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BetterMost, Wyoming & Brokeback Mountain Forum  |  Our BetterMost Community  |  The Holiday Forum (Moderator: Meryl)  |  Topic: Recipes - Main & Side Dishes 0 Residents and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
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Author Topic: Recipes - Main & Side Dishes  (Read 35377 times)
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« on: October 29, 2006, 06:48:30 pm »

My contribution for today: the world's easiest pork chops. This is a recipe I got from my grandmother, who wasn't much of a cook. But it is easy and tasty and when the holidays roll around, and cooking is too much trouble, this is a regular in our household. I'll post the original with some variations.

GRAMMY VOSE'S PORK CHOPS

to serve 4

In a baking dish large enough to hold them in one layer, but close together, place 4 PORK CHOPS. Sprinkle with fresh ground pepper and Lawry's Seasoned Salt.

Slice ONE ONION thinly. Place the onion slices over the pork chops, basically trying to cover all the meat.

Open 1 can (14 oz) WHOLE TOMATOES. Place the tomatoes on top of the pork chops and onions. Using a fork (or knife) "smash" the tomatoes, so they are sort of flat on top of everything. (Note: can you tell this is recipe that has never been written down? LOL).

Bake at 350 degrees for one hour.

This is perfect with baked potatoes, since they can cook alongsid he pork chops, also at 350 degrees for an hour.


Variations:

One thing my grandmother didn't have was canned, diced tomatoes with various flavorings: garlic and oregano; basil, etc.  These are good and you can eliminate the "smashing" step.

These can be made with fresh tomatoes, too. If you do that, you might want to add some extra liquid to the pan: V8, tomato juice, or even chicken broth.

Enjoy...

Leslie
« Last Edit: November 20, 2006, 09:01:10 am by MaineWriter » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2006, 08:48:19 pm »

For generations, my family has always had these onions as a side dish with holiday turkey.

Great-Grandma's Onions Parmesan

3 lbs. white onions (the larger the better)
1 cup heavy cream
1 large egg
1/2 to 3/4 cup whole milk
4 oz. finely grated Parmesan cheese
3/4 stick butter

Slice onions 1/4 inch thick.  Melt butter in large skillet and sauté onions slowly until softened, mixing often to separate rings as they lose their shape

Meanwhile, beat egg thoroughly, add cheese and cream and milk.

Just before serving, add egg mixture to onions.  Stir and heat through, then serve (or turn into a casserole dish to be reheated later, about 15-20 minutes.)

Serves 6-8 as a side dish.

Enjoy! 
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2006, 04:50:39 am »

Asparagus Rarebit a la Molly Katzen/Moosewood

2 tbs butter or margarine
2 tbs flour
1 tsp dry mustard
1.5 cups beer or ale at room temperature (OK if flat)
1 cup packed grated cheddar (0.5 lb)
1 tsp prepared horseradish
1 medium clove garlic, minced
salt, black pepper, & cayenne to taste

1) Melt the butter in a medium-sized saucepan.  Sprinkle in the flour & dry mustard, whisking constantly.
2) Add the beer or ale and keep whisking as you bring it to a boil.  Lower the heat annd simmer for about 10 minutes, mixing frequently.
3) Add the remaining ingredients, and stir until the cheese melts.
4) Serve hot oveer steamed vegetables and/or cooked potatoes.
5) Garnish with chunks of ripe tomatoes, tart apples, and/or toasted walnuts.

I bet apples and walnuts would make it Thanksgiving-like.--Lynne
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2006, 09:03:42 am »

My family has certain foods that MUST appear on the holiday table, such as creamed onions. My mother's recipe is to take a jar of boiled onions, put them in a double boiler and pour a pint over cream over, then sprinkle with paprika. Yeah, right, mom. I found this recipe a few years ago and it has become the standard on MY table at Christmas (and various other holidays, too).

GOLDEN CREAMED ONIONS
Serves 8-10

3 lbs pearl onions, blanched in boiling water 2 minutes, drained, and peeled (To peel: blanch in boiling water for 2 minutes, rinse under cool water. Cut off the root and then pop out the onion. While many people find this step tedious and dull, I actually think it is relaxing and therapeutic.)

2 tbsp unsalted butter
1 tsp sugar
3/4 tsp salt
2/3 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley

In a skillet large enough to hold the onions in a single layer (or two if necessary), combine onions, butter, sugar, salt, and enough water to cover the onions by a 1/2-inch and bring mixture to boil. Boil until the liquid is almost evaporated and continue cooking, swirling pan, until the onions are golden and they begin to brown. Add the cream and continue swirling pan until cream thickens and colors (about 2 minutes). Stir in parsley, season with salt and pepper. This dish can be prepared a day or even more in advance and can be reheated in a microwave, a skillet over low heat, or in a slow oven.


Leslie
« Last Edit: November 23, 2006, 11:27:20 am by MaineWriter » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2006, 09:07:01 am »

This isn't a holiday recipe, but we got talking about it in chat and I said I would post here. Easy and delicious and elegant enough to serve to company.

LESLIE'S SIGNATURE SCALLOPS AND ZUCCHINI ON CAPELLINI

to serve 4

3 cloves garlic, chopped or crushed
2-3 zucchini, cut in matchstick juliene
1 lb scallops, cut into pieces if large
a generous amount of chopped fresh parsely
a few tablespoons of chopped fresh basil (dried is acceptable if fresh is not available)
a generous amount of grated cheese (I like Grana Padano, but Parmesan or Romano are also fine)

1 lb capellini (angel hair) - I like DeCecco. You can also use linguine or spaghetti--whatever you like, but the capellini is my favorite.

Have a large pot of boiling water ready for the pasta. Cook according to the package...DeCecco capellini takes 2 minutes. Spaghetti takes 12 minutes.

You need to time the pasta to the scallops/zucchini. If using spaghetti, put it in when you start to melt the butter. If using capellini, put it in when you add the parsely to the skillet.

In a large flat skillet, heat 2 tbsp. butter with 2 tbsp. olive oil over medium-high heat. Add garlic and cook for a second, then add the zucchini.  Cook for a minute or two and then add the scallops. Cook until until the scallops turn opaque (another minute or so). Add parsely, basil, and several grinds of fresh pepper. At the very last second, add cheese and stir. The cheese will melt and you need to get if off the heat fast so it doesn't get rubbery.

Drain pasta and place in serving bowl, cover with scallops and zucchini. Sprinkle with a bit more cheese and garnish with lemon wedges.

Serve immediately.
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2006, 12:51:17 pm »

The Main Event on Thanksgiving is Turkey, and here is a new Twist on turkey:

Ingredients:
1 whole  turkey  (weight is dependent on how many servings are required)
1 large lemon, cut into halves
sprig of rosemary
salt and pepper to taste
butter or olive oil, whichever you prefer

Heat oven to 350 degrees

Rub butter or oil over the skin of the  turkey until it is completely coated

Take a knife and gently separate the skin from the breast meat;

Slide lemon halves under the skin with the peel side up. This way the juice from the lemon will coat the breast.
Season skin of  turkey to your preference, place sprig of rosemary into the  turkey.

Cover and place in oven for   30-45 minutes. Remove cover and continue
to roast until juices run clear, basting every 15-20 minutes depending on the size of the bird.

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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2006, 07:18:09 pm »

Can't say this is my favorite, but it is a "must" for the holidays here in the midwest. We Minnesotans just love a good hot dish.

Green Bean Casserole
From: Campbell's Kitchen
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Bake Time: 30 minutes
Serves: 6
This traditional classic features green beans and Campbell's® Cream of Mushroom Soup topped with savory, crunchy French fried onions.

Ingredients:
1 can (10 3/4 oz.) Campbell's® Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup OR
Campbell's® Condensed 98% Fat Free Cream of Mushroom Soup
1/2 cup milk
1 tsp. soy sauce
Dash ground black pepper
4 cups cooked cut green beans
1 1/3 cups French's® French Fried Onions

Directions:
MIX soup, milk, soy, black pepper, beans and 2/3 cup onions in 1 1/2-qt. casserole.
BAKE at 350°F. for 25 min. or until hot.
STIR . Sprinkle with remaining onions. Bake 5 min.

TIP: Use 1 bag (16 to 20 oz.) frozen green beans, 2 pkg. (9 oz. each) frozen green beans, 2 cans (about 16 oz. each) green beans or about 1 1/2 lb. fresh green beans for this recipe.
--For a change of pace, substitute 4 cups cooked broccoli flowerets for the green beans.
--For a creative twist, stir in 1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese with soup. Omit soy sauce. --Sprinkle with 1/4 cup additional Cheddar cheese when adding the remaining onions.
--For a festive touch, stir in 1/4 cup chopped red pepper with soup.
For a heartier mushroom flavor, substitute Campbell's® Condensed Golden Mushroom Soup for Cream of Mushroom Soup. Omit soy sauce. Stir in 1/4 cup chopped red pepper with green beans.


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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2006, 07:35:47 pm »

Can't say this is my favorite, but it is a "must" for the holidays here in the midwest. We Minnesotans just love a good hot dish.

Hot dish? Sounds very Lut'eran of you. (Unlike those uppity Episcopalians, who'd call it a casserole. ...)

 Grin  Wink  laugh
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2006, 08:07:26 pm »

Can't say this is my favorite, but it is a "must" for the holidays here in the midwest. We Minnesotans just love a good hot dish.


Leslie, just dance on over to the leftover thread for everyone's favorite casserole...the ultimate hot dish in my book!

And in case anyone didn't realize, this year is the 50th anniversary of Green Bean Casserole.

Leslie
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2006, 11:54:58 am »

FANCY POTATO LATKES

2 cups raw grated potatoes (about 4 small)
1 large or 2 medium eggs, beaten
2 tablespoons flour
1 small onion, grated
1 small or 1/2 medium apple, grated (OPTIONAL)
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. pepper
cooking oil

Combine the grated potato and onion; drain the liquid out with a colander or squeeze out with cheesecloth or other thin fabric. Combine with all the other ingredients and mix well.

Drop by spoonfuls onto a greased frying pan and saute at medium-high heat until brown and crisp on each side.

