Author Topic: In the New Yorker...  (Read 975038 times)

Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1360 on: February 28, 2016, 07:02:59 pm »
Yes, that's the one. So, Mr. Money Mustache lives in Longmont, which is a little farther north than where LauraGigs and Offline Chuck live, and south of where Monica and Dave used to live. Scanning the article I can see that I'm a bit of a Mustachian myself even though I've never heard of this guy. I have been known even to scrub my floor with a sponge and sweep it with a whiskbroom and dustpan!

Sometimes the best way to get a floor clean is to get down on your hands and knees and scrub it. I don't see anything particularly Mustachian about that--except that he wouldn't buy his wife a mop. She must love him very much. He comes across to me as a fanatic, and people who are fanatics about anything can be difficult to live with.

Since I live in the very heart of a city that was surveyed and laid out 200 years before the automobile was invented, I expect he would approve of the fact that i don't have an automobile. On the other hand, I shudder to think what he would say about some other things about my lifestyle. (Even though I've had a lot of fun collecting model trains over the past 15 years, I'm presently worrying over the amount of money I've spend on them, money that could have been saved for retirement.)

Perhaps somewhere more appropriate than The New Yorker thread, somebody could explain to me how you get paid for blogging? I get that it's related to how many unique hits your blog gets in a given period--I guess usually a month--but who pays you?  ???
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1361 on: February 28, 2016, 07:32:37 pm »
Your advertisers pay you. There are ads on the side and sometimes on the banner or in between paragraphs. We have them on BetterMost too. The advertisers pay a certain amount depending on how many subscribers or viewers you have.
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1362 on: February 28, 2016, 08:32:41 pm »
Your advertisers pay you. There are ads on the side and sometimes on the banner or in between paragraphs. We have them on BetterMost too. The advertisers pay a certain amount depending on how many subscribers or viewers you have.

Yes, of course. I left that out of my last post. But it still seems like there is a missing step in there somewhere.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1363 on: February 29, 2016, 10:48:51 am »
From the article I was under the impression that Mr. MM didn't want to buy a mop because he thought it was a waste of space. I hardly ever drag out my mop, bucket and big jug of ammonia myself and I almost agree with him. Over the years I've collected a lot of cast off cleaning equipment and supplies. It seems that people start thinking about cleaning up and the first step is to buy a lot of supplies. I also have at least three vacuum cleaners. People buy replacement vacuums when theirs just need a small repair or they can't find the right size bags for them. I've gotten handy over the years and can make do with other people's castoffs.
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Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1364 on: February 29, 2016, 11:54:01 am »
From the article I was under the impression that Mr. MM didn't want to buy a mop because he thought it was a waste of space.

That is what it said, but unless you're talking one of those big, industrial-size mops, with a bucket equipped with a wringer, how much space does a mop occupy?

And still sometimes the best way to get a floor clean is to get down on your hands and knees and scrub it. I'm a horrible housekeeper and even I know that.

People buy replacement vacuums when theirs just need a small repair or they can't find the right size bags for them.

I've never had trouble finding bags, but finding someone who can repair a vacuum cleaner can be another story. Same goes for men's electric shavers, btw. And sometimes when you do find someone who can do repairs, it costs almost as much as a new item. Around here, you can almost--not quite, but almost--buy a new pair of shoes for the price of having new heels and half-soles applied to a pair of shoes you already own.  :(
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1365 on: February 29, 2016, 01:01:47 pm »
Sometimes the best way to get a floor clean is to get down on your hands and knees and scrub it. I don't see anything particularly Mustachian about that--except that he wouldn't buy his wife a mop. She must love him very much. He comes across to me as a fanatic, and people who are fanatics about anything can be difficult to live with.

Oh, somehow I missed the part about them not owning a mop. That's why Lee's post was so confusing.

According to a quick google, you can buy a mop for as little as $23 at Target. It lasts indefinitely. And since it's quicker than scrubbing your floor with a sponge, it frees you up to make far more money than you save by not buying one.

