Author Topic: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...  (Read 126015 times)

Offline Fran

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #100 on: January 31, 2008, 12:52:39 pm »
Re:  Margaret Pomeranz's The tragedy is that you feel that Heath wasn't at the peak of his career, he'd achieved a lot but you felt that more wonderful work was still to come.

I think she was trying to say that Heath just kept getting better and better, with each performance becoming more and more amazing.

If Heath was already at the peak of his career, then the only place to go would be down.  In her opinion, he still was moving up and even better stuff was yet to come.

It's complimentary, IMO, but it could have been worded better.

Offline ennisD

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #101 on: January 31, 2008, 07:37:51 pm »
I am sorry if this has been posted before. This is probably the most amazingly beautiful video tribute to Heath.

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UpwlBGFK10[/youtube]

I hadn't really cried and still find it hard to believe that Heath is no longer with us. This vid is the first one that actually made me cry like a baby. It is a wonderfully crafted tribute. My sincere condolences to his family and loved ones. Hugs to all of you.

Offline Meryl

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #102 on: January 31, 2008, 10:04:55 pm »
I am sorry if this has been posted before. This is probably the most amazingly beautiful video tribute to Heath.

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UpwlBGFK10[/youtube]

I hadn't really cried and still find it hard to believe that Heath is no longer with us. This vid is the first one that actually made me cry like a baby. It is a wonderfully crafted tribute. My sincere condolences to his family and loved ones. Hugs to all of you.

Ach, so sad and beautiful.  Ennisjack.com totally got it right.  Thanks for posting that, ennisD.  :'(  :'(  :'(
Ich bin ein Brokie...

Offline Aloysius J. Gleek

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #103 on: January 31, 2008, 11:13:37 pm »
Gorgeous.

After the stills (with beautiful music), at 8:29, there is video of the 421 Broome Street Memorial; I can see that the video was taken in the late afternoon on Wednesday, January 23, 2008, but no later than fairly early on Thursday, January 24--I know the individual offerings so well (The Hat, The Boot, etc.)--

If I may, I'd like to copy the video and post it again in the 421 Broome Street thread, if it hasn't been done already.

It's not just to be the completist in me, but because Kelda and her friend George have made a link from IMDb. It seems important, some how.

Thanks, ennisD. Thanks, Meryl!

xxx
John
"Tu doives entendre je t'aime."
(and you know who I am...)


Cowboy Curtis (Laurence Fishburne)
and Pee-wee in the 1990 episode
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Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #104 on: February 01, 2008, 04:46:36 am »
Could Ledger be screen legend?
By Chris Kaltenbach | Baltimore Sun Movie Critic
February 1, 2008

Hollywood legends are a funny thing. They're not always a matter of longevity; if they were, there would be no more revered figure in movie history than Lillian Gish, and how many people younger than 40 have even heard of her? They don't necessarily reflect youth snuffed out before its time; Brad Renfro's recent death, though undeniably tragic, hasn't guaranteed him a spot in the Hollywood firmament. And they don't necessarily have much to do with the quality of the work. Deborah Kerr was an extraordinarily gifted actress with a surprising range, but you don't see her image turning up on key chains and Internet tributes.

Heath Ledger had made only 13 films outside his native Australia when he died way too soon last week at age 28, and he spent fewer than eight years on the international film scene. But his death has had a profound impact on filmgoers, especially younger fans who, no doubt, saw a kindred spirit in the complex, conflicted characters he brought to the screen.



The response has been extraordinary, both for its depth and its apparent sincerity. In our media-obsessed world, the death of any celebrity strikes a resounding chord, one often out of sync with that person's fame or cultural impact. Witness the out-of-control media circus that ensued for weeks after the death of Anna Nicole Smith, a one-time Playboy model and reality-show star whose death garnered more attention than that of former President Gerald R. Ford.

Ledger's death hasn't achieved that garish level, despite the attempts of various TV celebrity magazines and entertainment show hosts to fan the flames. His fans' affections seem genuine, their respect for his work well-earned, their grief over his sad fate heartfelt.

"I tried to watch 10 Things I Hate About You, but I don't know why I just started to cry and turned it off," one visitor to imdb.com's message board wrote earlier this week. "I'm back to being distraught and crying every time I hear about Heath or watch one of his movies," said another. "I guess it's really sunk in that he's not coming back ... "

Another post, written a week after his Jan. 22 death, began with the simple word "why" repeated 18 times.

