Author Topic: Resurrecting the Movies thread...  (Read 677808 times)

Offline BelAir

  • BetterMost 1000+ Posts Club
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,401
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #530 on: December 31, 2007, 10:35:39 pm »
I recently got the DVD, haven't watched it yet.  Will remedy that soon.
Did you watch Hotel Rwanda ?  (that's another one I want to check out)

Hotel Rwanda is on my Netflix list but I haven't seen it yet.  Let us know what you think of Last King.  I did not know anything about Idi Amin before watching the movie.
"— a thirst for life, for love, and for truth..."

Offline Lumière

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • BetterMost 5000+ Posts Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,283
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #531 on: January 01, 2008, 12:00:30 am »
Hotel Rwanda is on my Netflix list but I haven't seen it yet.  Let us know what you think of Last King.  ...

Will do.

I saw Robots tonight....loved it!
If you haven't seen it yet, check it out when you feel like taking a light, entertaining break from more 'serious' movies.. :)


Offline MaineWriter

  • Bettermost Supporter!
  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 14,042
  • Stay the course...
    • Bristlecone Pine Press
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #532 on: January 01, 2008, 09:51:08 am »
I watched "For Your Consideration" last night, the latest effort from Christopher Guest & Co. (Waiting for Guffman, Best in Show, A Mighty Wind). I loved his other movies. I didn't see this one in the theater because it had very mediocre reviews but I thought on TV it might be worth a few chuckles. Wrong. It was very disappointing in every way.

Oh well, at least I didn't waste money in the theater or on a DVD!

L
Taming Groomzilla<-- support equality for same-sex marriage in Maine by clicking this link!

Offline serious crayons

  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,269
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #533 on: January 01, 2008, 03:07:23 pm »
Hotel Rwanda is excellent. Very moving, very informative, very shocking and sad and scary. It really gets you thinking about why the U.S. does or doesn't get involved in conflicts in other countries and whether or not they should. There's one scene I'll never forget -- an American TV journalist gets some footage of the carnage in the streets, and the Rwandans hiding out in the hotel are all excited about how, once the world sees what's going on, they'll be saved! And Joaquin Phoenix breaks the news that, no, they'll look up, go, "it's that terrible," and go back to their dinners. Which of course is exactly what happened.

Don Cheadle is magnificent, and all the main actors are good. Despite its subject matter the film isn't particularly graphically violent. Just last night I saw a trailer for another movie about Rwanda, but the stars were all white people. The movie looked good, but in general I hate that practice; it suggests audiences can't connect to movies in which the movies are about black people or Asians unless they have a white star. So I loved that Hotel Rwanda didn't resort to that.





Offline Shasta542

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • BetterMost 5000+ Posts Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,999
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #534 on: January 02, 2008, 09:03:13 am »
Article

2008 movie preview: The 10 most anticipated movies of the new year and more:

http://movies.msn.com/movies/hitlist/12-28-07?GT1=7701&
"Gettin' tired of your dumbass missin'!"

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Offline Kd5000

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • Brokeback Got Me Good
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #535 on: January 02, 2008, 09:17:35 am »
Doesn't look that terribly exciting Shasta.  The Mysterious Case of Benjamin Buttons sounds the most original.  I thought it was going to be more a scifi drama, but Forest Gump was mentioned in the same sentence. 

I watched MAYERLING yesterday, historic epic made in 1968.  I was thinking, wow, historic epics aren't really made anymore and that's too bad. It must cost alot of money to make and I guess the studios wonder if the adults are going to turn out to see it.

Offline MaineWriter

  • Bettermost Supporter!
  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 14,042
  • Stay the course...
    • Bristlecone Pine Press
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #536 on: January 02, 2008, 09:29:21 am »
Article

2008 movie preview: The 10 most anticipated movies of the new year and more:

http://movies.msn.com/movies/hitlist/12-28-07?GT1=7701&

This little tidbit will make Barb groan:

"Bond 22" (Nov. 7)
Currently untitled, director Marc Forster ("The Kite Runner," "Monster's Ball") teams up with screenwriter Paul Haggis ("Crash") and the latest 007, Daniel Craig, for an original story that picks up immediately after the events of "Casino Royale."