These are especially good eaten with applesauce.
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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2006, 03:39:48 am »

We had  a new dish this year on the Thanksgiving Table and I have to say it was surprisingly good and an excellent accompaniment to the turkey..

--Corn Pudding Recipe--


Ingredients:

1 package Jiffy corn muffin mix, dry
2 Eggs
2 cans Regular corn, half drained, half undrained
1 can Creamed corn
¼  teaspoon Nutmeg
½  teaspoon Pepper
8 ounces Sour cream
2 tablespoons Butter


Directions:

Mix all ingredients. Grease 9x13-inch pan and pour in batter. Dot with butter; bake at 350 F for 45 minutes to 1 hour 10 minutes. Cut in squares and serve.

This recipe serves 8


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« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2006, 12:39:26 pm »

Thanks for that Corn Pudding recipe, Dot.  I've been wanting one ever since I lost my mom's friend's good recipe.

What size cans do you mean, the little ones or the regular size?
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« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2006, 09:42:38 pm »

Thanks for that Corn Pudding recipe, Dot.  I've been wanting one ever since I lost my mom's friend's good recipe.

What size cans do you mean, the little ones or the regular size?

oops sorry Meryl I just assumed, called my soon to be mother-in-law and she confirmed, it's the regular size.  Cheesy  She also said when draining the liquid it's better to err on too little than too much retained.
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« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2006, 08:48:02 pm »

I wanted to share this with you all.

---Kelpersmek's Signature Warmed Crispybread---

Ingredients:

2 medium slices plain white bread
1 tsp olive-oil margarine

Directions:

heat the bread gently and evenly on both sides until it begins to change in colour to a rich orange-yellow colour.  You may find the crusts turn slightly darker, but do not be alarmed.
You can buy a machine to help you do this, or alternatively use an ordinary grill.  You can also use an open fire, or a blowtorch, as long as you are careful to heat evenly across the surface.

Remove the bread slices from the heat source, and set to one side.
Immediately, while they are still very hot, spread a thin layer of the olive-oil margarine across the top of the warmed crispybread.  Allow it to soak into the surface. 
Important: ONLY SPREAD ON ONE SIDE PER SLICE!


This dish serves 1 as a snack with tea of coffee, but can also be served with beans for a more substantial meal.

-K
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« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2006, 10:27:11 pm »

Now that's what I call keeping it simple, Kelp!  I can't wait to try the blowtorch version.  Grin
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« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2006, 11:10:57 pm »

Hi Alan, thanks for this clever recipe.  I tried it today.  I can now proudly say that I've had Scottish cuisine.  Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2006, 10:59:40 am »

I wanted to share this with you all.

---Kelpersmek's Signature Warmed Crispybread---

Ingredients:

2 medium slices plain white bread
1 tsp olive-oil margarine

Directions:

heat the bread gently and evenly on both sides until it begins to change in colour to a rich orange-yellow colour.  You may find the crusts turn slightly darker, but do not be alarmed.
You can buy a machine to help you do this, or alternatively use an ordinary grill.  You can also use an open fire, or a blowtorch, as long as you are careful to heat evenly across the surface.

Remove the bread slices from the heat source, and set to one side.
Immediately, while they are still very hot, spread a thin layer of the olive-oil margarine across the top of the warmed crispybread.  Allow it to soak into the surface. 
Important: ONLY SPREAD ON ONE SIDE PER SLICE!


This dish serves 1 as a snack with tea of coffee, but can also be served with beans for a more substantial meal.

-K

Ellemeno calls this scottish cuisine, but would cowboys have made this as well?
I am wondering if you can use presliced bread here, or even whole grain bread.
Seems like it might work for french and italian breads too.
Could real butter work on this hot surface as well?
This machine you talk about, would you find it at specialty stores? or do you have to get married to get one?
Would it be served with a fork as well as a knife??
I think I will build a blazing fire and try this out.

Toast
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« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2006, 11:13:17 am »

---Kelpersmek's Signature Warmed Crispybread---

Excellent recipe, but I found it tedious to prepare.  I do have a toaster so a blowtorch wasn't needed, but I misread your instructions and buttered the toaster instead of the bread.  My second attempt didn't work out either, as I attempted to toast the butter, and then spread the bread on that.  Very unsatisfactory.  Phillip helped me with the third attempt where I held a piece of toasted bread, he held a knife with butter on it, and we ran towards each other.  That worked, and the scars should be healing soon.

But what I found worked best for me was not pretending I could cook and simply buying this in the grocery store.  I found that Kraft Foods now offers "K.C. McToasties."  It's pre-toasted and pre-buttered bread that you simply put in the microwave.  It's good, but I wish it came in more varieties.  They only have "Light" and "Dark  Their web site says "Medium" is also available, but only in select stores on the West coast.  I guess they're test marketing it now.

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« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2006, 01:08:06 pm »

Ellemeno calls this scottish cuisine, but would cowboys have made this as well?
I am wondering if you can use presliced bread here, or even whole grain bread.
Seems like it might work for french and italian breads too.
Could real butter work on this hot surface as well?
This machine you talk about, would you find it at specialty stores? or do you have to get married to get one?
Would it be served with a fork as well as a knife??
I think I will build a blazing fire and try this out.

Toast

Leave it to the ToastMeister to come up with the really important questions.  Grin

Phillip helped me with the third attempt where I held a piece of toasted bread, he held a knife with butter on it, and we ran towards each other.  That worked, and the scars should be healing soon.

 laugh  laugh  laugh
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« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2006, 02:32:22 pm »

Thank you, John. I laughed so much, I ended up having to share your commentary with people in the offices all around me!!
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« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2006, 02:40:58 pm »

okay, Leslie (mainwriter) asked me to post this recipe over here, when we were in the chatroom and i told her my husband was preparing dinner and i was giving instructions.

I've never written a recipe in english and english is not my native language, so bear with me  Grin

Raie au beurre noire or Raie with browned butter

serves 4

Poach 4 wings (small) or 2 large wings of raie in water with 1 slice of onion added and seasoned with some salt and a few black peppercorns. Depending on the size of the fish, this shoud take about 15 minutes.

prepare the sauce: melt a good (and i mean good, this is no recipe for those who are counting calories) nob of good butter (certainly not margarine) over a hot fire until it browns. Add cappers and, if you like some lemon juice.

Put the fish on a serving dish and pour the sauce over the fish. Serve with mashed potatoes and spinach.
Yummy!!

This was one of my mum's favorites! I get real nostalgic eating this.

smakelijk!  Smiley (Enjoy)
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« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2006, 02:56:33 pm »

Fabienne, that sounds great.  Did your mum serve this around the holidays?

By the way, we often call raie either "stingray" or "skate".

Bon appetit,
Paul
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« Reply #22 on: December 01, 2006, 03:24:08 pm »

Fabienne, that sounds great.  Did your mum serve this around the holidays?

By the way, we often call raie either "stingray" or "skate".

Bon appetit,
Paul

no Paul, but leslie said it was okay to post a 'non holiday' dish over here too. Although, if i'm not mistaken, the skate is at its best this time of year. I don't remember eating this during the summer . i thought it was 'skate' but my dictionary told me otherwise, maybe i should get myself a new one  Smiley
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« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2006, 03:54:29 pm »


This machine you talk about, would you find it at specialty stores? or do you have to get married to get one?


That means in most places only heterosexual people could have this appliance.  And only those who have gone through a legal ceremony first.  I guess this why there are always toasts at these kind of events.  I wish anyone who wanted one of these gadgets could own one.    Undecided

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« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2006, 04:49:02 pm »

no Paul, but leslie said it was okay to post a 'non holiday' dish over here too. Although, if i'm not mistaken, the skate is at its best this time of year. I don't remember eating this during the summer . i thought it was 'skate' but my dictionary told me otherwise, maybe i should get myself a new one  Smiley

I believe raie or ray is the Bristish usage, similar to prawns (UK) vs. shrimp (US).

I'll need to look at the fish market. I have actually never cooked skate, but I love seafood. Mashed potatoes and spinach are two of my favorite sides, too.

As for holiday/non recipes...I have posted plenty of the latter. I think the goal is, the more the merrier! That's my take on it, at least.

Leslie
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« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2006, 04:55:45 pm »

Here on the West Coast of the US, it seems like "prawns" refers to bigger shrimp, and "shrimp" refers to the puny kind of little shrimp.

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« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2006, 09:20:33 am »

This will be on the table on Christmas Eve at the Lazy L:

ROASTED RACK OF VENISON AND SHALLOTS WITH DRIED-CRANBERRY GRAVY

Venison is best served rare to medium, as it is a very lean meat that toughens and develops a strong flavor if overcooked. The following recipe may also be made with a 2 1/2-pound beef fillet.

an 8- to 11 rib (3- to 4-pound) rack of venison, halved to form two 4- to 6-rib racks and any tough membranes trimmed
2 pounds shallots, trimmed and peeled
2 tablespoons vegetable oil plus additional for rubbing the venison
1/2 cup beef broth
1/2 cup red wine
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon juniper berries, crushed lightly
2 teaspoons cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons water
1/3 cup dried cranberries
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

Preheat the oven to 425°F. In a roasting pan large enough to hold the venison racks without crowding them, toss the shallots with 2 tablespoons of the oil and salt and pepper to taste and roast them in the middle of the oven, stirring occasionally, for 25 to 30 minutes, or until they are golden. Pat the venison dry, season it with salt and pepper, and rub it generously with the additional oil. Heat a large heavy skillet over high heat until it is hot and in it sear the venison on all sides. Push the shallots to the sides of the roasting pan, stand the venison racks in the middle of the pan, allowing the bones to rest together, and roast the mixture in the middle of the oven for 23 minutes, or until a meat thermometer registers 125°F., for rare meat. Transfer the racks with shallots to a platter and let them stand, covered loosely with foil, for 15 minutes. To the roasting pan add the broth, the wine, the water, and the juniper berries and simmer the mixture, scraping up the brown bits, for 5 minutes. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve set over a small saucepan, whisk the cornstarch mixture, and add it to the saucepan with the cranberries, the vinegar, and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer the gravy, whisking, for 5 minutes. Cut the venison into individual chops and serve it with the shallots and the gravy.

Serves 6.

Enjoy!

