Author Topic: Armie Hammer & Timothée Chalamet find love in Call Me By Your Name (2017)  (Read 335853 times)

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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We are always aware that time is passing, that summer will soon end and that, as in every other coming of age movie, the characters will have to move on. In some respects, the story here is utterly formulaic. What makes the film so magical is the extraordinary delicacy, formal daring and insight with which Luca Guadagnino tackles such familiar material.




http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/reviews/film-reviews-call-me-by-your-name-grace-jones-documentary-bloodlight-and-bami-perfect-blue-base-a8021076.html



Call Me by Your Name
We are in the 1980s and so the family is able to live in its own timeless, self-enclosed world.
★★★★★
By Geoffrey Macnab
@TheIndyFilm

26 October 2017



Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg and Armie Hammer in Luca Guadagnino’s film Call Me By Your Name


Coming of age films set over long, lazy summers constitute a mini-genre in their own right. Few, though, have the freshness or poignancy of Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name. Based on André Aciman’s 2007 novel, it is an account of a gay affair between a teenage boy and a twentysomething graduate student. What is surprising here is the complete lack of guilt and recrimination. This is not one of those movies like Brokeback Mountain  or the recent Yorkshire-set God’s Own Country  in which the lovers face a backlash. They enjoy a “beautiful friendship” which means “everything and nothing”, and there is no price to pay at the end of it.

It’s 1983. We are somewhere in northern Italy. The Perlmans are an affluent and highly cultured American-Jewish family who spend their summer months in an idyllic country house not far from Lake Garda. Mr Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) is an easy-going academic who uses his time in Italy not just to eat, drink and relax but to carry out research into classical antiquity. He has a glamorous wife (Amira Casar) and a precocious 17-year-old son, Elio (Timothée Chalamet). Every year, Perlman hires a research assistant to help him with his paperwork and to join him on his field expeditions in search of classical artefacts.

The tempo here is very much more relaxed than in Guadagnino’s 2015 feature A Bigger Splash, which was also about a summer holiday but whose protagonists were wildly hedonistic filmmakers and rock singers. Here, the Perlmans live at a very leisurely pace.

“What does one do around here?” one newcomer asks.

“Wait for the summer to end,” Elio replies, hinting at the repetitive and even sometimes tedious nature of days spent on field trips, bicycle rides or occasional trips to the local post office.

We are clearly in the 1980s. The film has the same Psychedelic Furs music also found in John Hughes’ bratpack movies of that era to remind us of the fact. However, Guadagnino is also continually making the point that his characters are sharing the same experiences as the classical figures Perlman spends his life researching.

This is a film in which tiny, seemingly throwaway incidents assume, at least in hindsight, a huge totemic importance. We see Elio looking down from a high window with curiosity at the strapping, self-confident young American academic, Oliver (Armie Hammer), stepping out of a car as he arrives to work as Mr Perlman’s assistant. Elio is irritated because he has had to give his bedroom to the newcomer. There is a strange moment in which Oliver is showing off his athletic ability playing volleyball with the locals and then touches Elio on the shoulder.

Elio is a mix of arrogance and vulnerability. He can be very cruel. His behaviour toward the beautiful young neighbour Marzia (Esther Garrel) with whom he begins a short-lived affair is offhand in the extreme. She is the only one in the film really made to suffer.

Call Me By Your Name  was co-scripted by James Ivory (the filmmaker behind Remains Of The Day, A Room With A View, Maurice  and all those other upscale literary adaptations). Ivory was originally going to direct too but he would surely have made a very different kind of film. Guadagnino has a formal boldness, flamboyance and willingness to push his material to extremes that Ivory lacks. In particular, he deals in frank and sometimes comic fashion with the sexuality of the adolescent hero. Elio is capable of some very crude behaviour. We see him masturbating into an overripe piece of fruit and burying his head in his lover’s swimming trunks. The director also has a fetishistic way of filming the lovers’ bodies, as if they are contemporary equivalents to the young gods portrayed in the classical art that so fascinates Elio’s father.