It was interesting that there was no mention of "Australia," the massive epic from Baz Luhrman, starring Hugh Jackman and Nicole Kidman. They just wrapped up shooting a few weeks ago--nine months in all. Filming started back in April. They are behind schedule and the release date has been pushed back, but they are still planning on 2008.

L
Taming Groomzilla<-- support equality for same-sex marriage in Maine by clicking this link!

Offline Kd5000

  • BetterMost Supporter!
  • Brokeback Got Me Good
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #537 on: January 02, 2008, 09:55:31 am »
Actually this morning's LA TIMES is already saying award season this year is a bust and gives a list of films for 2008 as Oscar bait.

 :)

"But with awards season pundits are already declaring the 2007awards race a wash (blame those Iraq war films, a lack of big popular hits like "Titanic" and the ongoing writers strike) and it's not a moment too soon to consider next year's hopefuls.

Lots of Oscar favorites are poised to make their return in 2008. From Clint Eastwood, Sam Mendes and Ed Zwick to actors Russell Crowe, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt and actresses Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, Keira Knightley and Kate Winslet. Here is The Envelope's look ahead at Oscar bait in 2008."

Revolutionary Road
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
The Changeling
Here's the full article. There is a slide show of movies to look forward to in 2008

http://theenvelope.latimes.com/awards/oscars/env-prestige08-phoga01jan01,0,6454981.photogallery

Offline MaineWriter

  • Bettermost Supporter!
  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 14,042
  • Stay the course...
    • Bristlecone Pine Press
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #538 on: January 02, 2008, 12:22:32 pm »
My treat over the past two long weekends has been to watch lots of movies, some of them simulcast with Louise, and some on my own. With that in mind, here is my ranking of what I saw:

1. Gods and Monsters (definitely the best of all)
2. Transamerica
3. The Fountain
4. Big Fish
5. Finding Neverland (I liked this alot more than Louise did)
6. Ed Wood
7. The Namesake
8. National Treasure: Book of Secrets (saw in the theater)
9. For Your Consideration
10. The Notorious Bettie Page (this was a big disappointment--it was actually dull!)

Next up...for our next simulcast, we are hoping to watch The Wages of Fear (1953). In the theater, I'll be seeing Atonement, with my daughter. It opens here in Maine on Friday.

I also want to watch Cruising one of these days. I bought the DVD a few months ago and haven't had a chance to see it yet.

L
« Last Edit: January 04, 2008, 08:12:11 am by MaineWriter »
Taming Groomzilla<-- support equality for same-sex marriage in Maine by clicking this link!

Offline MaineWriter

  • Bettermost Supporter!
  • BetterMost Moderator
  • The BetterMost 10,000 Post Club
  • *****
  • Posts: 14,042
  • Stay the course...
    • Bristlecone Pine Press
Re: Resurrecting the Movies thread...
« Reply #539 on: January 02, 2008, 01:00:40 pm »
From today's New York Times:

January 2, 2008

A Film Year Full of Escapism, Flat in Attendance


By BROOKS BARNES

LOS ANGELES — Despite a modest increase in 2007 box office receipts, moviedom is trudging into January with a droop in its shoulders.

Ticket sales at North American movie theaters totaled $9.7 billion, a 4 percent increase over the previous year, according to Media by Numbers, a box office tracking company. But attendance was flat, after a narrow increase in 2006 and three previous years of sharp declines. Movie fans bought about 1.42 billion tickets last year, according to Media by Numbers. The high watermark of the last 10 years came in 2002, when moviegoers bought about 1.61 billion tickets.

The results last year were largely driven by expensive sequels like “Spider-Man 3” (the top-grossing film) and “Shrek the Third” (the runner-up), although a handful of expert marketing campaigns turned some oddball entries like “Alvin and the Chipmunks” into bona fide hits. One surefire franchise was born to Paramount and DreamWorks in “Transformers” (which placed third).

Nine of the Top 10 grossing films were science fiction, fantasy or animation. The sole exception (unless you count the mock-historical “300”) was Universal’s action thriller “The Bourne Ultimatum,” which placed sixth with $227 million in domestic ticket sales.

As the movie industry turns its attention to 2008, the dark “No Country for Old Men” is showing box office legs, and one film in particular is already shaping up as a home run. Early results for “Juno,” about a quirky teenager who becomes pregnant, have outpaced those for the indie hits “Little Miss Sunshine” and “Brokeback Mountain.”