Jack
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« Reply #27 on: December 24, 2006, 03:07:42 pm »

That is a tall order to follow, Jack! For Christmas Eve dinner tonight, I wasn't able to get anything fresh because of the Denver blizzard, so I am going to serve a shrimp/scallop empanada with ingredients from my freezer (I did happen to have a couple of tomatoes, and fresh herbs from my sunroom tho.)

Here is a link to the recipe:

http://jumboempanadas.blogspot.com/2006/09/hay-hay-its-donna-day5-or-at-least-it.html
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« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2007, 06:47:43 pm »

Excellent recipe, but I found it tedious to prepare.  I do have a toaster so a blowtorch wasn't needed, but I misread your instructions and buttered the toaster instead of the bread.  My second attempt didn't work out either, as I attempted to toast the butter, and then spread the bread on that.  Very unsatisfactory.  Phillip helped me with the third attempt where I held a piece of toasted bread, he held a knife with butter on it, and we ran towards each other.  That worked, and the scars should be healing soon.

But what I found worked best for me was not pretending I could cook and simply buying this in the grocery store.  I found that Kraft Foods now offers "K.C. McToasties."  It's pre-toasted and pre-buttered bread that you simply put in the -microwave.  It's good, but I wish it came in more varieties.  They only have "Light" and "Dark  Their web site says "Medium" is also available, but only in select stores on the West coast.  I guess they're test marketing it now.

==============================================================



     This really bears repeating.  I think i have seen it here on the shelves in Portland.  Thanks for the heads up John..
                                                                                                                                  janice



         

« Last Edit: November 21, 2007, 01:44:32 pm by Ellemeno » Logged




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« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2007, 08:56:44 am »

According to the New York Times, this is how you do it!

http://video.on.nytimes.com/?fr_story=c8e0efb6c6ee346c3c6bfc1c871d6f5c55e64f14
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« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2007, 09:18:25 am »

According to the New York Times, this is how you do it!

http://video.on.nytimes.com/?fr_story=c8e0efb6c6ee346c3c6bfc1c871d6f5c55e64f14

That's very interesting, Fabienne, and it makes alot of sense. However, I don't like the looks of those thick chunks of white meat. I like my turkey in thin slices!

The video that followed, on how to make dressing, was also very good. I might just use that recipe!

L
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« Reply #31 on: November 21, 2007, 09:23:09 am »


The video that followed, on how to make dressing, was also very good. I might just use that recipe!

L

Let me know what you think of it!


I just knew that Monroe and his electric knife was all wrong!  Cheesy
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« Reply #32 on: November 21, 2007, 09:27:23 am »

Let me know what you think of it!


I just knew that Monroe and his electric knife was all wrong!  Cheesy

The whole thing about carving at the table (as the butcher said) is also wrong. I've known that for years! Some people suggest roasting two turkeys: one for "show" and one to eat!

L
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« Reply #33 on: November 21, 2007, 01:49:50 pm »

The whole thing about carving at the table (as the butcher said) is also wrong. I've known that for years! Some people suggest roasting two turkeys: one for "show" and one to eat!

L


While I wouldn't really do it, I like that image:  All the expectant upturned faces at the table, gazing at the closed kitchen door in hushed anticipation.  Then the the door swings open and the chef comes in carrying the large platter with the whole turkey on it, the guests cheer its arrival.  The chef makes a complete tour around the dining room, and goes back through the kitchen door.  Before the last cheer has stopped echoing, back the chef comes, with an identical platter, but this time with elegantly carved turkey slices arranged on it.  The guests gasp in wonder...
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« Reply #34 on: November 21, 2007, 01:58:02 pm »


While I wouldn't really do it, I like that image:  All the expectant upturned faces at the table, gazing at the closed kitchen door in hushed anticipation.  Then the the door swings open and the chef comes in carrying the large platter with the whole turkey on it, the guests cheer its arrival.  The chef makes a complete tour around the dining room, and goes back through the kitchen door.  Before the last cheer has stopped echoing, back the chef comes, with an identical platter, but this time with elegantly carved turkey slices arranged on it.  The guests gasp in wonder...

That actually would be alot of fun, wouldn't it? You could "roast" the "show" turkey with a blowtorch (which is apparently what food stylists do to give the turkey a perfectly browned exterior for food photos) and then come back with the perfectly cooked and perfectly carved turkey on the platter...

L
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« Reply #35 on: November 21, 2007, 04:03:48 pm »


While I wouldn't really do it, I like that image:  All the expectant upturned faces at the table, gazing at the closed kitchen door in hushed anticipation.  Then the the door swings open and the chef comes in carrying the large platter with the whole turkey on it, the guests cheer its arrival.  The chef makes a complete tour around the dining room, and goes back through the kitchen door.  Before the last cheer has stopped echoing, back the chef comes, with an identical platter, but this time with elegantly carved turkey slices arranged on it.  The guests gasp in wonder...

You wouldn't really do it?? Ow, come on Elle...think about all those gasps..the applause  Cool

Let me know how it goes okay?  Wink  Smiley
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« Reply #36 on: November 21, 2007, 08:16:23 pm »

According to the New York Times, this is how you do it!

http://video.on.nytimes.com/?fr_story=c8e0efb6c6ee346c3c6bfc1c871d6f5c55e64f14

The butcher cum surgeon was on the NBC Nightly News Tonight...I guess he is right in the middle of his 15 minutes of fame. I thought he was rather attractive and something about his rings was ....alluring....LOL

L
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« Reply #37 on: November 22, 2007, 02:48:27 am »

The butcher cum surgeon was on the NBC Nightly News Tonight...I guess he is right in the middle of his 15 minutes of fame. I thought he was rather attractive and something about his rings was ....alluring....LOL

L

I have to say I completely agree with you...I might just go and have another look. After all, we're learning something here aren't we?  Wink
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« Reply #38 on: November 23, 2007, 05:57:45 pm »

For Thanksgiving dinner in previous years, I used to serve grilled peppers, marinated mushrooms, candied walnuts, antipasto, butternut squash and cider soup, roast turkey with oyster stuffing, sweet/sour brussels sprouts, red cabbage with blueberries, Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish, sweet potato puree, cauliflower gratin, beets with dried apricots and creme fraiche, spinach and strawberry salad, and pumpkin/walnut pie. Oh, and spiced peaches. This year, the spiced peaches was all I got to make.

 Cry

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« Reply #39 on: November 23, 2007, 07:37:14 pm »

When I was watching the carving video (see related post, from Fabienne), a second video on making dressing came on. This is the recipe and I made it yesterday...to rave reviews from my family. Since my mother is super-traditional (and likes stuffing stuffed in the turkey), I was thrilled with her strong endorsement of this! I made it with a 12 oz french baguette, fresh tarragon, and walnuts. I'll post the whole article for everyone's enjoyment....

November 15, 2006
THE MINIMALIST; To Stuff or Dress the Bird? James Beard Had It Covered
By MARK BITTMAN

STUFFING, as I've been informed by friends from the South, is properly called dressing when you cook it outside the bird. So I'm officially a big advocate of dressings.

Don't get me wrong: cooking a bread-based mixture inside a turkey is not a bad idea. It adds moisture and flavor to a concoction that can be sadly lacking in both. However, too often stuffing absorbs too much of the cooking juices and comes out of the bird a soggy, unappealing mess. So much for gracing the Thanksgiving table.

But stuffing -- excuse me, dressing -- is always crisp and light if you bake it outside the bird; it takes just a little effort and a few more minutes' work. Your guests will think you're brilliant, especially the vegetarians, because there will be one more dish (and a good one at that) that's vegetarian-friendly.

I'm not speaking as an inventor. The bread stuffing that's been the staple of my Thanksgiving table for 30 years is based on a James Beard recipe, and it was his suggestion to cook it outside the turkey that got me started. Now I'm hooked.

First you make fresh bread crumbs: just whiz a few cups of slightly stale cubes of decent bread -- crust and all, unless it's super-hard -- in a food processor. Keep the crumbs very, very coarse. Cook them with plenty of butter (yes, you can use olive oil) and good seasonings. Baked in a pan, this is delicious, with or without gravy.

From here, the ideas flow freely; this mixture can accommodate giblets, chopped apples, chestnuts, sausage, mushrooms, oysters or other traditional ingredients.

Or you can move in a different direction. Start with whole-grain bread, crumbled and flavored with barely cooked kale and dried fruit, to create what amounts to a bread salad, vinegar and all, that makes for a lovely warm side dish. For a sweeter dish, one that is a crowd pleaser if you are catering to children and real traditionalists, try corn bread with winter squash, cranberries and maple syrup. Finally, there's a rice and nut stuffing that does away with bread altogether.

These dressings have a couple of things in common. Most start with good bread, which is important. Most contain nuts (because some crunch is nice) and butter or oil (because fat is essential for flavor and texture). They can all be made in advance, until the final cooking. (They can even be nearly fully cooked, then returned to the oven for reheating while the turkey rests before carving.) Given these guidelines, they can also be varied almost at will; not only can any bread plug in for any other, you can substitute most of the other ingredients.

And you can cook them in the bird if you prefer, and call them stuffings.

Bread Stuffing
Time: 1 hour

1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter
1 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup pine nuts or chopped walnuts
6 to 8 cups coarse fresh bread crumbs
1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon or sage leaves, or 1 teaspoon dried tarragon or sage, crumbled
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup chopped scallions
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves.

1. Melt butter over medium heat in a large, deep skillet, Dutch oven or casserole. Add onion and cook, stirring, until it softens, about 5 minutes. Add nuts and cook, stirring almost constantly, until they begin to brown, about 3 minutes.
2. Add bread crumbs and tarragon or sage and toss to mix. Turn heat to low. Add salt, pepper and scallions. Toss again; taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Add parsley and stir. Turn off heat. (You may prepare recipe in advance up to this point; refrigerate, well wrapped or in a covered container, for up to a day before proceeding.)
3. Pack into chicken or turkey if you like before roasting, or roast in an ovenproof glass or enameled casserole for about 45 minutes, at 350 to 400 degrees; you can bake this dish next to the bird, if you like. (Or you can cook it up to 3 days in advance and warm it up right before dinner.)