Hammer is exceptional in a role a very long way removed from The Man From UNCLE  or The Lone Ranger. He plays Oliver as a dashing narcissist who expects everything to come easily to him. “Later!” is his habitual expression when he leaves a social gathering because he has somewhere better to go to. He is always on the lookout for his own pleasure. At the same time, there is nothing predatory in his relationship with Elio. If anything, Elio is the one who targets him. Timothée Chalamet is equally striking as the teenager desperate for new experiences, on the cusp of adulthood and trying to work out his own identity. Both lovers are outsiders. They know, as one puts it, “what it’s oike toi be the odd Jew out”. Perhaps the most surprising performance is from Stuhlbarg as the wise and endlessly patient father who knows exactly what is going on.

As in A Bigger Splash, Guadagnino films landscape in a Sunday supplement travel-brochure-like way. With its sequences of idyllic bike rides down country lanes, dips in outdoor pools, moonlight dancing and long leisurely outdoor lunches in romantic settings, Call Me By Your Name  offers an idealised, tourist-eye view of its little corner of northern Italy. The weather (at least until the equally picturesque snowbound scenes late on) is always balmy. We are in the 1980s and so the family is able to live in its own timeless, self-enclosed world. Elio may watch TV and listen to his battered old transistor radio but there are no smartphones to distract them.

We are always aware that time is passing, that summer will soon end and that, as in every other coming of age movie, the characters will have to move on. In some respects, the story here is utterly formulaic. What makes the film so magical is the extraordinary delicacy, formal daring and insight with which Guadagnino tackles such familiar material.

Director. Luca Guadagnino, 132 mins
Starring: Armie Hammer, Timothée Chalamet, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel, Victoire Du Bois



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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 Peter Spears
                                       @pjspears


5:22 AM - 27 Oct 2017
159 Retweets 592 Likes


https://twitter.com/pjspears?lang=en&lang=en
https://twitter.com/pjspears/status/923887507145707521

Call Me By Your Name opens today in UK
meanwhile back in LA a friend
sent me this photo of a new billboard on Sunset Blvd.






"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
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by Never Too Late (olga-jl)









http://www.gramunion.com/olga-jl.tumblr.com/163978021544
http://laterpeaches.tumblr.com/post/164022101411
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Timmy

by Never Too Late (olga-jl)



10th august 2017 391 Likes

#timothée chalamet  #elio  #elio perlman  #armie hammer  #oliver  #ulliva  #actor
#call me by your name  #cmbyn  #andré aciman  #luca guadagnino  #lgbt
#movies  #film #lgbtmovie  #oscar
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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by Never Too Late (olga-jl)



  






From:







Also see:


by @carolamarin.art



"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Little White Lies 71: The Call Me by Your Name issue

Little White Lies 71: The Call Me by Your Name issue






CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANMERCH
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https://callmebyyourname-movie.tumblr.com/






My 'little white lies' magazine finally arrived!!!
Beyond happy rn!!!

















"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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How
Call Me by Your Name
became a queer literary phenomenon


Fans of André Aciman’s 2007 novel
reflect on what makes it so special.


By CLAIRE BIDDLES
PUBLISHED 21 OCT 2017



The first time I read ‘Call Me by Your Name’ I stayed up until 4am to finish it, then immediately started over again. I’d read dozens of queer coming-of-age novels, dozens of bittersweet love stories, but nothing quite like this – a story of a once-in-a-lifetime love between precocious 17-year-old Italian Elio and 20-something cocksure American academic Oliver, played out over a brief six week period but recalled over and over for a lifetime.

It felt like the oldest story ever told and a freshly drawn secret, as though its writer, André Aciman, had articulated a collective memory of longing for the very first time. Its beauty lay in its diminutive moments, in its long, drawn-out descriptions of seconds-long glances between Elio and Oliver. My reaction during that first reading was almost more physical than intellectual, something more akin to a crush on a person, or a the way a heart skips during a particular key change in a pop song. It certainly wasn’t anything I had experienced reading a book before.