“The critical acclaim and award recognition have magnified the movie,” said Peter Rice, the president of Fox Searchlight, which is distributing “Juno.”

But box office results are always a game of glass half-full and glass half-empty, and the half-empties this time seem more prominent.

DVD sales continue to slump both domestically and abroad. The private money that has washed over Hollywood in recent years is starting to slow, investment bankers say, as more hedge funds go home with little to show. And movie executives are worried about the impending collision between striking screenwriters and the important awards shows.

The strike, now in its ninth week with no new talks scheduled, is starting to weigh more heavily on the movie business over all. Until now, the damage has been mostly confined to television, which operates with a shorter production pipeline. But as the strike drags on, movie executives — and their corporate bosses — are starting to worry about having enough time to put together their mega-movie slates for summer 2009.

At the box office the happy surprises of 2007 were almost all confined to escapist offerings like “The Game Plan,” a Walt Disney release about an N.F.L. quarterback and his young daughter, or sophomoric comedies like “Superbad,” a Sony release from the producer Judd Apatow.

But studios have instead churned out gloomy message movies, and more are on the way, noted Paul Dergarabedian, the president of Media by Numbers.

“There were some great films, but the appetite wasn’t there,” he said. Movies rooted in the Iraq war or terrorism — “In the Valley of Elah,” “Rendition,” “Redacted” — particularly struggled. A glut of serious-minded awards hopefuls canceled one another out. Signs of trouble lurked even during the blockbuster-packed summer, in which ticket sales surpassed the $4 billion mark for the first time. Sequels, with the notable exception of “Bourne,” the third in a series, were generally not well reviewed and sold fewer tickets than their second or first installments.

“Shrek the Third,” “Spider-Man 3” and “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” all marked low points for these franchises at the domestic box office when ticket sales are adjusted for inflation, according to Box Office Mojo, another tracking service.

(The studios note that more than half of the ticket sales for each of those titles came from overseas. While there are no reliable independent data for overseas ticket sales, entertainment trade publications estimate that foreign receipts for the six biggest studios increased 9 percent in 2007 over a year earlier, to $9.4 billion.)

Stars did not seem to interest moviegoers, with marquee names playing to empty seats. Angelina Jolie flopped with “A Mighty Heart,” about the murder of the Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, and Nicole Kidman’s career grew chillier with the North American collapse of “The Golden Compass.” Among the men, Tom Cruise struggled to avoid blame for a dead-on-arrival “Lions for Lambs,” and Brad Pitt drew shrugs for “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.”

One big exception: Will Smith cemented his status as a top box office draw — and perhaps the biggest star in the business today — with robust results for “I am Legend,” a Warner Brothers release about a man wandering a post-apocalyptic Manhattan. The picture has sold $195 million in tickets since its Dec. 14 opening, with another $61.3 million coming from overseas, according to Box Office Mojo.

(Denzel Washington also gets credit for helping to turn Universal’s “American Gangster” into a $184 million hit, although he appears to be having a harder time with the just-opened “Great Debaters.”)

Of course results vary by studio, and some are entering 2008 on a high note. Walt Disney, for instance, has played the game better than most.

“Ratatouille” overcame early skepticism about its rat-in-the-kitchen subject to become both a global blockbuster and a critical darling. “Enchanted,” about an animated princess who comes to life, continues to chug away in theaters, and “National Treasure: Book of Secrets” is a slam dunk. That action film, starring Nicolas Cage, sold $124 million in tickets domestically in its first 10 days of release, according to Box Office Mojo.

Mark Zoradi, president of the Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group, cited a recent decision to focus more intently on the company’s brand as a catalyst for its performance. “The Disney name continues to be enormously successful with audiences,” he said.

Twentieth Century Fox appears to be able to sell just about anything. That studio has set the standard for effective Internet marketing by coming up with ways for fans to personalize messages. “The Simpsons Movie,” with its $526 million in total ticket sales around the world, benefited from Simpsonize Me, a Web promotion (simpsonizeme.com) that allowed visitors to animate pictures of themselves. Fox used a similar promotion to fuel “Alvin and the Chipmunks.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/02/movies/02year.html
Taming Groomzilla<-- support equality for same-sex marriage in Maine by clicking this link!