Yield: 6 to 8 cups, enough for a 12-pound bird.
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« Reply #40 on: November 23, 2007, 07:49:23 pm »

That's interesting -- the stuffing/dressing info.

Not once in all my years has anyone made stuffing at one of our holiday gatherings, so I guess dressing is the southern way to go. My cousin now makes the dressing every year and her bread base is cornbread. It's delicious.
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« Reply #41 on: November 23, 2007, 11:35:03 pm »

Thanks for that dressing recipe, Leslie.  It sounds really good.  I just might make it this weekend, since I had dinner at a friend's house and have been feeling the lack of leftovers!  Tongue
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« Reply #42 on: November 24, 2007, 02:17:03 am »

Thanks for that dressing recipe, Leslie.  It sounds really good.  I just might make it this weekend, since I had dinner at a friend's house and have been feeling the lack of leftovers!  Tongue

I said this in another thread - isn't it totally, unnegotiably de rigueur to send guests home with leftovers from Thanksgiving?  In our family, we divide everything up at the end, so that everyone has some of everything they want.  I wouldn't have someone leave here leftoverless anymore than I would kick em out the door!

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« Reply #43 on: November 24, 2007, 02:21:04 am »

I think you're right, Clarissa!  There oughta be a law....  Wink

I'm not sure, but maybe my friend just forgot to give us some leftover turkey.  We did take home extra breadstuffs and cookies, though, which I need like a hole in the head!  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #44 on: November 24, 2007, 02:23:48 am »

I think you're right, Clarissa!  There oughta be a law....  Wink

I'm not sure, but maybe my friend just forgot to give us some leftover turkey.  We did take home extra breadstuffs and cookies, though, which I need like a hole in the head!  Roll Eyes


Well, about 4 or 5 times a year I buy the Stouffer's frozen Roast Turkey dinner, a passable assuager.  We didn't have many leftovers yesterday, and I wish we had more.
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« Reply #45 on: December 22, 2007, 11:59:36 am »

For the Yule I am making a special pot roast and wanted to share my recipe with you. I have adapted it from one that was published years ago in Sunset Magazine.

Brown a large pot roast in a heavy large pot in a little olive oil. Remove the browned roast to a deep plate and pour any accumulated juices over it. Add a little more olive oil to the pot and brown two onions, cut into wedges, adding chopped root vegetables such as parsnips and turnips if you so desire. When these are browned, return the roast to the pot and the juices, adding water and a cup of red wine to cover. If you wish, you can add a couple of handfuls of dried fruit such as prunes, apricots, raisins, etc. and whole blanched almonds. Add a couple of bay leaves and season with fines herbs, salt, and pepper. Cover the pot and turn the heat down to simmer as soon as the liquid comes to a boil. One hour before serving, add quartered potatoes and green vegetables such as broccoli, cut in large chunks, and quartered mushrooms. Add water as necessary. Simmer for at least five hours or all night long.   
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« Reply #46 on: December 24, 2007, 04:21:16 pm »

This is a true southern dish. The grits are creamy and the collards punch up the flavor of the parmesan cheese

10-12 servings
1¼ hours 20 min prep
2 cups whipping cream or half-and-half cream
8 cups chicken broth, divided
2 cups grits, regular
1 (16 ounce) bag collard greens, frozen
1 cup butter
2 1/2 cups parmesan cheese (shredded or grated)
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper (to taste)
1 cup bacon, cooked and crumbled

Grease 13 x 9 baking dish. Bring cream & 6 cups of chicken broth to a boil, stir in grits & cook over medium heat until they return to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover & cook for 25-30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add milk if needed to cook to desire consistency (should resemble slightly runny oatmeal when finished).

Cook collards in remaining 2 cups of chicken broth for 10 minutes. Drain & blot dry with paper towel to remove excess water. Add butter & cheese to grits, stir until butter & cheese melt. Stir in collards. Place in casserole dish, top with crumbled bacon. Bake @ 350 degrees until lightly brown on top.


Disclaimer:  I use instant grits, vegetable broth, spinach, and omit the bacon, so in short, I just wing it...
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« Reply #47 on: December 24, 2007, 05:37:53 pm »

This looks heavenly to me! I musta received a double dose of Southern genes from my mom (she's the one who named me Lee!)

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« Reply #48 on: December 24, 2007, 06:05:51 pm »

Lee - here's a pic of it after we'd dug in:

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« Reply #49 on: November 30, 2008, 01:25:23 pm »

Don't know if this has been posted before, but it was on another board I go to and the person said it made his turkey very moist and flavorful - for those still thinking of turkey for the rest of the holidays:

Roasted cider-brined turkey

Chef Jim Hoban suggests brining the turkey in a large plastic tub outdoors, as long as the temperature stays below 40°. Otherwise, you'll have to make room for it in the refrigerator (someone suggesting lining the refrigerator's crisper for this). Hoban starts with a high temperature of 450°, but because of the sugar content of the brine, we found it too-quickly browned the turkey. We reduced the temperature to 375°.

    * 6 cups water
    * 1 gallon apple cider
    * 1 cup coarse salt
    * 1 cup light brown sugar
    * 4 apples, cored, sliced
    * 1 turkey, about 12 pounds
    * 6 sprigs fresh thyme
    * 6 sprigs fresh oregano
    * 2 sprigs fresh sage
    * 1 medium onion, halved
    * 5 cloves garlic
    * ½ stick (¼ cup) butter, melted
    * Freshly ground black pepper

   1. Combine water, cider, salt, brown sugar and apples in a large pot. Heat to boil over high heat. Remove from heat; cool 1 hour. Transfer to a smaller container if you wish; refrigerate until cold.
   2. Remove giblets from turkey cavity; refrigerate. Place turkey in large tub or cooler; pour brine over to cover. Refrigerate at least 12 hours, turning occasionally.
   3. Heat oven to 375°. Remove turkey from the brine to a rack in a large roasting pan; pat dry. Stuff cavity with fresh herbs, onion halves and garlic. Brush turkey with melted butter; season with pepper. Roast 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 325°; tent with foil. Roast until thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the thigh reads 175°, about 2½ to 3 hours. Let rest 20 minutes before carving.


I find that 375 is too low to brown the skin in 30 minutes, but whatever you try, be prepared to tinfoil individual sections as they brown to avoid burning the skin.

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« Reply #50 on: November 30, 2008, 06:35:11 pm »

I did pick up a 20-lb turkey yesterday for a very good price. They needed to make room for the Christmas hams! So, thanks for your recipe, Della!! What do Europeans do when you get a craving for turkey? Do you eat pheasant or sage grouse, perhaps?

Now, we need some side dish recipes here. Common knowledge is that Thanksgiving is all about turkey. Wrong! It’s really all about those super side dishes, as my mother-in-law demonstrated at one of her Thanksgiving feasts. She had so many side dishes that she had to set up a special table to accommodate serving them.

Sweet and sour onions lead the list. These are always a hit, and we rarely go to the trouble of serving them any other time (although with frozen and canned baby onions available now, I may do this more often).
 
Brussels sprouts are often on the table, because they are my daughter’s favorite vegetable. I boil them briefly and then sauté them in olive oil with a splash of lemon juice at the end, often adding bacon bits.

This year I am serving an acorn squash that I will cut into rings, dunk in an egg/milk mixture and then into a cornmeal/ bread crumb mixture and bake in a hot oven for 30 minutes, drizzling with butter.

There really should be some kind of celery to provide a satisfying crunch, but if you have appetizers or stuffing containing celery, then you can omit this dish.

Most people have sweet potatoes at Thanksgiving. I occasionally cook them, but often find that the potatoes interfere with the pumpkin dishes, which must be given precedence. I abstain from adding marshmallows or maraschino cherries. Instead, I simply add equal parts butter and maple syrup to mashed sweet potatoes and season with salt and pepper.

Same with the green beans. I’ve found that the standard green bean with fried onion ring topping is rarely missed. In my book, green beans are at their best in the summer, when I put them into a nice Nicoise salad.

Cabbage usually finds its way onto the side dish table. I like to make a coleslaw or braised red cabbage with apple, bacon, and maple syrup. Who could resist that? A lighter alternative to coleslaw is a barley and cabbage salad. If you’re looking for something really special to dress up your cabbage, may I suggest cabbage with blueberries, which is as easy to make as it is spectacular looking and tasting. This dish also contains mushrooms, if you’re looking for a way to work mushrooms into the menu.

Other elegant vegetable dishes can be made from carrots, zucchini, beets, cucumbers in yogurt, asparagus, fennel, and leeks.

Let me know if you'd like any recipes!
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« Reply #51 on: November 30, 2008, 09:21:38 pm »


Thanks for the ideas on the acorn squash and brussel sprouts.  I'd been wondering how to eat them.  Now I can try your way.  Smiley
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« Reply #52 on: December 01, 2008, 01:59:43 pm »

I did pick up a 20-lb turkey yesterday for a very good price. They needed to make room for the Christmas hams! So, thanks for your recipe, Della!! What do Europeans do when you get a craving for turkey? Do you eat pheasant or sage grouse, perhaps?

Now, we need some side dish recipes here. Common knowledge is that Thanksgiving is all about turkey. Wrong! It’s really all about those super side dishes, as my mother-in-law demonstrated at one of her Thanksgiving feasts. She had so many side dishes that she had to set up a special table to accommodate serving them.

Sweet and sour onions lead the list. These are always a hit, and we rarely go to the trouble of serving them any other time (although with frozen and canned baby onions available now, I may do this more often).
 
Brussels sprouts are often on the table, because they are my daughter’s favorite vegetable. I boil them briefly and then sauté them in olive oil with a splash of lemon juice at the end, often adding bacon bits.

This year I am serving an acorn squash that I will cut into rings, dunk in an egg/milk mixture and then into a cornmeal/ bread crumb mixture and bake in a hot oven for 30 minutes, drizzling with butter.

There really should be some kind of celery to provide a satisfying crunch, but if you have appetizers or stuffing containing celery, then you can omit this dish.

Most people have sweet potatoes at Thanksgiving. I occasionally cook them, but often find that the potatoes interfere with the pumpkin dishes, which must be given precedence. I abstain from adding marshmallows or maraschino cherries. Instead, I simply add equal parts butter and maple syrup to mashed sweet potatoes and season with salt and pepper.