It's certainly true that Ledger had talent, and that it had barely been tapped. His performance as a jail guard unwilling to follow his father and grandfather's racist example in Monster's Ball so moved actor Daniel Day-Lewis that he had to fight back tears while recalling it during Sunday's Screen Actors Guild Awards show. Ledger's Oscar-nominated turn in Brokeback Mountain, as a cowboy in love with another man who constantly denies himself the happiness we all deserve, resonated with audiences and helped a gay love story bring in more than $83 million at U.S. box offices.

Perhaps it's too early to measure Ledger's lasting impact. It hasn't even been determined yet how he died, whether it was an accidental drug overdose or suicide, or even whether the pills found scattered on the floor around his body were the primary cause. In recent days, a video has turned up that apparently shows Ledger at a Hollywood party, talking about drug use. What effect might that video have on his legacy?

It's telling that the actors to whom Ledger is most often compared in the wake of his death, are Marlon Brando and James Dean. Brando was a true original, a determined nonconformist who brought a startlingly gritty, realistic acting style to movies that revolutionized the medium. When his onscreen character in The Wild One, a motorcyclist for whom anarchy appeared nothing short of a career choice, was asked, "What are you rebelling against," his answer was, 'Whaddya got?" A whole generation nodded in agreement.

For his part, Dean rocketed to stardom in 1955's Rebel Without a Cause, playing a chronically misunderstood, outcast teen. Two films later, Dean was dead, killed when his speeding Porsche collided with another car on a California road - just hours after a state trooper had given him a speeding ticket.

Brando and Dean spoke to members of younger generations who felt chronically out of touch with their elders, who felt disconnected from the values they espoused and the traditions they held dear. Ledger, who specialized in young characters asked to grow up too fast, uncertain of their footing and wary of those offering help, seems to have been cut from much the same cloth.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/entertainment/bal-to.kaltenbach01feb01,0,6749332.story

Offline Ellemeno

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #105 on: February 01, 2008, 07:22:49 am »
‘Juno’ Star Ellen Page Reflects On Would-Be Director Heath Ledger
7 Comments  |  Published by Larry Carroll on Thursday, January 31, 2008 at 5:46 pm.
Naturally, everyone in Hollywood these days is still shaken over last week’s tragic death of Heath Ledger. Few, however, had been in touch with the actor recently quite like “Juno” star Ellen Page, who had been in talks to star in Heath’s intended directorial debut, “The Queen’s Gambit.”

“It was talked about,” the Oscar-nominated actress said of her possibly taking the lead role in an adaptation of the novel about an orphan who becomes a chess prodigy. “But, you know,” she sighed, shaking her head, “obviously, that’s not the [most important thing right now].”

Recently, our own Josh Horowitz remembered a touching conversation he once had with the 28-year-old about their shared love of the sport of kings. In his final few years, Ledger had been making plans to slide into the director’s chair with “Gambit,” employing both his movie-making experience and his reported skills as a grandmaster-level chess player.

“It’s just extremely tragic,” Page said of her almost-director. The project has now stalled, of course, but to Page that’s barely a minuscule afterthought in this tragic tale.

“I wish his family the best, and I hope his privacy is respected,” she said. “That’s what’s getting out of control, and it’s becoming too much. Hopefully that will begin to end, that intensity.”

Would Heath have been a good director? Why or why not? Weigh in with your thoughts below.

  Comments (7)    

7 Responses to “‘Juno’ Star Ellen Page Reflects On Would-Be Director Heath Ledger”

Aussie Rob Says:
January 31st, 2008 at 7:51 pm
I think he would have been a great director weather it be while he was young or later in life. R.I.P Heath Ledger an aussie legend.

Erika Says:
January 31st, 2008 at 8:04 pm
I think Heath would’ve been a great director. Unfortunately I never saw the two music videos that he had directed, but judging by the movies he’s been in he probably knew what a great director entails. If you look at the work of Ang Lee, and the director of The Patriot and The Dark Knight (as little as we have seen), he has obviously worked with some great directors and seemed to be a jack of all trades in not just movies but in all arts. From music to painting to acting to directing, I believe he could’ve done anything. Rest in peace…

sharbari Says:
January 31st, 2008 at 9:34 pm
he could have done anything he wanted to and he would have done it with grace, compassion, intelligence and passion. His passing robs us of a truly wondrous talent.
He would have been a brilliant director because he was a brilliant actor.

