he goes after the mob with a baseball bat you want to stand up and cheer.

Another thing I liked was that all the actors looked different enough that you could keep up with them. I hate it when movies are full of beautiful people. These people are by an large so average looking it is wonderful. When Eugene Levy apprears as Max Yasgur, you know it is him. And the Earthlight Players, whipping off their frocks and dancing nekkid as the helicopter descends at the motel for the first time, it is like "welcome to fairy land!"

Dmetri Martin as Elliott Teichberg is perfect. He is just a lovely, serious gay nerd you want to give a big hug too. Here he is with the herculean task of saving his parents motel and his town and fate provides his with a answer, an answer that will change everything. The whole thing is well balanced and told like a tale of transcendence and redemption, Vilma the pistol packing transvestite arriving out of nowhere to maintain order, Billy, the Vietnam Vet childhood friend of Elliott's who finally recognizes he is home.

But the best part, aside from Elliott and the construction worker kissing on the dance floor, is when the parents get into the Hash Brownies. The whole theater was laughing their heads off at those two, dancing in the rain the dances from the old country, the gut splitting laughter pouring out of them like it had never before. That was my favorite part.

So many good lines in the movie, the girlfriend of the promoter who wore the hat, saying something like "everybody's perspective, it gets in the way of the love..." The draft cards being burned, the bras being burned. It was like evidence of a great exhale on the part of humanity, a moment when a hundred years of pretence was dropped and everyone just looked at each other, really looked at each other for the first time in their lives.

You got to see this movie. You just got to.


I am so grateful to read this, because some things I've read have been less than kind.  I look forward to it with renewed hope.  It DOES have a great cast.


Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #34 on: August 31, 2009, 11:13:53 am »
http://www.examiner.com/x-22152-Entertainment-News-Examiner~y2009m8d29-Emile-Hirsch-inspired-by-Heath-Ledger-in-new-film

Emile Hirsch inspired by Heath Ledger in new film
August 29, 2009

 
Alpha Dogs actor Emile Hirsch claims a conversation with passed actor Heath Ledger about famed director Ang Lee is a "big part" of the reason he has signed on for the anticipated Taking Woodstock, despite not reading the script.

Hirsch, whose film credits include Speedracer and the provocative Milk (in which he co-starred with actor Sean Penn) told Parade.com he had always been a big fan of Lee, but it was a conversation with Ledger that impacted the young star after the success of Brokeback Mountain.

"I'll always remember talking to Heath Ledger just after he finished that movie and he was going on about working with Ang and how incredible he was," says the 24-year-old.

When offered the role, Hirsch states he accepted on the spot.

"As soon as I heard Ang Lee was interested in me, I knew I was going to do the film even before I got the script," Hirsch revealed, saying, "I've been a fan of Ang ever since Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, which I absolutely adored."

Hirsch, a growing favorite, initially gained mainstream recognition after his role in 2004's The Girl Next Door and has been successfully building an impressive resume. He is currently dating fashion student Briana Domont.

While it's Ang Lee who brought Hirsch to the film, set for release on November 6th, some wonder whether or not the film's hippy influence tempted the actor, who described his own childhood living in a 'hippy community' in Topanga, California.

Hirsch said, "They have this festival there called Topanga Days, which is like this cool kind of eclectic hippy mix with a few tourists from the rest of LA, but it's like a mini Woodstock in a sense."

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #35 on: August 31, 2009, 11:25:40 am »
OMG, I saw it this weekend, and I am ready to go see it again. It is wonderful!!!!

Where to start, THE PARENTS! OMG, Imelda Staunton as Sonia Teichberg, give this woman an OSCAR! She is amazing. You see her and it is real, she is the real deal. Henry Goodman as Jake Teichberg is amazing too, but with his character being married to Sonia, he does not get to talk as much. When he goes after the mob with a baseball bat you want to stand up and cheer.

Another thing I liked was that all the actors looked different enough that you could keep up with them. I hate it when movies are full of beautiful people. These people are by an large so average looking it is wonderful. When Eugene Levy apprears as Max Yasgur, you know it is him. And the Earthlight Players, whipping off their frocks and dancing nekkid as the helicopter descends at the motel for the first time, it is like "welcome to fairy land!"

Dmetri Martin as Elliott Teichberg is perfect. He is just a lovely, serious gay nerd you want to give a big hug too. Here he is with the herculean task of saving his parents motel and his town and fate provides his with a answer, an answer that will change everything. The whole thing is well balanced and told like a tale of transcendence and redemption, Vilma the pistol packing transvestite arriving out of nowhere to maintain order, Billy, the Vietnam Vet childhood friend of Elliott's who finally recognizes he is home.

But the best part, aside from Elliott and the construction worker kissing on the dance floor, is when the parents get into the Hash Brownies. The whole theater was laughing their heads off at those two, dancing in the rain the dances from the old country, the gut splitting laughter pouring out of them like it had never before. That was my favorite part.

So many good lines in the movie, the girlfriend of the promoter who wore the hat, saying something like "everybody's perspective, it gets in the way of the love..." The draft cards being burned, the bras being burned. It was like evidence of a great exhale on the part of humanity, a moment when a hundred years of pretence was dropped and everyone just looked at each other, really looked at each other for the first time in their lives.

You got to see this movie. You just got to.


Wow. Thank you Truman, for your wonderful enthusiasm :).
Leslie recommended it, so I wanted to see it anyway. But after reading your post, I'm dying to see it. I ran over to IMDB to check when it will be released in Germany. Lucky me, it will come out this Thursday :D.

Offline Penthesilea

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2009, 11:27:17 am »
Yay! I've just discovered that Taking Woodstock will be released here in November.

Phew, I wonder what took them so long to get a release date settled. I was getting worried.


Come over again the next weekend, and you can see it in a couple a days instead of waiting till November ;D ;).

Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #37 on: August 31, 2009, 11:44:14 am »

I am so grateful to read this, because some things I've read have been less than kind.  I look forward to it with renewed hope.  It DOES have a great cast.



You know I had heard that too, on NPR the day before I went. OMG, those people are so jaded, I am glad I didn't listen to them.

You know Emile Hirsh's Billy did remind me of Heath, I remember thinking that would have been such a good role for him.

But the construction worker dude, I think played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan, man, sizzling.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #38 on: August 31, 2009, 11:45:58 am »
http://www.examiner.com/x-22152-Entertainment-News-Examiner~y2009m8d29-Emile-Hirsch-inspired-by-Heath-Ledger-in-new-film

Emile Hirsch inspired by Heath Ledger in new film
August 29, 2009

Interesting! I like Emile Hirsch -- I thought he was really good in Into the Wild as well as Milk. The article forgot to mention that he and Heath appeared together (and were both good, of course) in Lords of Dogtown.