Before its release, Aciman was known for his nonfiction, chronicling his early life in the 1995 memoir ‘Out of Egypt’, and collating criticism on the work of Marcel Proust for the 2001 essay collection ‘The Proust Project’ .‘Call Me by Your Name’ is his first novel, and it is all the more miraculous because it seemingly came from nowhere.

Since its release in 2007, the book has been a slow-burn kind of literary sensation, gaining new fans through enthusiastic word-of-mouth. Jim MacSweeney, manager of Gay’s the Word, the UK’s only dedicated LGBT bookshop, has seen the popularity of the book grow from the very beginning: “We sold a few copies when it first came out, then noticed that people were coming back to buy second copies for friends,” he tells me. “It’s always been an easy book to sell – it’s a love story, but it’s not sentimental. It captures something that we all feel but that is rare in fiction. It’s a really special book.”

It’s difficult to quantify what makes the book so special, what makes it so resonant in a sea of thousands and thousands of love stories, so much so that it has become a personal talisman for its thousands of fans. Sarah Dollard, a London-based screenwriter for Doctor Who and Being Human, and a huge fan of CMBYN, describes the first time she read the book: “It was less thinking and more… feeling. A lot. Clutching the book to my chest, tearful sighs… I read a lot of romance, about half of it queer, and most of it follows a formula. Not to sniff at formula – I only read writers who wield it beautifully. But CMBYN doesn’t do that, it is its own thing. A gorgeously written gut punch.”

This tension of physicality and emotional potency came up again and again when I spoke to other fans of the book. When Rachel Huskey, a student from Texas, first read it, she “didn’t know whether to laugh or cry, I just remember laying in bed, staring at the ceiling, and thinking about this novel for over an hour. That had never happened to me before, it just struck me so harshly in my chest and I didn’t know how to feel. My diary entry from that day says, ‘I have a fierce desire to consume this book and I don’t know how to do it.’”

When I re-read the book last year, spurned on by the announcement of the film adaptation, it was alongside two of my friends who were reading it for the first time. We would gather in a Twitter group chat every day to pore over details of each chapter, and – crucially – discuss frankly how it revealed integral truths of the possibilities of love and desire to us, which felt especially powerful in the muddy contemporary midst of casual dating and impersonal hookup apps.

One of the other participants in this informal book club, Sophie, recalls how, “every one of our interpretations and reactions to this novel was valid, vivid, and valued. Recollections of old loves, missed opportunities, the anger and disappoint of our current stumbles through the wilds of 2010s dating… This book stripped things from me that I hid from myself, it opened up what I want love – or the idea of love – to be, and how I want my muscles to burn as I reach out for it. Like Elio, looking back over that summer with each added year of wisdom and lived experience, each re-read of CMBYN feels like a space to reflect, and hone our own needs through the lens of this one specific romance.”

For all that CMBYN describes complex romantic and sexual feelings that almost everyone can match themselves up to, it’s also full of the specificities of queer experience, refreshingly removed from the constraints of a traditional coming-out narrative. Josh Winters, a writer and musician from San Francisco, recognises the importance of this for queer readers: “Many stories about young men coming to terms with their sexuality are concerned with how they navigate the “coming out” process, usually framing it as a required rite of passage (which is it not), but Aciman is purely interested in exploring how a young man comes to embrace his desire for another man removed from any idea of potential sociopolitical impact.” It’s this removal from blatantly political context that is an unspoken requirement of queer novels that makes CMBYN so refreshing.

Eoin Dara, a curator based in Dundee, addressed the duality of the universal and the specifically queer in an email to me: “The language of longing and desire and uncertainty could be about any blossoming love affair, it’s pretty expansive and universal. But then in other ways, it’s so inexplicably caught up in the invisible politics of queer desire; the politics of looking. I love how it focuses detail so minutely on eye contact in parts: Something that’s so central to queer communication – silent, unspoken understandings and messages that bounce around public space and crowded rooms full of oblivious straights.”