Same with the green beans. I’ve found that the standard green bean with fried onion ring topping is rarely missed. In my book, green beans are at their best in the summer, when I put them into a nice Nicoise salad.

Cabbage usually finds its way onto the side dish table. I like to make a coleslaw or braised red cabbage with apple, bacon, and maple syrup. Who could resist that? A lighter alternative to coleslaw is a barley and cabbage salad. If you’re looking for something really special to dress up your cabbage, may I suggest cabbage with blueberries, which is as easy to make as it is spectacular looking and tasting. This dish also contains mushrooms, if you’re looking for a way to work mushrooms into the menu.

Other elegant vegetable dishes can be made from carrots, zucchini, beets, cucumbers in yogurt, asparagus, fennel, and leeks.

Let me know if you'd like any recipes!


Well, if we want to eat turkey, we just go and buy one! LOL

I only prepared a turkey Christmas dinner once.(we always spend Christmas at my in-laws, so I'm not cooking that day) I got one at a butcher who specializes in poultry and game. It came completely prepared and stuffed, the bones were already removed. The bird was a bit flatter than normal because of that but I found it very convenient.  That was very easy, all I had to do was add knobs of butter on top and put it in the oven. And it was delicious.

I can't remember what side dishes we had but I'm sure sauteed Belgian endives and Brussels sprouts were on the menu. I also boil the sprouts and saute them in good butter, and season with salt, black pepper and a bit of nutmeg. I should try your version with the lemon Lee, it sounds very good.
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« Reply #53 on: December 02, 2008, 02:56:37 am »

Lee, those do sound good!
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« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2008, 10:56:16 am »

I did pick up a 20-lb turkey yesterday for a very good price. They needed to make room for the Christmas hams! So, thanks for your recipe, Della!! What do Europeans do when you get a craving for turkey? Do you eat pheasant or sage grouse, perhaps?

Someone needed to revive this holiday recipes thread -- the recipes are still great!

For a long time, I didn't think I liked goose or duck -- both birds seemed to be 10% meat and 90% grease. But when I worked at the museum and started using a reflector oven, I discovered that people don't know how to cook this kind of fatty poultry anymore (not people in the US anyway).  What I'd previously eaten had been cooked like turkey: roasted flat in a covered roasting pan, which doesn't work very well as the fat gets soaked back into the meat.

A rotisserie-type arrangement is best for goose or duck, as the fat drips down into a pan. But if you don't have one, a roasting pan will do; the bird just has to be off the bottom of the pan so it can be put up on one of those cooling racks for cakes. Just use a baster to siphon off the grease if there's enough of it to reach the bird.  It's also helpful to prick the skin with a fork in several places before roasting. 
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« Reply #55 on: December 10, 2008, 11:01:35 am »

No Brokie holiday can be complete without some variation on cherry cake!  This is a coffeecake recipe with a dense poundcake-like texture.  I developed it when I was trying to use up a batch of cherry jam that refused to jell completely.


Cherry Coffee Cake


1 (18 oz) box white cake mix
4 Tbsp vegetable oil
1 cup water
3 egg whites
1 small pkg vanilla instant pudding mix
1/2 tsp almond extract
one pint cherry jam

Grease a 9x13" pan, angel food cake tube pan or Bundt pan (a deep, fluted style of cake pan)

Put jam in a saucepan with about 3 tablespoons water.  Heat slowly, stirring occasionally, till liquid; put aside.

Mix together the other ingredients, beat at high speed for 3 minutes. 

Put about one-fourth of the batter into the greased pan; spoon over some of the cherry mixture.  Add the rest of the batter in three parts, adding the cherry mixture between layers; draw a knife through the batter in short, curved strokes to “swirl” the colors.  End with the rest of the batter on top, reserving the rest of the juice from the cherry mixture.  Bake at  350 degrees for 55-60 minutes for Bundt or tube pan; 40 minutes for sheet cake pan.  Check every 20 minutes.  Cool thoroughly; top with cherry glaze if desired.

Cherry glaze:  Mix the reserved syrup with 1/2 cup powdered sugar and 1/2 teaspoon almond extract.  Beat by hand, adding liquid or powdered sugar until you get a consistency that’s thick but not as stiff as frosting.  Spoon over cooled cake; spread down sides with knife if using a tube or Bundt pan. 

You can make a chocolate variation just by substituting chocolate cake mix and pudding; use whole eggs instead of just egg whites.  Or for an extra-colorful coffee cake, try one of those cherry cake mixes.

(this recipe is also posted over at the Cherry Cake thread)
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« Reply #56 on: December 10, 2008, 12:47:26 pm »

Wow, that sounds good, Marcia!  And not too difficult.  I may give it a try.  Cool
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« Reply #57 on: December 10, 2008, 02:24:12 pm »

This is a good dish for a brunch, though you might want to call it something else in some localities.   Wink  It's a fairly low-maintenance recipe despite the 1-3 hour cooking time: can be started first thing in the morning, with just an occasional check-and-stir to make sure it hasn't scorched or cooked down too much.

Cheese grits


3 cups water
3/4 cup uncooked grits
(NOT INSTANT)
1/4 tsp salt
2 beaten eggs
4-6 ounces grated Cheddar cheese
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/2 tsp garlic powder


Boil the water; stir in the grits and salt.  Lower the temperature and simmer for 1 to 3 hours, stirring occasionally, until thick and “buttery”.

Add a small amount of the grits to the beaten egg; mix, and return to the pan; add the cheese, butter or margarine and garlic powder.  Mix well until the cheese is thoroughly melted, taking care not to scorch.

Bake in a greased baking dish at 350º, 30-40 minutes.
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« Reply #58 on: December 12, 2008, 03:41:58 am »

This is a good dish for a brunch, though you might want to call it something else in some localities.   Wink  It's a fairly low-maintenance recipe despite the 1-3 hour cooking time: can be started first thing in the morning, with just an occasional check-and-stir to make sure it hasn't scorched or cooked down too much.

Cheese grits


3 cups water
3/4 cup uncooked grits
(NOT INSTANT)
1/4 tsp salt
2 beaten eggs
4-6 ounces grated Cheddar cheese
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/2 tsp garlic powder


Boil the water; stir in the grits and salt.  Lower the temperature and simmer for 1 to 3 hours, stirring occasionally, until thick and “buttery”.

Add a small amount of the grits to the beaten egg; mix, and return to the pan; add the cheese, butter or margarine and garlic powder.  Mix well until the cheese is thoroughly melted, taking care not to scorch.

Bake in a greased baking dish at 350º, 30-40 minutes.



Polenta al formaggio!  Smiley  it sounds delish!
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« Reply #59 on: December 12, 2008, 01:08:13 pm »

This is a good dish for a brunch, though you might want to call it something else in some localities.   Wink  It's a fairly low-maintenance recipe despite the 1-3 hour cooking time: can be started first thing in the morning, with just an occasional check-and-stir to make sure it hasn't scorched or cooked down too much.

Cheese grits


3 cups water
3/4 cup uncooked grits
(NOT INSTANT)
1/4 tsp salt
2 beaten eggs
4-6 ounces grated Cheddar cheese
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
1/2 tsp garlic powder


Boil the water; stir in the grits and salt.  Lower the temperature and simmer for 1 to 3 hours, stirring occasionally, until thick and “buttery”.

Add a small amount of the grits to the beaten egg; mix, and return to the pan; add the cheese, butter or margarine and garlic powder.  Mix well until the cheese is thoroughly melted, taking care not to scorch.

Bake in a greased baking dish at 350º, 30-40 minutes.


OMG, I love cheese grits!  Cheesy
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« Reply #60 on: December 21, 2008, 12:30:04 pm »

MOVED to http://bettermost.net/forum/index.php/topic,6108.msg301939.html#msg301939 at Recipes -- Cookies, Pies, Cakes and Other Sweets
by Marge_Innavera
« Last Edit: December 23, 2008, 09:58:54 pm by Marge_Innavera » Logged
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« Reply #61 on: December 21, 2008, 01:40:54 pm »

That recipe sounds great, Marcia.
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« Reply #62 on: December 21, 2008, 04:37:57 pm »

You posted that recipe in the cookie thread last year, Marcia, but I say it bears repeating! Thank you!!

Here is an unusual salad that I am planning to serve for Christmas dinner. My family likes beets this way much better than the Harvard Beets sweet-sour recipe. It is a Provencal recipe taught at the cooking school of Nathalie Wang at La Sara.

Raw Beet Salad La Sara

4 beets (about 1 1/2 lbs, stems discarded)
2/3 cup creme fraiche
2 T. fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp. salt or to taste
2 T. chopped dried apricots

Peel the beets and grate them into a serving bowl (be sure to wear an apron for this step). Add the creme fraiche, the lemon juice, and the salt, stirring until the mixture is combined well, and sprinkle the apricots over.

You can substitute plain yogurt for the creme fraiche.
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« Reply #63 on: December 21, 2008, 04:43:17 pm »

Lee, what is creme fraiche? I like beets although I understand many people don't. I never used to eat them on school lunches though. They have an unusual, but good taste in my opinion. Beet greens are good too.
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« Reply #64 on: December 21, 2008, 04:45:36 pm »

May I repeat:

        Since you do not go to my threads on recipes nor origins of words or First Nations,
as I had no time to add such lately with death in family,
maybe some of you heard that cranberries is an First Nation food called atoka ?

Atoka Ice Cream
1 oz atoka juice
2 tbs sweet or not sweet dried cranberries (maybe whole fresh ones as I never tried that?)
3 cups 1/3 soft vanilla ice cream

Combine. Store to freeze until set.
Serve as cones or in bowl(s)

Me dire vos résultats (tell me your results) ??

Au revoir,
hugs!               
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« Reply #65 on: December 21, 2008, 04:55:20 pm »

Artiste, this looks like a lovely recipe. It would also be very appropos for Thanksgiving! I'm not sure when I'll try it, since it is very cold out today and I don't feel like eating ice cream!!

Jack, creme fraiche is like yogurt...it's a fermented cream that is on the way to cheese. In England, this is called clotted cream. It is a little like cottage cheese but smooth, not curdy, or salty. You can get it at Whole Foods or any high-end grocery store.