Offline Meryl

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #39 on: August 31, 2009, 06:06:13 pm »
That's more words than you've said in the last two weeks, Truman!  ;)

I saw it today with John G., smellykellyjay, teresa, Sue (Mainegirl) and her husband Dan.  Such an Ang film!  It's all about the details with him.  We all felt like we'd been at Woodstock afterwards: dirt, rain, crazies, cars, port-a-johns, naked folks, kids tripping on drugs, bra-burners, cops, horses, mud and the tacky, run-down motel sitting in the middle of a dead resort area where it all was centered.  The characters were perfect, too, especially Elliot's parents.  There were a few times when I thought it got too slow, but overall it was fun to just sit back and wonder at the improbability of all those strangers hanging out together in such an incongrous place.  Bravo!  8)
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Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #40 on: August 31, 2009, 06:17:49 pm »
[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KxAAnu-ysk&feature=PlayList&p=9D9F715BFD876A5E&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=11[/youtube]

I just read she was the actor that played the mean headmistress of Hogwarts, Delores Ombridge,  that reminded me of Laura Bush!

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cA6oP9pn-Q0&feature=related[/youtube]
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Offline optom3

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #41 on: August 31, 2009, 08:03:40 pm »
You know I had heard that too, on NPR the day before I went. OMG, those people are so jaded, I am glad I didn't listen to them.

You know Emile Hirsh's Billy did remind me of Heath, I remember thinking that would have been such a good role for him.

But the construction worker dude, I think played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan, man, sizzling.

That is funny you mention Heath. I was watching a documentary about the original woodstock complete with archive film clips.It struck me how good it would have been to see Heath in a film directed by Ang again. I couldn't help but think that it was a project, sufficiently off the wall to arouse  Heath's interest, combining as it does both music and film. I then became quite melancholy, thinking of all the future projects that he would never make.

Offline southendmd

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #42 on: August 31, 2009, 11:16:24 pm »
I saw Taking Woodstock tonight. 

I hate to be the naysayer, but...

While there were some good moments, overall I didn't think it held together very well.  Mostly, because I thought the Elliot character just wasn't interesting enough to carry the film.  Like his mother says, he's a "schnook", and by the end he's still a schnook.  I would like to have seen more of Emile Hirch's character, and Liev Schrieber's Vilma was so underused.  I'm not sure if it's James's script or the source material, but the story was pretty jagged, and, full of clichés.

Call me jaded, but I was pretty disappointed. 

Maybe you have to see it high.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #43 on: August 31, 2009, 11:31:30 pm »
Maybe you have to see it high.

Good plan. Where can I score some acid?


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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #44 on: September 01, 2009, 01:07:21 pm »
Good plan. Where can I score some acid?

Any VW bus, apparently.

I forgot to add:  there was a preview for Brothers that looks very good. 
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Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #45 on: September 01, 2009, 01:11:51 pm »
I saw the preview for Brothers, too, looking forward to it.

Whats wrong with being s schnook?  ;)
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #46 on: September 01, 2009, 01:43:21 pm »
Any VW bus, apparently.

See, that's why I miss the '60s. These days there's such a stigma against moms who trip.


Offline southendmd

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #47 on: September 01, 2009, 02:20:30 pm »
Whats wrong with being a schnook?  ;)

Nothing at all.  Except, they should have called it "Schnookstock".
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Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #48 on: September 01, 2009, 03:38:48 pm »
Schnooks make the world go round.  ;D
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #49 on: September 01, 2009, 10:50:16 pm »
Interesting! I like Emile Hirsch -- I thought he was really good in Into the Wild as well as Milk. The article forgot to mention that he and Heath appeared together (and were both good, of course) in Lords of Dogtown.




Isn't that weird - that they would write that article, but neglect to mention the movie they were in together, where, in fact, Heath played a mentor and apparently behaved as such for the young fellers in the movie.

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #50 on: September 01, 2009, 10:58:22 pm »
[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KxAAnu-ysk&feature=PlayList&p=9D9F715BFD876A5E&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=11[/youtube]



That's a wonderful clip.  Imelda Staunton was in one of my favorite films, Peter's Friends, and did a wonderful job.  I just posted this clip of her and them somewhere 'round her recently.  Hugh Laurie at the piano.  Emma Thompson, my beloved Stephen Fry, Kenneth Branagh ~

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2W6JKXYxIUQ[/youtube]


Offline Brown Eyes

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #51 on: September 02, 2009, 04:37:59 pm »
Imelda Staunton is great.  She played Mrs. Sucksby in the 2005 BBC version of the book Fingersmith by Sarah Waters.  She did a great job... See the thread in Culture Tent about Sarah Waters for further details on Fingersmith.

http://bettermost.net/forum/index.php/topic,16313.0.html


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Offline MaineWriter

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #52 on: September 13, 2009, 08:40:27 am »
I saw Taking Woodstock yesterday and I have to say, I was disappointed. It never came together for me...I felt like there were a lot of loose ends that never got tied up.

I read the book last winter -- it was good, not great, but entertaining. While the book certainly had plenty of anecdotes about Eliot's role in the whole planning of Woodstock, a major theme in the book, which never made it into the movie, was about Eliot's "double life." During the week he'd be in NYC, working as an interior designer. He was also a "sexual plaything" for a fairly rough group of men. On the weekend, he'd go to his parent's motel and help them run the place. The summer of 1969 was transformational for him in many ways -- through the power of Woodstock he finally came out to his parents and discovered what it means to have a healthy (not abusive) sexual relationship. (NB: not long after Woodstock, he met the man who became his lifelong companion and partner -- they were together for about 35 years. I think he died a year or so ago.)

The other piece is that in 1969, Eliot was 35 years old which I think casts a whole different perspective on his life and what he was going through. Demetri Martin as Eliot looked about 22 (although in real life he is 36 which I find surprising) and having your whole world change at 22 is different than having your whole world change at 35, imo.

I enjoyed the movie and I am glad I saw it, but it could have been much, much more, I think, and in that way, I was disappointed.

L
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Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #53 on: September 13, 2009, 10:59:05 am »
I dunno, perhaps I am naive in my outlook, but I thought it was a wonderful adventure Elliott went on thru this summer. I am curious what loose ends there were for you Leslie.
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #54 on: September 13, 2009, 12:09:37 pm »
I dunno, perhaps I am naive in my outlook, but I thought it was a wonderful adventure Elliott went on thru this summer. I am curious what loose ends there were for you Leslie.