There’s nothing more anxiety-inducing than the anticipation of a new version of something you love so, so much – especially if its whole worth and magic lies in its atmospherics and coded glances; the most difficult things to translate to film. It’s these ephemeral details that are most anticipated among fans of the book. “There’s a lot of small things about the story that are what give the big scenes their value,” says Rachel. “The footsie, the touch during volleyball… it’s about them being so syndicated with each other that they don’t hide anything anymore.”

Jim echoes this sentiment: “Not that much happens in the book: It’s about tension, desire, longing, rather than big events. I last read it 10 years ago and I don’t even remember the character names, but what I do remember is how Aciman captures that feeling of being aware of another person in a room, and that being all that matters. And I’m interested to see how that is translated in the film.” When asked about seeing the film, Eoin confesses that “I’m so nervous about seeing it. I hope the script is sparse, I hope the looks are long.”

In February this year, I queued up outside a cinema at the Berlinale, shaking equal parts with late-winter cold and with nerves about seeing Call Me by Your Name  for the first time. I shared the same concerns as other fans of the book: This was such a precious thing, I felt like I owned it to an extent – how could I trust anyone else to understand it so fully, to feel it so completely? But the film was wonderful, lacking some of the specific narrative details of the book but so rich with what was really important: the feeling, the atmosphere, the intangibility. It is perfectly cast and perfectly paced. I wept solidly for the last 45 minutes, feeling slightly embarrassed when the lights came up and the rush of reality set back in.

There must have been a thousand people in the packed-out cinema, but it still felt like mine. “Now that the trailers are out and the press is being done in the lead up to the film’s release, it does feel a bit like when your little secret band makes it big,” says Sophie. “But now that it’s more widespread, I still don’t have a desire to discuss it beyond my little group. I am much more fulfilled to pass an image of farmer’s market peaches, or buy an exceptionally loose and wind-swept shirt to keep CMBYN present and tangible outside of the page.”

As more and more people are drawn to the book through the film release, and through passed-on copies, word-of-mouth recommendations and informal book clubs like ours, its pages will still be there for me – for all of us – as an intimate, personal comfort, to be read and felt until early in the morning for years to come.






"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy


by @sirayy

Peachy

CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy



3:12 PM Oct 15, 2017 24 Notes, 363 Likes

Fan Art / Digital Art / Drawings / @sirayyg
#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva  #laterpeaches 🍑
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#digitalpainting #fanart #fanartdigital











by JGiampietro


I love the book and can’t wait for the movie.
I had to draw them!



CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by JGiampietro
http://jgiampietro.tumblr.com/




Oct 7, 2017 47 Notes







by @sirayy

CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy



Sep 21, 2017 6 Notes, 410 Likes

« Last Edit: November 27, 2017, 05:07:27 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
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by @sirayy

I remember everything--
But--
If you remember everything--


CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by @sirayy
http://www.pictaram.org/sirayy



8:08 AM Oct 20, 2017 9 Notes, 311 Likes

Fan Art / Digital Art / Drawings / @sirayyg
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Eagle-eye! Obviously taken from:



Scene/Behind the scene--


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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In the meantime, Luca Guadagnino fills the frame with images that are fairly throbbing with symbolic resonance. The boys’ two bicycles leaning against a wall, intertwined, one handle bar hooked through the frame of the other. The camera lingers on ripe fruit of the villa’s orchard – peaches figure prominently, and creatively. Cigarettes are passed, with offhand intimacy, from lips to lips.




https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/29/call-me-by-your-name-review-peach-of-a-romance

Call Me By Your Name
The Observer





Call Me by Your Name
is a peach of a romance
Timothée Chalamet is superb in a sensuous gay love story set in Lombardy
★★★★★
by Wendy Ide
Sunday 29 October 2017 04.00 EDT



Armie Hammer and, with a face as sensual and sculpted as a fallen angel from a Caravaggio painting, the ‘simply astonishing'
Timothée Chalamet in Call Me by Your Name




There is a moment just before a teenage crush bursts its dam and becomes a fully fledged first love. It’s a moment in which time is briefly suspended; it’s that shiver of uncertainty before you dive over the edge of the waterfall into the kind of love you could drown in. It’s this – the exquisite torture of not knowing if feelings are reciprocated followed by the helpless flood of emotions – that is captured so intensely and urgently in this gorgeous work of yearning. Director Luca Guadagnino has a gift for romance.