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« Reply #66 on: December 21, 2008, 05:17:06 pm »

Merci Front-Ranger!

Then eat those attoka raw ?

Even, bring some dried one son your mountain aventures?

Good any time of the day? Snack!

No matter what age! School too!

How does cranberry juice help prevent urinary tract infections? It acidifies the urine, contains an antibacterial agent called hippuric acid, and also contains other compounds that reduce the ability of E. coli bacteria to adhere to the walls of the urinary tract. Before an infection can start, a pathogen must first latch on to and then penetrate the mucosal surface of the urinary tract walls, but cranberries prevent such adherence, so the E. coli is washed away in the urine and voided. Since E. coli is pathogen responsible for 80-90% of urinary tract infections, the protection afforded by cranberries is quite significant.
And you want to know more?

Maman et ma soeur, they give such the dogs attaks for urine infection; good for such for humans too!

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« Reply #67 on: December 21, 2008, 08:39:45 pm »

Great information, friend! One time I visited a cranberry bog and it was fascinating to see the berries being harvested. I actually love recipes with raw cranberries even better than the cooked ones. For Christmas morning, I'm gonna make cranberry cheese muffins with raw berries and sharp cheddar cheese!!
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« Reply #68 on: December 21, 2008, 11:23:13 pm »

For Christmas morning, I'm gonna make cranberry cheese muffins with raw berries and sharp cheddar cheese!!

That sounds yummo. I'll probably have oatmeal. ...  Undecided
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« Reply #69 on: December 21, 2008, 11:47:27 pm »



Peel the beets and grate them into a serving bowl (be sure to wear an apron for this step). Add the creme fraiche, the lemon juice, and the salt, stirring until the mixture is combined well, and sprinkle the apricots over.




Why doesn't the lemon juice curdle the crème fraîche?


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« Reply #70 on: December 22, 2008, 09:50:26 am »


Why doesn't the lemon juice curdle the crème fraîche?

I think because it's essentially already curdled.  I think of it more like sour cream than yogurt.
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« Reply #71 on: December 22, 2008, 05:57:47 pm »

I think because it's essentially already curdled.  I think of it more like sour cream than yogurt.

Thanks Paul.  I guess I always thought creme fraiche (too lazy to go Google and get the accents) was more like whipped cream.
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« Reply #72 on: December 22, 2008, 06:08:51 pm »

Thanks Paul.  I guess I always thought creme fraiche (too lazy to go Google and get the accents) was more like whipped cream.

It's fermented, and actually thicker than our sour cream.
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« Reply #73 on: December 23, 2008, 10:00:42 pm »

You posted that recipe in the cookie thread last year, Marcia, but I say it bears repeating! Thank you!!

I also had a Senior Moment and posted it in the Recipes and Side Dishes thread.   Smiley  I've edited that post to a link to the recipe in the Desserts thread.

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« Reply #74 on: November 26, 2010, 01:44:37 pm »

I was perusing the Main and Sides thread and rediscovered the forgotten Comic Crispybread interlude in the middle!! A sideshow in the middle of the main event, so to speak!! And once again, John, happy birthday, you funny man!!

Excellent recipe, but I found it tedious to prepare.  I do have a toaster so a blowtorch wasn't needed, but I misread your instructions and buttered the toaster instead of the bread.  My second attempt didn't work out either, as I attempted to toast the butter, and then spread the bread on that.  Very unsatisfactory.  Phillip helped me with the third attempt where I held a piece of toasted bread, he held a knife with butter on it, and we ran towards each other.  That worked, and the scars should be healing soon.

But what I found worked best for me was not pretending I could cook and simply buying this in the grocery store.  I found that Kraft Foods now offers "K.C. McToasties."  It's pre-toasted and pre-buttered bread that you simply put in the microwave.  It's good, but I wish it came in more varieties.  They only have "Light" and "Dark  Their web site says "Medium" is also available, but only in select stores on the West coast.  I guess they're test marketing it now.
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« Reply #75 on: November 26, 2010, 04:03:36 pm »

I heard a great idea on NPR for dressing.  Of course, there's never enough stuffing, so you have to cook some extra outside the turkey.  But, how to get that turkey-juices flavor?

Chris Kimball from America's Test Kitchen suggested this:  cut the wings off the turkey, sauté in a little butter, and place on top of the dressing in a 9x13 glass dish, cover tightly with foil.  Voilà.  Easy turkey flavor. 
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« Reply #76 on: December 22, 2010, 04:41:37 pm »

This was published in last week's Parade as one of author Dean Koontz' favorite recipes, and it's already making the rounds.

Best Baked Corn

1 cup milk
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons flour
1 (15 ounce) can corn, drained
2 eggs, well beaten

Metric measurements:

237 ml milk
30 ml butter
15 ml sugar
30 ml flour
425 (grams? ? ) can corn, drained
2 eggs, well beaten


1 Boil 3/4 cup milk with butter and sugar.

2 Dissolve flour in 1/4 cup milk.

3 Pour flour mixture into milk mixture to make think white sauce.

4 Add to drained corn in a 1 -1.5 quart loaf pan.

5 Mix in eggs.

6 Bake 1 hour @ 400.
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« Reply #77 on: December 22, 2010, 04:44:37 pm »

I love baked corn!  Cheesy
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« Reply #78 on: December 24, 2010, 03:56:18 pm »

I kept that recipe too, Marge and Jeff! Here's a side dish I just finished mixing up:

Semolina Pesto Cakes

3 cups milk
generous 1 cup semolina
3 T. pesto
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, chopped
1/4 cup butter
1 cup grated Pecorino or Parmesan cheese
2 eggs, beaten
freshly grated nutmeg
salt and pepper
tomato sauce, to serve
basil sprigs

Heat the milk until it is ready to start boiling and stir in the semolina until the mixture is smooth and thick. Lower the heat and simmer for 2 minutes, stirring, until the paste starts to come away from the side of the pan.

Remove from heat and stir in the pesto, tomatoes, half of the butter, and half of the cheese. Add the beaten eggs, nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Spoon into a large shallow dish to a depth of 1/4 inch, level the surface, let cool, and then chill.

Heat the oven to 375 degrees or medium-hot. Grease a shallow baking dish. Using a 1 1/2 inch cookie cutter or overturned glass, cut out rounds from the semolina paste. Arrange in overlapping circles on the greased dish. Melt the remaining butter, brushing it over the rounds, and sprinkle with more cheese. Bake for 30 to  40 minutes until golden. Garnish with basil and serve with tomato sauce. (You could also serve with mushroom sauce)
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« Reply #79 on: November 17, 2011, 09:55:00 pm »

I'm just about to make my first side dish for Thanksgiving, sweet and sour onions!
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« Reply #80 on: December 23, 2013, 12:26:07 pm »

I've obtained a lovely leg of lamb for Christmas dinner and I'm about to marinate it. Any hints on a good flavorful marinade? In past years I haven't been able to taste all the garlic and rosemary I've heaped on the lamb, no matter how I've prepared it!
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« Reply #81 on: December 23, 2013, 01:22:11 pm »

I've had this problem too.  It can't just "sit" on the outside; try cutting little slits into the meat and inserting the rosemary and garlic.  Or, try crushing/chopping it very finely and shmear it on the lamb after a good rubbing with olive oil. 

I do a rack of lamb for xmess--I make a crust that consists of dijon mustard, freshly ground black pepper, lots of garlic, rosemary, and crushed juniper berries.  I crush the whole shebang in a mortar and shmear it on, covering it with breadcrumbs.  Then roast in a very hot oven for 30 minutes.  The house smells divine!
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« Reply #82 on: December 23, 2013, 02:05:28 pm »

Thanks for the advice, it was just what I needed...I'm off to find my mortar and pestle!
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« Reply #83 on: December 23, 2013, 03:08:00 pm »

On to next challenge...my mom can't eat roasted brussels sprouts, she needs to have them cooked longer. Anybody have a favorite well cooked brussels sprout recipe?

Here's the sprouts as I obtained them yesterday. They'll be quite fresh!
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« Reply #84 on: December 23, 2013, 05:08:16 pm »

I love brussel sprouts.

I cook them very simple (like I tend to do with most food)

Cover them in water and bring them to boil. Then pour the water out and pour fresh water in the pot. This time about halfway up. Bring them to boil again, and let boil for as long as needed.

By pouring the first water out you get rid of the little bitterness that can sometimes be in brussel sprouts.
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« Reply #85 on: December 23, 2013, 08:54:06 pm »

Thanks very much for the tip, Sonja. Makes perfect sense.
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« Reply #86 on: December 25, 2013, 09:55:11 am »

Good luck with them, Lee!
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« Reply #87 on: December 25, 2013, 12:29:35 pm »

Thanks, friend! I need all the luck I can get!

I was taking the lamb out of the fridge this morning when I knocked the door shelf with my elbow and it fell on the tile floor. There was an amazing array of pickles, hot oil, chili sauce, capers, and Worcestershire all over the floor. The good news is that I now have to stay out of my kitchen while the freshly mopped floor is drying, I'm eating a nice breakfast and catching up on BetterMost, and I am rid of all those miscellaneous jars and bottles that were cluttering up the fridge! Merry Christmas, everyone!
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« Reply #88 on: December 25, 2013, 12:30:19 pm »

It was a condiment-astrophe!
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« Reply #89 on: December 25, 2013, 01:39:14 pm »

It was a condiment-astrophe!

 laugh


Sorry you had to deal with all that mess, Lee.
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« Reply #90 on: December 25, 2013, 02:47:24 pm »

Oy, not a good start for Christmas Day (or any day for that matter).
I hope your day improves and today evening you'll fall into your bed tired, but happy. Kiss
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« Reply #91 on: December 25, 2013, 09:04:31 pm »

Thanks friends. It was really not a big deal at all. Christmas is completed, very happy and peaceful. My grandsons loved their presents and the time spent together...does anything else really matter? I prepared the brussels' sprouts just as you advised, very simply with some butter, salt and pepper, and a splash of lemon juice. They were a big hit. I prepared the lamb to 145 degrees and it was perfect. The mashed potatoes were a challenge. When I began whipping them with milk and butter, they were lumpy. I realized that they weren't cooked enough all the way through. So I put them in the microwave for 15 minutes and tried whipping them again. Still lumpy.  I put them in the microwave for 10 more minutes and tried whipping them again. Still lumpy.  I put them in the microwave for 10 more minutes and tried whipping them again. Still lumpy. I then realized that no matter how long I microwaved them they were just not going to cooperate. So, I put my mom's serving through a colander and then the rest of us ate the lumpy mashed potatoes. They tasted fine!