You don't have to feel bad because you liked it! Everybody has different tastes -- even professional film critics differ widely in their opinions sometimes. Heck, some didn't even like Brokeback Mountain.



Offline MaineWriter

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #55 on: September 13, 2009, 12:57:05 pm »
I dunno, perhaps I am naive in my outlook, but I thought it was a wonderful adventure Elliott went on thru this summer. I am curious what loose ends there were for you Leslie.

Maybe my problem is that I liked the book better than the movie (which is typical). In this case, the book was good, but not great and in the hands of Lee I was expecting a great movie, which I didn't get (to me). Given that he directed BBM from great source material, you can see why my expectations were high. However, taking that thought a step further....the screenplay for BBM was written by Diana Ossana and Larry McMurtry while the screenplay for TW was written by James Schamus....and Schamus wrote the hippie scene in BBM which ended up on the cutting room floor. So maybe my issue is with JS as a screenwriter, not AL as a director. Hmm...

The biggest loose end for me was the "romance" with the construction worker. I read somewhere he was a closeted married guy but I certainly didn't see him enough to figure that out from the movie. Was he wearing a wedding ring? Maybe, but I didn't have a chance to see it.

Other loose ends: the whole logistics of planning and Eliot's role in that (which he discussed much more in the book). In the movie I felt like he spent a lot of time walking around, not actually doing anything. All the money stuff (much funnier in the book, actually). That was never really clarified. And Vilma and the dad? Somehow that was totally lost on me, too.

L
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Offline serious crayons

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #56 on: September 13, 2009, 01:12:58 pm »
Schamus wrote the hippie scene in BBM

He must like hippie scenes!

Quote
Was he wearing a wedding ring? Maybe, but I didn't have a chance to see it.

That's funny, because we know how good Ang is at subtly showing that.




Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #57 on: September 18, 2009, 10:42:16 pm »
I saw Taking Woodstock tonight. 

I hate to be the naysayer, but...

While there were some good moments, overall I didn't think it held together very well.  Mostly, because I thought the Elliot character just wasn't interesting enough to carry the film.  Like his mother says, he's a "schnook", and by the end he's still a schnook.  I would like to have seen more of Emile Hirch's character, and Liev Schrieber's Vilma was so underused.  I'm not sure if it's James's script or the source material, but the story was pretty jagged, and, full of clichés.

Call me jaded, but I was pretty disappointed. 

Maybe you have to see it high.

The New Yorker had somewhat the same reaction. I'll need to see the movie a couple of times more, but overall, I was disappointed too.
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Offline stonebiscuit

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #58 on: September 22, 2009, 07:51:59 pm »
Whats wrong with being s schnook?  ;)

Saw this film yesterday and being slightly prepared for a letdown after reading some of the reviews, i was pleasantly surprised. A lot of the negative comments seem to centre around the fact the momentus event of the film's title is largely left out of the proceedings. Like BBM, Ang Lee here has gone for a small story and placed it in the context of much larger events, however they are never allowed to swallow or overwhelm it. I enjoy his restraint in this way - it gives the film an obverservational feeling. All in all a fun ride and made me long to grow my hair out and dive screaming down a mud covered hillside. "This is our hill" says the lead character to his Vietnam vet friend. Reminds me of two other friends, from another hill........

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #59 on: September 23, 2009, 10:15:50 pm »
What a touching reaction!
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Shakesthecoffecan

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #60 on: September 25, 2009, 03:46:46 pm »
There are several long scenes in the movie, especially in the opening which sets a tone for that moment. Be it honey bees buzzing or The mother watching TV, there is this one shot where a motorcycle cop give Elliott a ride thru the crowd to the show. They pass in and out of a dozen or so little dramas, steadily on their way. I can't imagine the logistics of shooting such a thing.
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Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #61 on: September 26, 2009, 02:18:31 am »
I just saw the movie for the second time tonite. Yes, that scene of going thru the crowd on a motorcycle was definitely impressive. There were several scenes after the start of the festival, with the iconic music in the background, that were memorable, though languid. What about the scene where Elliott, after spending the evening on a "trip" returns home and eats breakfast pancakes with his parents? It reminded me a little of the Thanksgiving scene in Brokeback with Jack and his in-laws. There were many scenes that had a Brokeback corollary. I am glad that Ang Lee keeps working the same themes, because they are the ones that keep dogging me in my own life. For instance, Elliott's mother wakes up one morning after ODing on hash brownies, clutching her squirreled away money. She can't resist telling Elliott how grandiose the sum is: $97,000. That's exactly the amount my mom deposited after selling her little house.
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline stonebiscuit

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #62 on: September 26, 2009, 03:28:06 am »
I can't imagine the logistics of shooting such a thing.

Yea some of the shooting style kinda makes me think of Altman's 'Gosford Park' where the camera is constantly panning around finding pieces of action sometimes just in the corner of frame. I can't imagine everything in this to have been thoroughly staged, or if it was it has an incredibly natural feel to it. Must have been a mad set, hippies running left right and centre.


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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #63 on: September 26, 2009, 07:51:22 pm »
Yes, one example of that is where everyone is at the motel setting up the offices etc and there's a split screen. On the left side, people are doing logistical stuff, ordering sunflower seeds, etc. and on the right side, Elliott is making friends with one of the construction workers. You can't hear what the two of them are saying unless you strain, but you can see their body language and the way their hands move in the air, more and more close together until they almost touch. It's been exactly like that for me during the times I've met someone who would become significant in my life.
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #64 on: September 27, 2009, 03:17:03 am »
Yea some of the shooting style kinda makes me think of Altman's 'Gosford Park' where the camera is constantly panning around finding pieces of action sometimes just in the corner of frame. I can't imagine everything in this to have been thoroughly staged, or if it was it has an incredibly natural feel to it. Must have been a mad set, hippies running left right and centre.




I love Gosford Park, just watched it again this week.  Altman did it at the beginning of The Player too, while two characters overtly talked about long sequences with no cuts.

Offline stonebiscuit

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - Taking Woodstock
« Reply #65 on: September 28, 2009, 04:28:41 am »
Yes, one example of that is where everyone is at the motel setting up the offices etc and there's a split screen. On the left side, people are doing logistical stuff, ordering sunflower seeds, etc. and on the right side, Elliott is making friends with one of the construction workers. You can't hear what the two of them are saying unless you strain, but you can see their body language and the way their hands move in the air, more and more close together until they almost touch. It's been exactly like that for me during the times I've met someone who would become significant in my life.

