Author Topic: Cellar Scribblings  (Read 7094619 times)

Offline CellarDweller

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17650 on: September 09, 2022, 03:49:43 pm »

Hiya BetterMost friends!!!!




TGIF!

The temps in the morning have been much cooler, and it feels so good.   I hate waking up and it's already above 80.  This morning it was in the 60s, it was refreshing.

Of course, temps still go up in the afternoon, right now (almost 4) we're up to 80, but given a few weeks ago we were near 100, I'll take it!

Looks to be a quiet weekend on my end, which is fine by me!  ;D


Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!

Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17651 on: September 09, 2022, 06:15:08 pm »
Have a cool weekend friend!

I thought mine was going to be quiet, but it's filling up fast. EdelMar, still traveling (it's been six months!) might want me to show his house to prospective renters tomorrow and M. talked me into going to an opera (an effing opera!) tomorrow night. Something I've never heard of called Cavalleria rusticana. Sunday morning I'm taking a class in forgiveness, which I need, then there's a workshop on building gardens for pollinators, then I might have to show his place again. Sigh...
"chewing gum and duct tape"

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17652 on: September 09, 2022, 09:16:14 pm »
Have a cool weekend friend!

I thought mine was going to be quiet, but it's filling up fast. EdelMar, still traveling (it's been six months!) might want me to show his house to prospective renters tomorrow and M. talked me into going to an opera (an effing opera!) tomorrow night. Something I've never heard of called Cavalleria rusticana. Sunday morning I'm taking a class in forgiveness, which I need, then there's a workshop on building gardens for pollinators, then I might have to show his place again. Sigh...

Now there's a post filled with mildly curious information. Where did EdelMar go on his travels? If he's renting his house out, where will he live when he gets back? This is nosy so no need to answer, but is he independently wealthy or how does one travel for so long -- or is it related to his job, whatever that might be? Don't you like opera? (I mean, I don't, but I would have thought you might.) And what the heck is a class in forgiveness? Is it a church-related thing? And why must you forgive? If you're talking about your former permafrost community, do you really have to forgive them -- or is it to restore your own peace of mind?


Offline southendmd

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17653 on: September 11, 2022, 02:54:25 pm »
Have a cool weekend friend!
 Something I've never heard of called Cavalleria rusticana.

How'd you like it?

This is the famous intermezzo, with our favorite performer, Hauser:


Offline Front-Ranger

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17654 on: September 12, 2022, 06:46:28 pm »
Now there's a post filled with mildly curious information. Where did EdelMar go on his travels?
First he went to Nepal and then when he returned to the States he didn't come all the way home. He stayed on the Eastern Seaboard to visit friends where he formerly lived. Then his former astronomy professor who he has stayed close to all this time (and the three of us have gone on several trips together) talked him in to staying there and building an observatory for him.

If he's renting his house out, where will he live when he gets back? This is nosy so no need to answer, but is he independently wealthy or how does one travel for so long -- or is it related to his job, whatever that might be?
It's a 3-bedroom, 2-bath home and he usually has the second bedroom rented out, using the 3rd bedroom for storage. But the current renter stopped paying rent so he wants to rent to another person, and also might want to rent out his bedroom. I wouldn't want such an arrangement but apparently there are a lot of people in Denver who do.

Don't you like opera? (I mean, I don't, but I would have thought you might.)
Frankly I'm getting tired of opera, particularly classical opera. The storyline is always a variation on the woman who went wrong and is punished by losing her reputation or dying and the men are always strutting around. I don't get excited about the women's lamenting or drama and the men's bravura. But music like the Intermezzo (thanks, Paul!) is beautiful! I also don't like having to give over my entire weekend, as it seems, to a performance, with all of the prep work and spending an hour just trying to get out of the parking lot afterwards, etc.

That said, the Cavalleria rusticana had some very interesting aspects, most notably that the entire orchestra and cast were on the stage. Thus, the conductor became a major player and he was fascinating, the way he used his whole body to bring out the music from the instrumentalists.

And what the heck is a class in forgiveness? Is it a church-related thing? And why must you forgive? If you're talking about your former permafrost community, do you really have to forgive them -- or is it to restore your own peace of mind?
Yes, it's a church class and we're studying The Book of Forgiveness by Desmond Tutu and Mpao Tutu, his daughter. Yes, I'm coming to the conclusion that I have to at least try to forgive those two "permafrost" (love that!) instructors who seized the assets and then destroyed the nonprofit organization.

Mpao's story is interesting. She was an Anglican priest but was excommunicated when she divorced her husband and married a woman. She is now a pastor in the Netherlands.
"chewing gum and duct tape"

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17655 on: September 12, 2022, 07:36:48 pm »
How'd you like it?

This is the famous intermezzo, with our favorite performer, Hauser:



That was divine, friend. I liked the music very much. It captures the lyricism of Sicily. On the last night I was on the island in 2020, we stayed outside of Palermo in the hills and this was my view.
"chewing gum and duct tape"

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17656 on: September 14, 2022, 02:44:03 pm »
The storyline is always a variation on the woman who went wrong and is punished by losing her reputation or dying and the men are always strutting around.

Ugh. I'm surprised that doesn't draw more ire from the feminist community. Plots like that are really dated -- from a time when men didn't really understand women but thought they did, didn't understand gender equity or justice but thought they did. I just saw, maybe in a Facebook post, people trashing Anna Karenina.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17657 on: September 14, 2022, 02:55:32 pm »
Ugh. I'm surprised that doesn't draw more ire from the feminist community. Plots like that are really dated -- from a time when men didn't really understand women but thought they did, didn't understand gender equity or justice but thought they did. I just saw, maybe in a Facebook post, people trashing Anna Karenina.

That's just silly. Anyone from the feminist community (or any community, for that matter) who is going to spend time trashing novels or any works of art from more than a century ago because they don't meet today's standards needs to get a life.

Anybody who tries to do that with opera would run the risk of being pilloried by a bevy of Opera Queens.  ;D
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.

Offline serious crayons

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17658 on: September 15, 2022, 05:37:29 pm »
Or ... That's just silly. Anyone from the feminist Black community (or any community, for that matter) who is going to spend time trashing racist novels or any works of art blackface shows from more than a century ago because they don't meet today's standards needs to get a life.

Don't worry, I haven't heard of any feminists marching against Anna Karenina. But works of old art and literature are obviously going to be full of sexism and racism because most of their creators were sexist and racist, at least to some degree. To say nobody should voice objections is silly, especially because many of those things are still taught as the cannon. I'm not advocating banning them, but it's certainly fair to discuss the perspectives of yesteryear and call them out if appropriate.


Offline Jeff Wrangler

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Re: Cellar Scribblings
« Reply #17659 on: September 15, 2022, 08:56:41 pm »
Or ... That's just silly. Anyone from the feminist Black community (or any community, for that matter) who is going to spend time trashing racist novels or any works of art blackface shows from more than a century ago because they don't meet today's standards needs to get a life.

Don't worry, I haven't heard of any feminists marching against Anna Karenina. But works of old art and literature are obviously going to be full of sexism and racism because most of their creators were sexist and racist, at least to some degree. To say nobody should voice objections is silly, especially because many of those things are still taught as the cannon. I'm not advocating banning them, but it's certainly fair to discuss the perspectives of yesteryear and call them out if appropriate.

It certainly is fair, and I suppose many an academic hour is spent on that. But I wouldn't "call them out." To me that phrase sounds like an attack--like attacking a work because it reflects the time in which it was created.
"It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide."--Charles Dickens.