I own a mop, but I hardly ever use it. Nor do I scrub the floor with a sponge. I just let it stay dirty.

I agree that MMM comes across as a fanatic. I got the impression that the author wasn't all that fond of him.

Meanwhile, he spends money on marijuana and beer -- two items that, however enjoyable, are non-necessities.

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Since I live in the very heart of a city that was surveyed and laid out 200 years before the automobile was invented, I expect he would approve of the fact that i don't have an automobile.

I wish I could do that. Between insurance, gas, maintenance, repairs, parking and the car itself (as well as storage, if you live in a downtown area, though I don't), cars are very expensive.

I live in the city, but it's a residential area and not quite walkable. There are stores and coffee shops and a library, but all 7 to 9 blocks away -- technically walking distance, but not a walk you'd typically make if the weather's bad or you're buying a week's worth of groceries for three people.

I'm going to make sure that the next place I live is more walkable and close to public transportation. I'll probably still keep my car, because I have friends who live outside the city, but I won't need to use it as much.

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Perhaps somewhere more appropriate than The New Yorker thread, somebody could explain to me how you get paid for blogging? I get that it's related to how many unique hits your blog gets in a given period--I guess usually a month--but who pays you?  ???

Yes, of course. I left that out of my last post. But it still seems like there is a missing step in there somewhere.

I think companies also pay you to promote their products. As I recall, there's a passage in there saying MMM does this. He got in a tiff with Chase Bank because they wanted him to stop swearing and he told them to bug off. Which seems an odd choice of term, considering the complaint.

I've never had trouble finding bags, but finding someone who can repair a vacuum cleaner can be another story.

There's a vacuum-cleaner repair shop about five minutes from my house. A five-minute drive, that is. If I had to take it in without a car, it would be quite an ordeal.

Still, you might try googling. There are a handful of vacuum-repair shops in my area, so I assume you have some, too. Though they might not be close enough to carry your vacuum to.



Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1366 on: February 29, 2016, 01:03:10 pm »
I just wanted to let you NYer fans know that last week's cover was a big hit with black folks. It was being shared all over Facebook, and people that have never read the mag were asking where to find it in the Philly area.

Congrats!!



Thanks for the news, Milo!  :)



Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1367 on: February 29, 2016, 01:37:26 pm »
I agree that MMM comes across as a fanatic. I got the impression that the author wasn't all that fond of him.

Agreed. I don't think I'd like him, either, not if he presumed to scold me about my lifestyle. Even if you disagree with the way someone leads his life, I think it's rude to scold him about it. But MMM is Canadian, and maybe what I'm taking as scolding is just a certain directness that Canadians have?  ??? (I'm not trying to be a smart-aleck about that; I'm seriously wondering.)

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Meanwhile, he spends money on marijuana and beer -- two items that, however enjoyable, are non-necessities.

But he wouldn't buy his son those cards. Hmm. I don't know anything about that game his son is involved in, but beer and pot are transient; those cards, presumably, last--or at least get traded for other cards?

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I live in the city, but it's a residential area and not quite walkable. There are stores and coffee shops and a library, but all 7 to 9 blocks away -- technically walking distance, but not a walk you'd typically make if the weather's bad or you're buying a week's worth of groceries for three people.

Yeah, I would have a problem if I had to buy groceries for more than one person, and I do have to shop every week.

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I think companies also pay you to promote their products. As I recall, there's a passage in there saying MMM does this. He got in a tiff with Chase Bank because they wanted him to stop swearing and he told them to bug off. Which seems an odd choice of term, considering the complaint.

I got that; even as I type this, I'm looking at ads for Duluth Trading Company on the side of my screen (and that's a company whose web site I regularly check out, btw). But I'm still wondering how all this comes together. But as I said, that's probably better dealt with somewhere else. I'm not planning on trying to become a professional blogger; I'd just like to understand how it all comes together.