That's a nice observation. I'm sure it will be a film that rewards repeat viewing.


I love Gosford Park, just watched it again this week.  Altman did it at the beginning of The Player too, while two characters overtly talked about long sequences with no cuts.

Yes, Gosford Park is definitely a masterstroke. Both Lee and Altman seem to be directors that actors crave to work with.

Offline Meryl

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Re: Ang Ang Ang - his next project
« Reply #66 on: November 30, 2009, 12:07:19 pm »
Here's an inkling of what Ang's latest project will be:

http://www.digitalspy.com/movies/news/a184064/life-of-pi-next-for-ang-lee.html

EXCLUSIVE:  'Life Of Pi' next for Ang Lee


Wednesday, October 28 2009, 6:22am EDT
By Simon Reynolds, Movies Editor

Ang Lee has confirmed that his next movie will be an adaptation of Yann Martel's Man Booker Prize-winning novel Life Of Pi for Fox 2000.

The project, which has previously attracted interest from filmmakers M. Night Shyamalan, Alfonso Cuarón and Jean-Pierre Jeunet, follows a boy who survives the sinking of a freighter and shares a lifeboat with an array of exotic animals.

"I think I'm going to do Life Of Pi," Lee revealed to DS. "A little boy adrift at sea with a tiger. It's a hard one to crack."

Lee noted that the project is still at the scripting stages and he hasn't started thinking about who will play the lead character, Indian boy Piscine 'Pi' Molitor Patel.

"I haven't done casting yet," he said. "I'm delivering the first draft. I think I've cracked the structure of the movie and I'll figure out how to do it later. How exactly I'm going to do it, I don't know!"

Asked when the movie is expected is arrive, the director replied: "This is two years ahead of me."
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #67 on: November 30, 2009, 12:25:35 pm »
Here's an inkling of what Ang's latest project will be:

http://www.digitalspy.com/movies/news/a184064/life-of-pi-next-for-ang-lee.html

EXCLUSIVE:  'Life Of Pi' next for Ang Lee




I've been curious about reading this book since it came out.  Maybe now I will.  Thanks Meryl.

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #68 on: May 24, 2010, 03:37:16 am »


http://www.dgaquarterly.org/BACKISSUES/Spring2010/DGAInterviewAngLee.aspx

Interview in DGA (Directors Guild of America) Quarterly

Crossing Borders

Born in Taiwan, schooled at NYU, and trained in the trenches, Ang Lee broke new cultural ground with universal stories like Brokeback Mountain and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. But the one thing he won’t do is repeat himself.


By Glenn Kenny
Photographed by Mike McGregor

“It’s a good day to do an interview,” says Ang Lee on a quiet morning in midtown Manhattan. The director is in a brief lull as he moves from one office to another before embarking on his latest cinematic adventure. So the space where we meet is relatively empty, and though Lee is low key and serene, it is his formidable presence that fills the room.

There is a paradox at work here. Despite his mild manner, Lee has been something of an artistic daredevil, flying from one genre to another and consistently taking risks. With his still controversial Hulk, he tried to bring genuine human feeling to a comic book superhero; with Lust, Caution, the lineaments of the erotic thriller were applied to something deeper, more profound. His last feature, Taking Woodstock, was a coming-of-age story set against the counterculture upheaval of the ’60s, which doesn’t sound particularly subversive, except when you consider it was as much a coming-out story as it was a coming-of-age story.

Born in Taiwan, Lee has directed an impressively varied array of humanist films, including The Wedding Banquet, Eat Drink Man Woman, The Ice Storm, and Ride with the Devil. He was nominated for a DGA Award for his Jane Austen adaptation, Sense and Sensibility, and won DGA Awards for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Brokeback Mountain, for which he also received the Academy Award for best director.

Listening to Lee describe his working methods, one is struck by the compassion of his vision. He said he was honored to do the DGA Interview, and seemed to regard the occasion as a chance to articulate his artistic principles—not just for members, but for himself. “It’s great,” he says, “to have gotten to a place where I can share advice and experience with my fellows in this way.”

Glenn Kenny: In a sense you are both a Taiwanese filmmaker and an American one. So let’s start by talking about your beginnings and how you got to this place.
Ang Lee: In Taiwan I was brought up very non-artistically. The idea in my family, in the culture itself, was to study something practical, get into a good college, then come to America and study, get a degree. But I flunked the college examination because I was too nervous. I got into the Taiwan University of Art, majoring in theater and cinema. Back then, in the early ’70s, there was not much you could do with cinema in Taiwan. But once I stood on stage, as an actor, I just fell in love. I was very happy at the school but we didn’t have a lot of Western theater. I started watch-ing a lot of movies—Bergman, Renoir, many movies by these masters. At the age of 23, I got into the University of Illinois, majoring in theater. I had two years there. That changed my life; I started to devour Western culture, not so much literature or science or social studies, but theater.








MOMENTS IN TIME: (top to bottom) Lee orchestrates a marriage of convenience
in The Wedding Banquet; directing Kate Winslet in Sense and Sensibility;
Sigourney Weaver in The Ice Storm; young lovers in Eat Drink Man Woman.
(Photo credits (top to bottom): MGM; Columbia/Everett; 20th Century Fox/Everett; MGM)

Q: At what point did you realize you were more interested in directing than acting?
A: It happened when I started studying in the States. I couldn’t speak much English at all, I spoke pidgin English. And because of that I couldn’t really act. So I switched from acting to directing. Nevertheless, I think I absorbed a lot that changed me. I grew up in an agricultural culture, which tries to emphasize peace and balance with society and nature, and so attempts to diffuse as much conflict as it can. But in Western culture, particularly theatrical culture, it’s all about conflict, asserting personal free will and how that can create a conflict within the family, or in the larger society. And I found I was talented at communicating those kinds of situations. Eventually, after all my exposure to film, seeing five to seven movies every weekend, I wanted to do films. I did my graduate work at NYU, three years in the film program. It’s a very pragmatic program; you just go out and make movies.

Q: So how did you make the transition from student to professional?
A: Well, after film school, I went through six years of development hell. At NYU we did short films, and I got an agent at William Morris based on those. The thing was, after getting out, it took me three years to really understand the difference between a short and a feature. Nobody really taught us how to deal with a feature-length structure, how that functions, how to develop characters. So now I was lost again. I did quite a bit of pitching in Hollywood, and one project after another just kept falling apart. But through those years I was able to teach myself a few things. Among them, how a feature-length script functions, and what the market wants.