While I was making the gravy I told everyone the funny story about how my in-laws always made gravy. My mother-in-law would be stirring the roux and would instruct her husband to pour in the stock very evenly. Then she would say "pour faster!" and then "pour slower!" and she would stir furiously. The gravy was usually just fine. While I was telling the story, I was stirring with my right hand and pouring the stock with my left hand. I made the gravy and tipped up the pan to show my daughter how it had magically turned into perfect gravy. My husband looked on absently and sipped his wine.  Undecided
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« Reply #92 on: December 25, 2013, 10:21:10 pm »

The lamb is flamed! (Altho no one in the picture seems to look very happy about it. They probably thought the house was about to go up in flames. Oh ye of little faith!)
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« Reply #93 on: December 26, 2013, 09:17:37 am »

made a buffalo chicken dip that was super easy, and everyone loved it.

Chicken breasts
olive oil
water
8 oz package of cream cheese (room temperature)
half cup of hot sauce
shredded cheese

Get one pan and put just enough olive oil to cover the bottom of the pan, and add one cup of water.  Cook the chicken breast in this.

Once the breasts are cool enough to handle, shred them up, enough for two cups worth.

In a mixing bowl mix the cream cheese and hot sauce.  Once smooth, mix in the chicken and some of the shredded cheese.  Pour into a bowl and cover with more shredded cheese, and put in the oven at 300 degrees until the cheese is melted on top.

I used a cassarole pan to bake it, so I doubled the amount of everything, it was still great.

Serve with chips, pita bread, veggies, or other items.
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« Reply #94 on: December 26, 2013, 02:21:21 pm »

That sounds good Chuck. What kind of hot sauce did you use?
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« Reply #95 on: December 26, 2013, 03:14:31 pm »

Frank's Red Hot
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« Reply #96 on: December 26, 2013, 06:05:07 pm »

Everything sounds delicious!

I'm glad my sprouty advice was of help to you, Lee.

Next time, I'll try a little lemon on them, that's new to me.
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« Reply #97 on: November 26, 2014, 08:21:01 pm »

I heard a great idea on NPR for dressing.  Of course, there's never enough stuffing, so you have to cook some extra outside the turkey.  But, how to get that turkey-juices flavor?

Chris Kimball from America's Test Kitchen suggested this:  cut the wings off the turkey, sauté in a little butter, and place on top of the dressing in a 9x13 glass dish, cover tightly with foil.  Voilà.  Easy turkey flavor. 

Saw this tip just in time! Thank you, Paul!
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« Reply #98 on: November 26, 2014, 09:01:08 pm »

On the radio this morning they were discussing what does and doesn't belong on a Thanksgiving table.

There were people who felt that Thanksgiving meals should be 'traditional' with turkey, potatoes, stuffing, rolls, and so forth.

Then there those who called and said that there should also be room for the foods you make all the time and love, like arroz con gandules, chicken parm, baked ham, and other dishes.

As an Italian, I have to say that there is always pasta and meatballs on our table.
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« Reply #99 on: November 26, 2014, 11:09:44 pm »

There seem to be quite a few people for whom macaroni and cheese is a traditional Thanksgiving dinner element.
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« Reply #100 on: November 28, 2014, 04:54:43 pm »

There seem to be quite a few people for whom macaroni and cheese is a traditional Thanksgiving dinner element.

According to this site, mac and cheese is the third most popular side dish for Thanksgiving!

Here are a couple of the many charts with circles and arrows that deconstruct the Thanksgiving plate in great detail! I agree that mashed potatoes is way up there in popularity, but I don't think it's THAT easy to make. There are things that can go wrong and the way I make it, it takes a couple of hours! Stuffing is difficult to get right too, I believe.
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« Reply #101 on: November 28, 2014, 09:27:34 pm »

Hmmm.....I've never seen mac and cheese on any thanksgiving table.  I'm also surprised to see Brussels sprouts so high up on the chart.
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« Reply #102 on: November 28, 2014, 09:54:34 pm »

Hmmm.....I've never seen mac and cheese on any thanksgiving table.

It was on the White House table this year.

I never heard of it, either, until one Thanksgiving many years ago, I saw some sports reporter on local TV news ask members of the Philadelphia Eagles football team what they were looking forward to eating at Thanksgiving--or something like that--and they all said, "Macaroni and cheese."

I agree that mashed potatoes is way up there in popularity, but I don't think it's THAT easy to make. There are things that can go wrong and the way I make it, it takes a couple of hours!

Mashed potatoes difficult? A couple of hours to make 'em?  Huh?
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« Reply #103 on: November 28, 2014, 11:31:26 pm »

Mashed potatoes difficult? A couple of hours to make 'em?  Huh?

WTF?  Mashed potatoes should take only about 20 minutes tops.  Boil the potatoes, skin on, if you like.  I like Yukon Golds.  Boil them with a clove of garlic, and it comes out mellow and subtle.  Mash away with a masher of your choice.  Add lots of butter, add hot milk and whisk away.  Done.
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« Reply #104 on: November 29, 2014, 11:35:36 am »

I clocked it this year. I boil the potatoes in their "jackets" from a cold water start. When they're tender, I let them cool in a strainer in the sink. I save the potato water for soup or my plants. When they're cool I peel them and put them in a bowl in the fridge. The next day I mash them with butter and milk and add salt and pepper to taste. I then heat them up again in a pan. The whole process takes a couple of hours! You left out the cooling, peeling, and taste testing while adding milk, butter, salt and pepper!
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« Reply #105 on: November 29, 2014, 01:37:53 pm »

WTF?  Mashed potatoes should take only about 20 minutes tops.  Boil the potatoes, skin on, if you like.  I like Yukon Golds.  Boil them with a clove of garlic, and it comes out mellow and subtle.  Mash away with a masher of your choice.  Add lots of butter, add hot milk and whisk away.  Done.

Well, that's what I was thinking, but I didn't have the balls to go into the details.

I like Yukon Golds, too.

When I was a kid, mashing the potatoes was always my dad's job, for some reason. When I had to furnish my first apartment, for graduate school, I made sure my mother got me a really good potato masher, as close to the one she had as possible.  Smiley

I clocked it this year. I boil the potatoes in their "jackets" from a cold water start. When they're tender, I let them cool in a strainer in the sink. I save the potato water for soup or my plants. When they're cool I peel them and put them in a bowl in the fridge. The next day I mash them with butter and milk and add salt and pepper to taste. I then heat them up again in a pan. The whole process takes a couple of hours! You left out the cooling, peeling, and taste testing while adding milk, butter, salt and pepper!

I'm sure the outcome is quite delicious, but I'm afraid that still sounds like an awful lot of fuss for mashed potatoes, one of the easiest, simplest comfort foods around.

Incidentally, my mother always used to add water from boiling the potatoes to the pan drippings to make gravy. That always made really good gravy.
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« Reply #106 on: November 29, 2014, 02:44:46 pm »

Cooling?  Whatever for?  I just drain them and mash them while they're still hot.  Skin on.

Jeff, I'll bet the potato water has a bit of starch, which probably helps to thicken a gravy.  Nice idea. 
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« Reply #107 on: November 29, 2014, 04:25:47 pm »

Cooling?  Whatever for?  I just drain them and mash them while they're still hot.  Skin on.

Yeah. I've heard of cooling cookie dough in the refrigerator over night before baking, but this is the first I've heard of doing it to potatoes for mashing.

Quote
Jeff, I'll bet the potato water has a bit of starch, which probably helps to thicken a gravy.  Nice idea.  

Yup, I'm sure it's starch from the potatoes. Mother may even have said as much; I don't remember for sure. I do remember that she said she learned to do that from my grandmother/her mother, and it wouldn't surprise me at all if Grandma learned it from my great-grandmother/her mother. They were all basically rural women, and that's how cooking was learned, from mother to daughter.

Mother and Grandma also always included a small piece of pork when they made a roast of beef. They said the mixed beef and pork drippings made a better tasting gravy.

I've never made mashed potatoes with the skins on, but, here again, I'm cooking like the women before me!  laugh  They never had fancy potatoes like Yukon Gold, just whatever regular old potatoes with thick skins that had to be peeled for cooking.
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« Reply #108 on: December 13, 2014, 08:34:40 pm »

I cook the potatoes "in their jackets" because the skins and next to the skin is where most of the nutrients are. Then, I have to cool them before peeling because, well, ouch!
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« Reply #109 on: December 14, 2014, 12:05:37 am »

yeah, burns are no fun!
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« Reply #110 on: December 26, 2014, 11:12:41 am »

My leg of lamb came out beautifully yesterday. I obtained it from a specialty meat shop and it was 11 pounds...the whole leg as well as the thigh. The butcher explained to me that the "leg of lamb" you buy in grocery stores is really only the thigh and they sell the "shanks" separately. This thing was as long as my refrigerator is wide! I brined it in a cooler for about 18 hours and then rinsed and dried it and stored it in the fridge overnight. Early on Christmas morning I oiled it with olive oil and stuck the slivers of garlic and rosemary in slits cut in the meat in a diamond pattern. I put it in a 325 degree F oven for about 1 1/2 hours until the meat thermometer registered 145 degrees. After taking it out of the oven, I let it rest for 10 minutes before carving. The meat was slightly pink near the bone and medium at the ends, well cooked but still tender. Even my toothless mother could eat it! And, I have plenty of leftovers and am making shepherd's pie for my friends!
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« Reply #111 on: December 26, 2014, 02:33:04 pm »

My meatballs turned out great, everyone raved about them.

I used to use my mom's recipe, but I decided to change some things up and see how it would go.

Instead of ground beef, I used a mix of beef, pork and veal.  For each pound of meat you add: 

1/2 cup Progresso™ Italian-style bread crumbs
1/4 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 egg
A few shakes of Italian Seasoning.