This adaptation of the novel of the same name by André Aciman, penned by James Ivory, forms the concluding part of Guadagnino’s Desire trilogy, following I Am Love  (2009) and A Bigger Splash  (2015). Of the two, the new film has far more in common with the lush, luxuriant sensuality of the former than the crackling comedy and riotous misbehaviour of the latter.

Both Call Me By Your Name  and I Am Love  explore the dance between two people who are uncontrollably attracted to each other. In this case, it is Elio (Timothée Chalamet), the precociously cultured 17-year-old son of an archaeology professor (Michael Stuhlbarg), and Oliver (Armie Hammer), the emphatically confident American graduate student interning with the professor and his family at their Bertoluccian summer home in Lombardy. It’s uncharted territory for both. They posture and pose for each other, shirtless and sun-kissed, but there’s an uncertainty that makes both hold back. For a while at least.

In the meantime, Guadagnino fills the frame with images that are fairly throbbing with symbolic resonance. The boys’ two bicycles leaning against a wall, intertwined, one handle bar hooked through the frame of the other. The camera lingers on ripe fruit of the villa’s orchard – peaches figure prominently, and creatively. Cigarettes are passed, with offhand intimacy, from lips to lips.

Having evocatively used excerpts of John Adams’s The Chairman Dances  in I Am Love, Guadagnino once again marries music to the movie with an instinctive eloquence. In an acknowledgment of the teenage central character – Elio is a gifted multi-instrumentalist – piano features heavily. There’s a hopeful rippling motif, which swirls and eddies like Elio’s adolescent hormones. The film’s setting, in 1983, also makes its presence known, in the form of a few endearingly cheesy period pop songs. Most potent are the wistful original compositions by Sufjan Stevens, played on heartstrings and angst, which give the emotional trajectory of the story a stinging rawness.

But for all the confidence of the film-making, the thing that really elevates this picture to one of the very best of the year is the exceptional quality of the performances. On a second viewing, I become fascinated by Amira Casar, playing Elio’s mother, Anella. Her clear, calm gaze locks on to her husband and her son as she translates a German fable to them, asking unspoken questions of both. “Is it better to speak or to die?”

Stuhlbarg, meanwhile, carries a remarkable scene, perhaps the most important in the film. It’s a speech in which he effectively rips open his chest and bares his heart to his son. Hammer, while technically a little mature for the role, captures the gilded alpha male certainty that makes Oliver so attractive; the casually decisive way that he moves through the world unsettles Elio. And Chalamet, with his restless, impatient physicality and a face as sensual and sculpted as a fallen angel from a Caravaggio painting, is quite simply astonishing. The final scene of the film – the camera rests on Elio’s face in the foreground as he processes his heartbreak – is first love encapsulated in one, sumptuously sad, single shot.





Well, there's the fallen Caravaggio angel!


     









A few scenes from Call Me By Your Name  taken at a premiere, source unknown.
https://twitter.com/badpostchalamet  @badpostchalamet  timothée updates
https://twitter.com/apeachpricot  @apeachpricot
« Last Edit: December 21, 2017, 08:28:37 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART
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by blue night

O L I V E R
“Is it better to speak or to die?”
L A T E R



CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by blue night
http://camikoz.tumblr.com/




10/30/17 AT 10:06PM 304 Notes

Fan Art / Painting / blue night
#CMBYN   #CallMeByYourName   #cmbyn trailer   #cmbyn discourse
#elio  #elio perlman  #oliver  #ulliva  #peach  #laterpeaches 🍑
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Bust of Heraclitus, 'The Weeping Philosopher' by Johann Christoph Ludwig Lücke  ca. 1757
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heraclitus#Panta_rhei.2C_.22everything_flows.22



Heraclitus of Ephesus  Greek: Ἡράκλειτος ὁ Ἐφέσιος, Hērákleitos ho Ephésios; c. 535 – c. 475 BC) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, and a native of the city of Ephesus, then part of the Persian Empire. He was of distinguished parentage. Little is known about his early life and education, but he regarded himself as self-taught and a pioneer of wisdom. From the lonely life he led, and still more from the apparently riddled and allegedly paradoxical nature of his philosophy and his stress upon the needless unconsciousness of humankind, he was called "The Obscure" and the "Weeping Philosopher".