Q: How did you finally break through?
A: In 1990 I entered a Taiwanese govern-ment script competition. It was good money, $16,000 for first prize, and half that amount for second place. And I won both first and second place! The first was for Pushing Hands. I just wrote it specifically for the competition. And The Wedding Banquet, which I had written five years before, won the second prize, and that became my second film. When I wrote Wedding Banquet, it was too Chinese to make in the U.S. and too gay to make in Taiwan. So it had just been sitting there. So I sent the two scripts in and both won. And then a Taiwanese studio wanted to invest in Pushing Hands. It was a small story of a Taiwanese family set in New York. They gave me about $400,000 to make the movie in New York. I was referred to Good Machine, the production company started by Ted Hope and James Schamus. I pitched the story to them, and James said to me, ‘No wonder you couldn’t get anything made for six years. You’re the worst pitcher—you can’t pitch out of a basket.’ They pitched themselves to me as the kings of no-budget filmmaking. Not low budget, no budget. So we hooked up, did the first movie and it was a hit in Taiwan. It didn’t go anywhere else, really. And because that was a hit, the Taiwan studio gave me more money, three-quarters of a million, to make The Wedding Banquet. James said, ‘Let me help you revise the script.’ He did, and the rest, I would like to say, is history.

Q: That started your partnership with Schamus, who has co-written and co-produced almost all of the 10 films you’ve made since 1993, and, as head of Focus Features, distributed several of them as well. How has that relationship helped make it possible for you to keep up a steady output of films?
A: It has been a very organic partnership, something that came out of a friendship, not any kind of master plan. The Wedding Banquet was seen by the future producers of Sense and Sensibility, and because of that film, somehow they thought I’d be a good candidate to adapt Jane Austen. I turned to James and asked, ‘What am I going to do?’ During that time we were thinking about doing English-language films with each other. But these producers approached with Sense, and I couldn’t decide whether to do it or not; for one thing the budget was $16 million. I had never handled that kind of money. And also, I had never done a period piece. But I just couldn’t refuse the temptation to work with Emma Thompson. I read the script [written by Thompson] and despite my English being less fluent at the time, I felt I knew it by heart, that by its nature it was very close to what I do. So I took the challenge, and I went to England. I was very scared. I spoke broken English, and there was Jane Austen. I had to work with a top-of-the-line English cast and crew, with Oxforders, Royal Shakespeareans—just a top-notch cast and crew. Of course I was going to feel intimidated. So I brought James along with me. And during this time and through the shoot, James became kind of my frontman, doing the social interaction with all these people while I was doing my thing.

Q: After Sense and Sensibility, you jumped to The Ice Storm, about the mores of a totally different society: America in the early ’70s. How did that project come about?
A: I read the book because James had recommended it; I wasn’t necessarily looking to make a movie of it. But when I read the part where the character Mikey Carver is sliding down the ice, that image just clicked in my head. I told James, ‘I think I want to make this into a movie.’ He thought it was a valid idea, and then we met [the author of the book] Rick Moody. We bought the rights for nearly nothing. Sense and Sensibility interrupted that process, but when we picked it up again, that was the first time James wrote a screenplay for me on his own.

Q: After establishing yourself in this country with The Ice Storm, you then went back to China for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. What was that like?
A: I was directing both in English and Chinese and bouncing in between the two; it became a balancing act for me. In American films, because it was an adopted culture, the skill and artistic endeavor became clearer. And actually in some ways, psychologically it’s easier. I see the subtext better. As a foreigner, accuracy is the first thing you’ll see, but getting the cultural habits is more difficult. Then once I had directed in English and went back and started Crouching Tiger, I found my thinking had been Westernized, globalized a lot. So I had to find my way back into the Chinese culture, which was my first culture.


STARTING OVER: Lee works with Chow Yun-Fat on Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. He returned
to China to make the film, but didn’t want to just do a Hong Kong-style martial arts movie.
(Photo Credit: Sony Pictures Classics/Everett)

Q: In your career, you’ve gone from a Civil War tale, a superhero adaptation, a modern-day Western. What do you think makes you jump from genre to genre?
A: I have this fear that if I stay in one place, I will lose the freshness I like to bring to every film. If I stay in one genre, I’m afraid I’ll be less honest, because having a certain kind of fluency in a particular genre might allow me to, I don’t know, to fake it. I feel that in order to do my best work I have to put myself in a place where I don’t know much about what I’m doing. A place where I could feel as if I were making my first movie. If I feel like I’m repeating something, or repeating myself, I actually feel more frightened than I would in taking the risk of doing something new.

Q: Is that why you change cinemato-graphers periodically?
A: I think it’s potentially interesting to have a relationship with somebody over a few movies in a row that keeps developing, goes deeper and deeper and becomes more and more artistically fruitful. With cinematographers, there are a few principles I think I stick to. And when I get hooked up with them, it’s for a specific reason. I approached Frederick Elmes for The Ice Storm because the last part of that story, the most important part of it, is the stormy night when the power goes out, the lights go off. The cinematographer was going to have to create this illusion of letting us see people function in the dark. That’s the core of the drama. I so admired what Fred did with David Lynch, particularly in Blue Velvet. Fred just pushed it to the maximum of how low the exposure could get, and he does these wonderful, experimental things.

Q: What about your visual approach for Brokeback Mountain?
A: I went for Rodrigo Prieto [Amores Perros, Babel] on Brokeback Mountain because I think he’s versatile, and I wanted somebody who could shoot quickly. But then I asked him to do the opposite of the frenetic style that he is famous for and he was able to give me the tranquil, almost passive look I wanted for Brokeback. I believe a talent’s a talent.

Q: How do you collaborate with your cinematographer?
A: I like to work with a cinematographer who has two distinct attitudes, regardless of age or experience. First, I want them to talk to me about the drama, not the visuals. I’m not worried about how to shoot it. That will come along if we focus on how to help the actors portray the characters, and move in a way in which they can perform comfortably. I want the cinematographer to have an interest in the content, in telling the story. That’s number one for me. And number two: I don’t want anyone who’s going to behave as if he or she is a master, someone who knows everything about what they do. I want to work with someone who feels they’re still learning, who doesn’t automatically have all the answers. When I meet with someone and ask them what they think about something, and they’re not sure, that’s usually a good sign for me.