Heat oven to 400°F.  Line 13x9-inch pan with foil; spray with cooking spray.   In large bowl, mix all ingredients. Shape mixture into 20 to 24 (1 1/2-inch) meatballs.  Place 1 inch apart in pan.   Bake uncovered 18 to 22 minutes or until no longer pink in center.
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« Reply #112 on: December 28, 2014, 11:03:30 pm »

Friend Chuck, that is a very authentically Italian way to prepare meatballs. No wonder everyone raved!

Review of my Christmas dinner...it was, in one word, successful! There wasn't a single dish that I wouldn't rate either very good or outstanding! I was so pleased!! First, to talk about the main event, the leg of lamb was magnificent. Instead of buying it at a supermarket, I went to a meat store. Now that I live in a cosmopolitan area of Denver, it's easy to go to specialty stores. I first selected what I thought was leg of lamb from the freezer and brought it to the counter. The people there informed me that I was not buying leg of lamb, but lamb shanks instead. They showed me the one leg of lamb that they had and it seemed huge. It was 11 pounds of meat. I looked at it, took a big breath and said "I'll take it" even though I didn't think it would fit in my refrigerator or oven. But it was such a magnificent piece of meat that I couldn't resist!

I got the LOL home, all protected in its plastic wrapper, and it just barely fit across the lower shelf of my fridge. On Tuesday evening, I plopped it in a salt brine in a cooler and put it outside where it was just below freezing overnight. Then, late on Wednesday (Christmas eve) I rinsed off the LOL and put it back in the fridge to air dry. On Christmas morning, I rubbed olive oil over it and stuck it with slits in which I placed slivers of garlic and dried rosemary. I placed it in a 325 degree oven in late morning and by 1 pm it had achieved 145 degrees Fahrenheit. I took it out of the oven and let it rest for 10 minutes. Then, I warmed a ladle full of Pernod over a gas flame, dipped the ladle to set the liqueur on fire, and poured it over the LOL. The rosemary popped and exuded its fragrance while the flame danced. I then carved and served the lamb with horseradish and mint jelly. The gravy came later....
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« Reply #113 on: December 28, 2014, 11:21:48 pm »

But it was such a magnificent piece of meat that I couldn't resist!

A line spoken by many a gay man "the morning after."  Grin
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« Reply #114 on: December 29, 2014, 03:33:43 pm »

laugh

that's just wrong, Jeff! 


back to food, I was at an 'after-Christmas' party on Saturday that two of my bowling friends hosted.  I never saw so much food.  Granted, with the amount of people it was warrented, but damn!

appetizers included meat patties in puff pastry, cocktail franks, buffalo chicken dip, assorted chips and veggies and dips.

then the table was cleared, and the main dishes came out.  Fresh baked ham, fresh baked roast beef, a chicken dish.  Roasted pork with rosemary, gourmet Mac & Cheese, baked ziti, Shrimp scampi.

clear that away, and make way for the desserts!  three different types of cakes, christmas cookies, chocolate raspberry torte.
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« Reply #115 on: November 23, 2015, 02:41:53 pm »

One thing that's constant about cooking the holiday meat is that it always takes longer to prepare than you think it will. Yesterday I obtained the Thanksgiving turkey, a fresh, organic bird. Today I was going to start to brine it but it is still a little icy inside. So, I've got it in a pan of cool water in the sink.

The meat store guy said they keep the turkeys at exactly 32 degrees.
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« Reply #116 on: November 23, 2015, 08:30:39 pm »

Okay, time to tackle that turkey!! What are you doing to prepare for the holiday?
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« Reply #117 on: November 24, 2015, 04:37:24 pm »

my family doesn't eat a lot of turkey, so I'm sure my mom will do the usual.  A turkey breast to say we had turky (lol) and then the rest Italian.
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« Reply #118 on: December 21, 2016, 08:55:56 pm »

I was planning to cook a simple corned beef this year, but my daughter just emailed me to say she had a lamb roast available!
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« Reply #119 on: December 27, 2016, 11:20:31 am »

Christmas ended up a catered affair, so no need to make any main or sides.

Tonight is a bowling party at the lanes, and I'm making buffalo chicken dip.
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« Reply #120 on: April 13, 2017, 01:24:29 pm »

My friend EDelMar bought a huge bag of rice and wants a seasoning mix to stir into the rice while it's cooking. I checked around and couldn't find anything suitable, so I'm trying to whip up something for him. I'm starting with minced dried onion, chicken boullion granuales and minced dried veggies, which includes carrots, parsley, celery, peppers, tomatoes, and garlic. What else should I put in it?
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« Reply #121 on: April 13, 2017, 02:36:56 pm »

My friend EDelMar bought a huge bag of rice and wants a seasoning mix to stir into the rice while it's cooking. I checked around and couldn't find anything suitable, so I'm trying to whip up something for him. I'm starting with minced dried onion, chicken boullion granuales and minced dried veggies, which includes carrots, parsley, celery, peppers, tomatoes, and garlic. What else should I put in it?

Beans?  Grin
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« Reply #122 on: April 13, 2017, 02:58:31 pm »

What else should I put in it?

How about biryani?

http://www.food.com/recipe/the-best-biryani-177830
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« Reply #123 on: April 13, 2017, 05:54:17 pm »

Wow, that is some recipe, friend Paul. I am dying to make it, just as soon as I find a source for goat meat!
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« Reply #124 on: November 18, 2017, 12:19:08 am »

Well, Thanksgiving is next  week, and I'm not  sure what to make for a side dish.

I know mom will say we don't need it, but I'll try to make one to bring anyway.
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« Reply #125 on: November 23, 2017, 12:18:36 pm »

Is it called Asparagus Rarebit because the asparagus is rare in it?

Asparagus Rarebit a la Molly Katzen/Moosewood

2 tbs butter or margarine
2 tbs flour
1 tsp dry mustard
1.5 cups beer or ale at room temperature (OK if flat)
1 cup packed grated cheddar (0.5 lb)
1 tsp prepared horseradish
1 medium clove garlic, minced
salt, black pepper, & cayenne to taste

1) Melt the butter in a medium-sized saucepan.  Sprinkle in the flour & dry mustard, whisking constantly.
2) Add the beer or ale and keep whisking as you bring it to a boil.  Lower the heat annd simmer for about 10 minutes, mixing frequently.
3) Add the remaining ingredients, and stir until the cheese melts.
4) Serve hot oveer steamed vegetables and/or cooked potatoes.
5) Garnish with chunks of ripe tomatoes, tart apples, and/or toasted walnuts.

I bet apples and walnuts would make it Thanksgiving-like.--Lynne
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« Reply #126 on: November 23, 2017, 02:42:31 pm »

I need to be at mom and dads in two hours, and the side dish is in the oven.


I decided to do something "non-Thanksgiving", but tasty.   I made "beef pockets"


Brown one pound of ground beef in a skillet,  season with a mix of salt, pepper, paprika, onion powder, garlic powder, and (if you like heat) ground red pepper.

Take one can of Pillsbury crescent  rolls, and unroll.  They are in pre-cut rectangles, then cut into triangles.  Ignore that.  LOL   cut the rectangles out, and then cut them in  half into squares.

Place some beef on each square, fold in half and close the edges, bake  in oven for 15 minutes at 300.

Smiley
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« Reply #127 on: November 23, 2017, 05:53:10 pm »

I don't know what Pillsbury crescent rolls are, but I'm guessing some sort of pastry.

Which means your dish is basically pirogi, more or less.

I'm sure it's good!
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« Reply #128 on: November 23, 2017, 10:52:22 pm »

I don't know what Pillsbury crescent rolls are, but I'm guessing some sort of pastry.

Which means your dish is basically pirogi, more or less.

I'm sure it's good!


They come in a tube and look like this.





You unroll the dough, and take the pre-cut triangles and roll them up again.  When they're done baking, they look like this.






What I did was ignore the triangle cuts,  and shaped the dough into squares.   I placed the seasoned meat onto them, and then folded them over and pinched the ends shut.   When they were done,  they looked like this.


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« Reply #129 on: November 24, 2017, 07:01:44 pm »

Yes, that's pretty much how I imagined it.

It's like pirogi, more or less.

How were they?
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« Reply #130 on: November 24, 2017, 10:37:44 pm »

They were good.  Smiley   I made 24 of them, and at the end of the meal, there were  only 3 left, and mom took them to have the next  day.

Smiley
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« Reply #131 on: November 25, 2017, 07:35:55 pm »

In the light of all the other food you had, that means they were really really good!  Cheesy
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« Reply #132 on: November 25, 2017, 07:56:49 pm »

Smiley
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« Reply #133 on: November 17, 2018, 02:16:52 pm »

Time for the yearly airing of this thread! I went through every single post and recipe and now I'm ready to start cooking!!

It's especially nice with the crispybread intermission!
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« Reply #134 on: November 17, 2018, 08:42:56 pm »

Oh yeah, time to bump this one up!
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Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!
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« Reply #135 on: November 21, 2018, 10:54:37 am »

They say you should try something new every year, so my new recipe is Asian Pear Slaw. It has rave reviews and I have an Asian Pear that R. gave me. They are crunchy like an apple.

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/asian-pear-slaw-104404
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« Reply #136 on: November 22, 2018, 11:37:32 am »

Turns out that I didn't have to make anything this year.

Mom and Dad told me that Michelle has everything taken care of, and mom and dad are bringing some Italian food as well, so everything for the meal is covered.

As for dessert, not only will we have traditional Thanksgiving desserts, we'll be celebrating Trent's 5th birthday as well, so we'll have birthday cake too.
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Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!
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« Reply #137 on: November 24, 2018, 05:08:42 pm »

Here is a photo of that Asian Pear Salad that was the new item on the menu this year. It went over well.
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« Reply #138 on: November 25, 2018, 06:44:09 pm »

Looks good, Lee!

I didn't do anything for Thanksgiving, as per instructions, but I will do something for Christmas.
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Tell him when l come up to him and ask to play the record, l'm gonna say: ''Voulez-vous jouer ce disque?''
'Voulez-vous, will you kiss my dick?'
Will you play my record? One-track mind!
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