Heraclitus was famous for his insistence on ever-present change as being the fundamental essence of the universe, as stated in the famous saying, "No man ever steps in the same river twice". This position was complemented by his stark commitment to a unity of opposites in the world, stating that "the path up and down are one and the same". Through these doctrines Heraclitus characterized all existing entities by pairs of contrary properties, whereby no entity may ever occupy a single state at a single time. This, along with his cryptic utterance that "all entities come to be in accordance with this Logos" (literally, "word", "reason", or "account") has been the subject of numerous interpretations.

"This Logos holds always but humans always prove unable to understand it, both before hearing it and when they have first heard it. For though all things come to be in accordance with this Logos, humans are like the inexperienced when they experience such words and deeds as I set out, distinguishing each in accordance with its nature and saying how it is. But other people fail to notice what they do when awake, just as they forget what they do while asleep."






by blue night



ZWISCHEN IMMER UND NIE
BETWEEN ALWAYS AND NEVER
L A T E R



CALLMEBYYOURNAMEFANART by blue night
http://camikoz.tumblr.com/







And obviously from:




"He’s so handsome he should be illegal."









And just because:



“Is it better to speak or to die?” That’s the core question of “Call Me By Your Name,” which surfaces in a scene where a character reads the words of Marguerite of Navarre in “The Heptaméron,” but it’s an idea at the heart of all queer narratives. It’s been especially present in queer cinema, where muteness and survival are often the most bittersweet bedfellows. But “Call Me By Your Name” not only quotes Marguerite’s words, it suffuses them into every fiber of its being. It’s a great film because of how lucidly it poses her question, and an essential one because of how courageously it answers it.

(....)

Leaving us with one of the gorgeous new songs that Sufjan Stevens wrote for the film, this achingly powerful story — a brilliant contribution to the queer cinema canon — breathes vibrant new life into the answer that Marguerite of Navarre gave to her own question. “I would counsel all such as are my friends to speak and not die,” she said, “for ’tis a bad speech that cannot be mended, but a life lost cannot be recalled.”










https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_de_Navarre

Marguerite de Navarre

Her brother became King of France, as Francis I,
and the two siblings were responsible for the
celebrated intellectual and cultural court and
salons of their day in France.
She was the wife of Henry II of Navarre and
was the grandmother of Henry III of Navarre
who became Henry IV of France.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heptam%C3%A9ron

Heptaméron
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The Heptaméron is a collection of 72 short stories written in French by Marguerite of Navarre (1492–1549), published posthumously in 1558. It has the form of a frame narrative and was inspired by The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio. It was originally intended to contain one hundred stories covering ten days just as The Decameron does, but at Marguerite’s death it was only completed as far as the second story of the eighth day. Many of the stories deal with love, lust, infidelity, and other romantic and sexual matters. One was based on the life of Marguerite de La Rocque, a French noblewoman who was punished by being abandoned with her lover on an island off Quebec.

The collection first appeared in print in 1558 under the title Histoires des amans fortunez edited by Pierre Boaistuau, who took considerable liberties with the original version, using only 67 of the stories, many in abbreviated form, and omitting much of the significant material between the stories. He also transposed stories and ignored their grouping into days as envisaged by the author. A second edition by Claude Gruget appeared only a year later in which the editor claimed to have “restored the order previously confused in the first impression”. Also the prologues and epilogues to each short story left out by Boaistuau were put back and the work was given, for the first time, the title Heptaméron  (from the Greek ἑπτά – “seven” and ἡμέρα – “day”) due to the seven-day time frame into which the first 70 short stories are grouped.


"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 11:52:50 pm by Aloysius J. Gleek »
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
"Camping Out"