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There's a vacuum-cleaner repair shop about five minutes from my house. A five-minute drive, that is. If I had to take it in without a car, it would be quite an ordeal.

Still, you might try googling. There are a handful of vacuum-repair shops in my area, so I assume you have some, too. Though they might not be close enough to carry your vacuum to.

Of course, in the heart of major cities, all kinds of small businesses like that are being forced out by rising rents; that's what happened to a shaver repair shop only a few blocks from my home. These businesses might still exist further out from the center of the city, but then, if you don't have a car and must depend on public transportation, even if you can get to them, you might have to devote an entire Saturday just to taking your vacuum cleaner to be repaired, and another entire Saturday to picking it up when it's ready. Then you have to ask yourself, What's more important, the time involved in getting your old cleaner repaired, or the money just to buy a new cleaner--which you can do by a few clicks on the internet.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1368 on: March 02, 2016, 02:31:32 pm »
But MMM is Canadian, and maybe what I'm taking as scolding is just a certain directness that Canadians have?  ??? (I'm not trying to be a smart-aleck about that; I'm seriously wondering.)

You might be onto something. I have two (French) Canadian friends. One I've never heard say a word against the United States. He's very interested in U.S. sports and is a pleasant fellow. The other is constantly criticizing U.S. politics, its healthcare system, etc. While I often actually agree with him, his manner is so abrasive and smug that I just don't want to hear about it.

Once at a party, my then-husband was in a conversation with the latter guy, who was going on and on about how great Canada is compared to the United States. My ex is actually more interested in Canada than any U.S. person I know -- he always knows who the PM is, and even read a whole book about Canada. But finally he got fed up with this guy's bragging and exclaimed, "But R., it's boring! Canada is fucking boring!" The room went silent, and then everyone burst out laughing.

I've also seen at least one YouTube video and read one Canadian article wondering why Americans are such idiots. Not all Americans as individuals, of course, just some of the more ridiculous politics and beliefs to which many Americans subscribe. The problem is, I couldn't disagree with either one.  :-\

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I got that; even as I type this, I'm looking at ads for Duluth Trading Company on the side of my screen (and that's a company whose web site I regularly check out, btw).

Glad to hear that! I lived in Duluth for five years.

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But I'm still wondering how all this comes together. But as I said, that's probably better dealt with somewhere else. I'm not planning on trying to become a professional blogger; I'd just like to understand how it all comes together.

Well, I think you'd have to start by building up a big readership. I think you can maybe get google ads even if you have relatively few followers. And I believe if you link something on Amazon and a blog reader buys it, you get a small cut. But if you're trying to get big-name sponsors and freebies and $400,000 in ad revenue, I think like any publication you'd have to show the advertisers they'd reach a large audience.

There are all kinds of other tricks to promoting your site and luring readers. During my unemployed years, it was one money-making venture I considered. I even bought a book on it. But it's a lot of work with no guarantee of success.





Offline serious crayons

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Re: In the New Yorker...
« Reply #1369 on: March 02, 2016, 02:40:10 pm »
So from my ripped-out-article pile I've plucked one from last March by Seymour Hersh, recalling his coverage of the My Lai massacre.

He tells an anecdote about coming to St. Paul to speak, and afterward being approached by Hubert Humphrey. After losing the presidential race to Nixon because he was too closely associated with LBJ and the war, Humphrey was teaching at the college where Hersh spoke. Afterwards, Humphrey went to talk to him:

"I have no problem with you, Mr. Hersh," he said. "You were doing your job and you did it well. But as for those kids who march around saying, 'Hey hey LBJ, how many kids did you kill today?' Humphrey's fleshy, round face reddened and his voice grew louder with every phrase. "I say, 'Fuck 'em, fuck 'em, fuck 'em.'"

 :o :o :o  That's doesn't exactly fit the image we Minnesotans cherish of our beloved Happy Warrior!