Q: A couple of your films have strong visual effects elements—Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, with the wirework that gives its characters the appearance of flying, and Hulk with CGI animating a comic book character. How do you retain the humanity of your characters when working with these effects?
A: Well you know, wirework is actually a relatively low-tech special effect, and there’s no way of getting away from the human element of it. For Crouching Tiger’s battle in the bamboo forest, we had scores of people on the ground physically manipulating the various elements. The human aspect as far as the characters were concerned had to do with the way they fly, which was not specified in the writing but conceived and carried out in the shooting. For instance, Zhang Ziyi’s character seems to be able to fly at will, while the older character played by Michelle Yeoh is a very fast runner, and the momentum she gains by running enables her to bounce up. These particular techniques were very expressive of what the characters were about.

Q: How was that different on Hulk?
A: On Hulk I looked at it as if I were a painter and was using a new and very expensive tool. It was problematic commercially, because what we made was more of a horror movie than a comic book movie, and we had to sell it like Spider-Man. For me, the theme was tied in with that of Crouching Tiger. In that film, the ‘hidden dragon’ is what’s inherent but also repressed in the culture—so in the East it was sex; in Hulk’s America the ‘hidden dragon’ is anger and violence. But we found that instead of describing what I wanted to the animators, if I put on the motion-capture suit or let them shoot my face acting out a certain expression, it could save them weeks of work. So I wound up performing the actions of the Hulk, acting out his anger. And it was a very profound experience for me. I like to work with CGI in a way that the audience won’t see. We actually used some CGI on Brokeback Mountain, with some of the landscapes. If you want a cloud to be in a particular place in the image, you can just put it there. It’s wonderful.




TAKING CHANCES: Lee shares his most private thoughts with his actors. (top) With Tang Wei
in the erotic melodrama Lust, Caution and (bottom) Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal
as lovers in Brokeback Mountain. (Photo Credits:(top) Kinberley French/Focus Features,
(bottom) Chan Kam Cheun/Focus Features)

Q: Do you regret not having access to today’s special effects tools when you made The Ice Storm, which required certain specific images?
A: No, we were able to get what we needed. This is the important thing: people watch a movie, and a movie’s average length is something like an hour and forty minutes, two hours. And I believe that people really focus on the film as an image for maybe about ten, fifteen minutes. The drama is what is really important in the kinds of films I make. It’s got to be about human beings. Nothing holds your attention longer than human faces, something the audience can identify with. Storytelling, drama and human faces—all those comprise the center of what I want to do. I spent movie after movie trying to break away from it, to be more visual, because I like differences. But you can only do so much. It all has to relate to the characters.

Q: One of the most dramatic moments in all your work is the scene when Ennis Del Mar visits Jack Twist’s parents at the end of Brokeback Mountain. How did you go about setting the mood?
A: Well, it goes much farther back from the point when you step on the set. And that scene is, as it happens, my favorite scene in the movie. It’s a very stoic scene, a scene about a person who’s not there but had been brought to life so vividly by Jake Gyllenhaal, who all of these characters have lost. For my visual inspiration I referred to Andrew Wyeth, and also the Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershoi, for those stark, white doors. So the first thing to do was find the right house, the right space, and of course that’s the task I brought to the production designer, Judy Becker. And to shoot that scene I used a style that I had worked with in Hulk. I shot with two cameras, capturing the actors from both sides, and then changing lenses and doing it again. It’s a very irregular way of coverage. When you edit it together, you can apply certain emphasis to certain reactions, emotions. Shooting this kind of coverage can confuse some actors. But of course it did not confuse Heath [Ledger], Peter [McRobbie], and Roberta [Maxwell], all of whom I just loved. It was a strange day. I wanted a lot of sunshine for that scene, and I got it, and I remember walking to the set and just feeling that this was going to be a great day. Still, a scene like that, it’s the actors and their faces, they make it all.

Q: In casting, you frequently mix ex-perienced actors with novices. How do you guide actors to give you the emotion you need for each film?
A: I probably can talk about this for days, because every actor is different. And each one is like a mountain you have to climb over. Nothing, of course, is easy. I think when one devotes so much energy in making a movie, at the very least the leading roles are a significant part of you as the director. So you apply yourself to the actors. And they know that. You’re watching them, they’re watching you. And I’m wondering, how can I turn them into something I had in mind? And they’re watching me, trying to figure out a part of my mind, so they can play that. It’s all very abstract and it goes back and forth a lot. I’ve said about my relations with cinematographers, production designers, writers, and producers, that I give them all parts of myself. But I have no doubt I give my best part to actors. It doesn’t mean that I’m a friend of theirs. I hardly, if ever, socialize with them. Some of them have found me cold, in fact. But I do what I think I have to in order to get artistic moments laid out and fixed on celluloid for good. There’s definitely a battle to it. Making a movie is pretty holy to me, and I think the actors sense that.

Q: Is it ever a problem getting a newcomer and a veteran on the same page?
A: It can be difficult getting everything on the same page. When I did Sense and Sensibility, Kate Winslet was only 19, it was her second movie. It could be difficult to get her to do certain things, to deal with the camera and not to react to it self-consciously. Now, of course, she is aware of all that, but not so much back then. And that’s the easiest thing for Emma Thompson, on top of which, Emma can deliver something like four or five layers of meaning at once, effortlessly. While Kate, even at that relatively raw stage, had the power to move people, to make the audience worry for her. That seemed like an easy thing for Kate, and a harder thing for Emma. And they were playing sisters.




WAR AND PEACE: (top) Lee sets up a psychedelic scene with Demetri Martin and
Paul Dano in Taking Woodstock; (bottom) Lee tried to bring real human emotions
to Hulk, and shot on location in San Francisco.
(Photo Credits: (top) Ken Regan/Focus Features,
(bottom) Courtesy of Universal Pictures)

Q: What’s the process like when you’re just beginning to work with the actors?
A: First off, you have to get a sense of their breathing, their vibes. Rehearsing helps you get into the zone. But the most important thing is the shooting day. Usually I do two, three weeks of rehearsal. The rehearsal is not about running through the film like it’s the real thing. I think movie actors tend not to give you a lot during rehearsals, and for good reason. Because if they give it all out, you lose it for the shooting days. If they hold it, then those qualities you’re really looking for are—we hope—preserved for the shooting. So I think rehearsals are about helping us all to see the actors, and for myself, to see and hear the character begin to take shape in them, to have a taste of the character and that character’s chemistry with the others. On set, we all have to work with the camera and we work for the moments. You have to think and feel. And so what comes out of the rehearsal is not the performance, but a way of thinking together.