Brad Says:
January 31st, 2008 at 10:03 pm
Well, I think it was James Schamus who said Heath made the decision to switch the shirts inside out at the end of Brokeback Mountain, symbolizing Ennis’ need to protect Jack like Jack had always done, him. I thought that was a really brilliant idea, and it worked really effectively in the movie. It’s things like that and his genuine interest in directing that make me think he had serious potential as a director.

Sandra Says:
January 31st, 2008 at 10:29 pm
Of course he would have been a great director-thats a given undoubtedly.
He had the privilege of having these gifts from a very young age. It takes a very special person to be able to connect with his inner talents and he recognised them from an early age which is a very big plus.

bruce Says:
January 31st, 2008 at 11:10 pm
I reflect back in my mind over the images of Heath’s work. I see the sensitivity and insight of a genius captured in minute detail in his performances. It is only a logical extension that we would have seen him as a great director. Though we will never know, can you imagine the world without Lucas or Spielberg? I think he would have been that caliber of director.
Sadly, the tremendous thoughtfulness that characterized his style seems to have overwhelmed his emotional capacity to manage it all. I am surprised how difficult it is for me to process this. Here I am a complete stranger to this man, saddened further as I consider the loss to his friends, family, and most of all the little girl who will not even be able to remember her most awesome dad.

fanshawe Says:
February 1st, 2008 at 4:18 am
If his shorts made Chris Nolan feel old, as he wrote in his tribute, he would probably have made a decent director. Too bad we’ll never know.

http://moviesblog.mtv.com/2008/01/31/juno-star-ellen-page-reflects-on-would-be-director-heath-ledger/

Offline Peachy

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #106 on: February 02, 2008, 09:56:34 am »
Re Margaret Pomeranz, I agree with Fran.  Pomeranz was a big fan of Brokeback Mountain - she thought it a beautiful film.  I think she meant Heath could go on to even greater achievements.  A quote from The West Australian:

Film critic Margaret Pomeranz has described the death as devastating.
Pomeranz said she was shocked by the news of the 28-year-old actor's death.
"I am so upset, I just can't tell you," Pomeranz told ABC radio.
"I mean he is such a talented boy and really, I think a beautiful soul.
"And I think to choose the roles he chose shows such intelligence."

:)


Offline TOoP/Bruce

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #107 on: February 04, 2008, 07:41:18 am »
http://www.smh.com.au/news/heath-ledger/courageous-explorer-of-masculinity/2008/01/24/1201157557017.html

Courageous explorer of masculinity

Reed Johnson

January 25, 2008


THIS underachieving decade has been a troubled one for the concept of masculinity.

As much as any serious actor of his generation, Heath Ledger grappled on screen with the shifting, clashing ideals of what masculinity might mean in the 21st century. He wrestled, painfully and often movingly, with trying to reconcile manhood's competing claims of duty, honour, love, sexuality, work and loyalty.

Ledger seemed to steer away from the boozy "I-love-you-man!" sentimentality that so many young male performers fall back on in order to reassure their fans that underneath whatever emotionally layered character they may be portraying, they still have that ol' swagger.

He had a basso profundo ruggedness about him, a cragginess that had begun to nip at his youthful beauty. But he was not afraid to show a deeper vulnerability, a self-doubt that apparently mirrored the actor's own soul. "I like to do something I fear," he told the Los Angeles Times in 2005. "I like to be afraid of the project … There's a huge amount of anxiety that drowns out any excitement I have toward the project."

Ledger gave vent to obsessive, over-the-top emotional states that Western popular culture, since at least the Romantic period, more commonly has assigned to women. His brave, emotionally naked performances, typically shorn of protective irony, exposed him to risks that some other stars avoid.

Even, or perhaps especially, at his most tight-lipped and stoic, as the lovesick cowboy Ennis Del Mar in Ang Lee's Brokeback Mountain, Ledger conveys the sublime inner torment that comes from willingly sacrificing everything, even your sense of self, in exchange for a few stolen moments with an object of desire.