Q: With all of this activity going on around you, how do you see your role as director?
A: I think film is an artificial medium. It’s not life. It’s not real. But it certainly has a god of its own. There’s a film god you have to worship. There’s a certain point you just have to give up everybody’s ideas and listen to that voice. I initiate a lot of things, but then I kind of become the observer and decide which way to go that will match the film god’s intent. I think each film has its own way. I tell my cast and crew it’s not about us, it’s not about me. We’re all slaves to that big master of the movies. So that’s my goal. I try to tune everybody in to that and bring unity.

Q: What’s the first thing you do when you come on the set?
A: When I’m shooting, I block in the morning, and then the actors go back to do their makeup. I give out the shot list. I work out the upcoming scene with the assistant director, the camera person, and the art department. And when we have the shot ready, we work on the details, refine them. And try to hit, hit, hit until you hit that one take, take after take.

Q: How many takes?
A: I would say six or seven. It’s hard to go over twelve takes. Probably no less than three takes. On Lust, Caution, after five takes Tang Wei, who was making her first film, would lose concentration. She was very emotional, very moody. She would zoom into the mood of the set right away, but then she might drift. With other similarly less experienced actors it’s different. Lee-Hom Wang [in Lust, Caution] or Demetri Martin [in Taking Woodstock], both novice film actors, would consistently get better take after take. You could count on the seventh take being better than the sixth. But by the same token, you also really haven’t gotten anywhere until the fifth take. And then you have a dream actor like a Tony Leung [Lust, Caution] or a Joan Allen [The Ice Storm], and take after take they’re just perfect. So you have all of that. There’s a lot of mixing, matching, and balancing to do.

Q: In Lust, Caution you combined emotional intensity with very explicit sex scenes. Was it difficult to get the right balance?
A: Yes. The two characters are trying to kill each other. He’s an interrogator and she is the seducer, and I don’t find anything more intense than that. With actors I get into subject matter I don’t even get into with my wife, with my family, because I share the most private place with the actors and am very direct with them. We make our art out of those materials and we make a connection at that level. And with those characters I was exposing myself. So that was a very painful experience for me actually. With the sex scenes, I think we were breaking the boundaries of certain kinds of acting. To oversee that, to create a situation where you have to wonder whether what’s going on in front of you is real, that’s the ultimate experience that a director can have with actors. But it was terrible, too. After the shoot we all got sick for a month. It was that intense. And after the movie, for the first time, I felt it was my job to bring the actors back from it. I’m still dealing with Tang Wei. I’m still helping her to come off from that character. In the past I didn’t see that as my job.

Q: What kind of relationship do you us-ually have with your actors?
A: I don’t know how actors feel about me. I used to be able to get away with certain things when I first directed English-language movies. Because I couldn’t speak English very well, I’d give very direct and blunt directions. The actors would be shocked by this, but they figured it was because my English was bad and I didn’t know any better, so they tolerated it. But the better my English became, the less I could get away with it. I had to become more civilized like everybody else. With Taking Woodstock I began to loosen up a bit, partially because the process of making Lust, Caution was so intense. Aside from the sunnier subject matter, I personally decided to be a little nicer, a little more complimentary, and be more concerned with making sure everybody was happy.

Q: Some of your pictures seem to be de-signed for an international audience. Have they been well received overseas, especially in the Asian market?
A: Our experiences with Asian markets have been interesting. When we made Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, it was because for a long time I had wanted to make a martial arts film, but at the same time I thought I had to upgrade it. I didn’t want to just make a Hong Kong-style B-genre movie of the type I saw when I was growing up. We wound up giving it a mixture of A and B ingredients. That didn’t really go over very well in the Eastern markets, although we had great success in the West. The fresh approach was more appreciated here. The opposite happened with Lust, Caution. It was a huge cultural phenomenon in the East, but it didn’t do anything in the West. Maybe because it related so directly to history there, and maybe because its sense of tragedy is more commonly accepted in the East than it is here.

Q: What’s the audience like in China?
A: Mainland Chinese cinema is really beginning to take off. It’s a new market and it’s an interesting market, and that industry is beginning to make its own middle-of-the-road movies. Piracy is everywhere but the audience there still goes to the movie theater. Looking at what becomes a hit there, even for me it’s very hard to understand why they like certain things, why they don’t like certain things. But they’re four times the size of the American audience, so even just playing one city, a film can make a hundred million, and it’s a hit. That’s a significant market.

Q: Given the complexities of the mar-ketplace, do you think there will continue to be room for the kind of films you make?
A: I’m in a pretty safe zone. When I’m making what you might call a big-small movie, I don’t particularly have much of a problem then. And I get to make the movie I want to make. In terms of international movies, I think there are a lot of interesting movies that happen outside of America. And the American art house film seems to be defined as a low-budget enterprise. So you have that, and then there’s the Hollywood movie. But I do think we need a lot more of what you might call the ‘tweeners.’ Movies are being polarized. You have some successful directors of artistic integrity who get to do more expensive movies, but not a lot of them.

Q: Your next film, The Life of Pi, based on the book by Yann Martel, is an adventure story about a boy stranded on a lifeboat in the Pacific with a zebra, a hyena, an orangutan and a tiger. That sounds like a tricky film that will require lots of preparation.
A: I was very intrigued by the book when I read it in 2001 but didn’t think it could be made into a movie. Then when I was starting Woodstock, Fox 2000 approached me and said the project had become available again. This movie I think will be different because technically it’s difficult. It deals with animation, so previsualization will come into play. I hate previsualization; usually I don’t do storyboards. Sometimes I do, but I don’t follow them. Why would you cover the shot [as it was storyboarded] instead of finding something and trying to make that work for you? It doesn’t make much sense to me. But then directing doesn’t stand still. When you do shots that are expensive, you have to plan them out. You cannot afford the usual process. It’s exciting. It’s moviemaking. There are no rules.

Offline Sophia

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #69 on: February 22, 2011, 03:28:14 pm »
 For a while I have been really really really into ANG ANG ANG movies. For the moment I have been watching some of his earlier work. I really love the Asian inspired movies. And I love to try to find some relation to Brokeback mountain.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #70 on: April 10, 2011, 10:54:26 pm »
Me, too! I've been reading about the making of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and here's an interesting passage I found:

[At Cannes] "they misted up at the friendship of Mu Bai and Shu Lien, two brave warriors who haven't quite the courage to say I love you. They happily took the film's 20-minute detour to the Gobi, where in a flashback Jen meets her bandit beau Lo and makes love with the spontaneity of a first-time tryst and the calculat ion of a girl who has to be on top (...Jen wants to love a fighter and fight her lover.)"

"Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is a story about passions, emotions, desires--the dragons hidden inside all of us." -Ang Lee

"The martial arts form 'externalizes the elements of restraint and exhiliaration,' [Lee] continued. . .'In a family drama there is a verbal fight. Here you kick butt'."

May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Meryl

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #71 on: March 07, 2013, 04:08:59 pm »
Reviving this good old thread with a nice article about Ang Lee's patient path to success:

http://jeffjlin.com/2013/02/23/ang-lee-and-the-uncertainty-of-success/

Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Mandy21

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #72 on: May 09, 2013, 09:52:57 am »
http://news.yahoo.com/director-ang-lee-touts-diligence-key-success-100407356.html

Director Ang Lee touts diligence as key to success
Associated PressAssociated Press – 2 hrs 31 mins ago..


 
TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Academy award-winning director Ang Lee says modesty and diligence have been the keys to his success in penetrating the foreign cultures that were part of many of his most notable films.

Earlier this year, the Taiwanese filmmaker won his second best director Oscar for "Life of Pi," a fantasy adventure about a 16-year-old Indian boy on an epic journey of survival. He also won the best director award for "Brokeback Mountain" in 2005.

Speaking to reporters in Taipei on Thursday, Lee said "I have to read everything and watch everything" before directing films with distinctly non-Taiwanese or non-Chinese themes, like "Sense and Sensibility," which takes place in early 19th century England, or "Brokeback Mountain," a gay love story set in late 20th century Wyoming.

"I grew up here until I was 23," he said, referring to his native Taiwan. "Taiwan is a very open society. It's an island, so we have a lot of influences."

Still, he said, successfully penetrating the foreign backdrops that feature in many of his best films is often difficult going.

"I have to be modest and diligent in adopting all kinds of cultures," he said.

Lee's next project — a television series for FX entitled "Tyrant" — focuses on an American family caught up in the turbulence of the contemporary Middle East.

He said that while the project represented a significant departure for him, he was still looking forward to doing it.

"'Tyrant' is the first TV pilot I ever read," he said. "I don't really watch TV."
Dawn is coming,
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Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #73 on: May 09, 2013, 10:30:07 am »
Great find, Mandy, thanks for sharing!
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Monika

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #74 on: May 09, 2013, 03:38:58 pm »
. "I don't really watch TV."

Somehow I believe this. I can´t even imagine Ang in front of a television set  :D

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #75 on: May 13, 2013, 08:14:53 pm »
and it's funny considering he's working on TV now.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Mandy21

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #76 on: May 21, 2013, 08:42:19 am »
and it's funny considering he's working on TV now.

Mmm, not so much:

..

Ang Lee drops out of FX's 'Tyrant' pilot
ReutersBy Tim Kenneally | Reuters – 11 hrs ago..


Reuters/Reuters - Director Ang Lee speaks in a news conference in Taipei, May 9, 2013. REUTERS/Yi-ting Chung


 
By Tim Kenneally

LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) - Ang Lee apparently isn't feeling very tyrannical anymore.

The "Life of Pi" director has dropped out of the FX pilot "Tyrant," which would have marked his television directorial debut.

The pilot, from "Homeland" producers Howard Gordon and Gideon Raff, along with Craig Wright ("Six Feet Under"), follows an unassuming American family drawn into the workings of a turbulent Middle Eastern nation. Raff created the pilot, which was developed by Gordon and Wright.

Raff handled writing duties for the pilot, which comes from Teakwood Lane, Gordon's production shingle with 20th Century Fox Television.
Dawn is coming,
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Offline southendmd

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #77 on: August 28, 2013, 12:49:14 pm »
Ang is coming to Wellesley College in October!  My hometown!

http://theswellesleyreport.com/2013/08/wellesley-acadamy-award-winning-director-ang-lee-headed-to-wellesley/

"Ang Lee, a three-time Academy Award-winning director, will be visiting Wellesley College on Oct. 26 for a conversation that’s open to the public (usually the way these things work is a professors asks a bunch of academic-ese questions, then students and the public chime in). The event takes place at 10am-noon at Alumnae Hall.

"Lee is best known for directing films such as Brokeback Mountain, Life of Pi and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (though “The Ice Storm” is my favorite of his).

"The Newhouse Center for the Humanities, the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, and the Cinema and Media Studies Program at Wellesley College are co-organizing a series of events leading up to Lee’s visit on campus, including special screenings of his major films and academic talks on related topics."

photobucket sucks

Offline southendmd

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #78 on: August 28, 2013, 01:02:38 pm »
The Newhouse Center at Wellesley College notes that James Schamus will also be there. 

http://www.newhouse-center.org/lectures.php
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Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #79 on: August 28, 2013, 03:22:41 pm »
Ooooh, Paul, are you going?   I wanna go!  I still need to get Ang's signature on my Oscar consideration book.


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline southendmd

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #80 on: August 28, 2013, 04:04:40 pm »
Ooooh, Paul, are you going?   I wanna go!  I still need to get Ang's signature on my Oscar consideration book.

Yes, I think some of us Boston Brokies will organize a little thANGsgiving get together.  C'mon up!
photobucket sucks

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #81 on: August 28, 2013, 07:17:36 pm »
Oh boy!!!!  ;D


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #82 on: June 08, 2015, 09:21:25 pm »
Taking Woodstock is bittersweet for me. I saw it twice...the first time with EDelMar. I suggested to Rodney that we go together to view it but he said he wasn't interested. The next time I saw Rodney was at the theater. EDelMar had invited him to see Taking Woodstock and, of course, he wanted to go! I said goodbye to Rodney in the parking lot after the movie, and that's the last time I ever saw him.
May 2019 be better for us all.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #83 on: November 01, 2016, 12:14:36 pm »
Last night the Britannia Awards were held in Los Angeles, and Ang Lee said that Brokeback “brought me back to life” and was “the one time I had a strong sense there is a movie god and he loves me.”  :-*

Link
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Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #84 on: November 01, 2016, 01:41:11 pm »
congrats to Ang on his award!


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Ang Ang Ang
« Reply #85 on: November 28, 2016, 11:24:00 pm »
Ang said, "There's a private feeling to the movie, an intimate feeling. I think eventually everybody has a Brokeback Mountain (2005) in them. Someone you want to come back to. And, of course, some people don't come back."
May 2019 be better for us all.