Marlon Brando and James Dean remain the gold standard of ambivalent masculinity in postwar Hollywood. A handful of young actors will keep trying to express those ambiguities. But one wonders when another image of a male character, or two, will take hold of the imagination as firmly as the poster design for Brokeback Mountain.

The movie's representation of the ultimate American rugged individualist, in tears, gives rise to powerful, uncomfortable emotions at a time when America itself has been humbled and, in the eyes of much of the world, emasculated.

Los Angeles Times
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Offline Katie77

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #108 on: February 04, 2008, 08:21:13 am »
Wow.....what a compliment he gives to our Heath........and to the movie BBM.....

he found words to describe Heath that I've never heard before, but oh so true...oh so true.....
Being happy doesn't mean everything is perfect.

It means you've decided to see beyond the imperfection

Offline TOoP/Bruce

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Re: Heath Ledger Tributes and Obituaries...
« Reply #109 on: February 04, 2008, 02:34:42 pm »
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/arts/reellife/jan08/heathcandy.htm

Heath Ledger's real tour de force
Posted by Tim Robey on 04 Feb 2008  at 14:00

I'd been planning to rewatch Candy, Australian director Neil Armfield's harrowing 2006 drama about the relationship between a pair of heroin addicts, even before the news came through that its leading man Heath Ledger had died of a drug overdose.

In the days after his death, news story after appreciation after obituary singled out Brokeback Mountain as Ledger's crowning achievement, and nothing should be said to put a dent in that: it was not only his moment of greatest acclaim and exposure but, by any reckoning, a wonderful performance, fine-tuned and gruffly moving, in a film that had caught the popular imagination like no other in 2005.

My thoughts, though, kept returning to Candy, a neglected film outside its native Australia, and a follow-up vehicle for Ledger that had blown me away at the time of its brief UK release. If Brokeback's Ennis Del Mar was, and will always remain, Ledger's most iconic part, was it not possible that this was his real tour de force, the moment when he stretched himself most as a screen actor, dug most deeply? Feeling like a bit of a hearse-chasing opportunist, but justifying it in some way as an act of mourning, I bought the DVD to find out.

I wasn't wrong – watching this painful, personal, and oddly lyrical film is the best way I've found to work out one's feelings about the death of its star. Not only is his work as the cowardly, feckless hero Dan every bit as startling as I'd remembered, but it stands up now as the most open, revealing performance of his career, and the one which gave us the fullest sense of his capabilities.

Ennis Del Mar, quite by design, was a closed sort of performance. Closed if not closeted: Ledger is hiding himself from us, and the other characters, in the vast majority of his scenes. Until the very last moments of the film, which we spend alone with him and Jack Twist's shirt, the point is that Ledger's Ennis has spent most of Brokeback backing away from his feelings, or at least not fully owning up to them. The performance was a careful retreat into mumbling, self-imposed solitude, and a kind of emotional autism.

But when Ledger's Dan gives into the bliss of a pure heroin high in Candy, or watches and waits in the car while his girlfriend (Abbie Cornish) sells her body to buy them their next hit, or slumps whimpering in the shower while his entire frame screams at him to fuel the addiction, the mixture of emotions that plays out on his face is extraordinarily frank and complicated. Ledger's acting here is such a naked high-wire act it's almost embarrassing, which is exactly as it should be. Dan has nothing to hide except his own weakness, which he hides abysmally, and no public image to project except the one that's slightly less off his face than he typically is.

Far outclassing his perfectly adequate co-star – who, for reasons that puzzle me, won the greater share of acclaim for this – Ledger responds to every challenge of his part with conviction, sensitivity, sympathy, hilarious candour, frightening believability, and a spark that stays alight, deep down, even when the character becomes a virtual shell of himself. It's hard not to be curious about what well of personal experience he may, or must, have tapped in this performance. But it's even harder to deny, having seen it, that Ledger was an amazing actor.

Posted by Tim Robey on 04 Feb 2008 at 14:00
Former IMDb Name: True Oracle of Phoenix / TOoP (I pronounce it "too - op") / " in fire forged,  from ash reborn" / Currently: GeorgeObliqueStrokeXR40